Results tagged “mobile advertising” from IABlog

Make Mobile Work Kicks Off with "HTML5: The Mobile Opportunity"

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In case you haven’t heard - we here at the IAB’s Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence are on the charge to Make Mobile Work this year. Based on our research last year around marketer perceptions of mobile and roadblocks to broader adoption of mobile advertising we’re setting out to show brands and agencies how to overcome these issues (both real and perceived) and start engaging with audiences on all of their devices. 

Our first webinar took place last Tuesday, March 18 and was all about discovering the power of HTML5 to create superior mobile ad creative. More than 150 marketers, agency buyers and publishers joined in to hear the IAB, AOL and Google discuss the importance of mobile advertising and steps to get started using HTML5. The webinar showed the power of HTML5, increased engagement of these ads and a walk through of how one brand started down the path to adjust from a Flash-only strategy. You can view the webinar and accompanying materials here as well as explore upcoming sessions on Make Mobile Work.

To keep the conversation going, Mollie Spilman, EVP Global Sales & Operations at Millennial Media, one of the original signatories of our Open Letter to Marketers, shared the following findings:

Millennial Media HTML5 Report
Through the use of rich media, agencies and brands are creating clear, meaningful experiences for their audiences. They’re going beyond the banner to leverage unique features such as gamification, swipe galleries, voice recognition, video, and more - and seeing the benefits in spades. 

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In our latest Millennial Media S.M.A.R.T., we report on the impact rich media and video ads have on click-through rate (CTR) vs. standard banners. Automotive rich media and video ads, for example, saw an average of 3.5 times the CTR of standard banners. We’ve found that automotive advertisers often use video in their campaigns to show in-action driving, or dynamic ads that allow a consumer to swipe through different vehicle models or colors. Rich media and video ads run by education advertisers also saw 3.5 times greater CTR than standard banners. These brands incorporate animation, short quizzes, and video to get consumers thinking about their learning needs and resulting careers. Similarly, consumer goods’ rich media and video ads saw an average of 2.6 times the CTR compared to standard banner ads. Consumer goods advertisers tend to use video and interactive games to drive brand awareness.

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EY (Formerly Ernst & Young) is one company taking its brand awareness to the next level through rich media. In an effort to stay top of mind for - and appeal to - business and accounting majors interested in post-grad entry level positions, EY tapped Millennial Media and Mediahub/Mullen to craft an interactive, highly-targeted campaign. The creative teams collaborated on a strategy to take the main pillar of EY’s campaign, “Amazing from every angle,” and turn the messaging into an engaging experience that allowed mobile users to choose from a selection of origami figures and create them virtually through their smartphones’ touch screen. To ensure the creative reached the most relevant audience, Millennial Media also added deployed geo-location targeting capabilities to pinpoint, within two miles, the 57 pre-selected university campuses.
Rich media capabilities will continue to evolve as mobile devices evolve - but don’t wait! Creative teams are pushing the limits of mobile, much to the benefit and satisfaction of advertisers and consumers. 




About the Authors


sp_smith_belinda_100x134.jpgBelinda J. Smith

Belinda J. Smith is Senior Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the Interactive Advertising Bureau



Mollie Spilman_Millennial Media.jpgMollie Spilman

Mollie Spilman is EVP of Global Sales & Operations at Millennial Media



Demand for programmatic buying in mobile has skyrocketed in 2013. At the IAB, we saw this trend unfolding and launched the Mobile Programmatic Buying Working Group, led by Joe Laszlo as staff manager and Victor Milligan of Nexage as chair, to address this rapid growth and the unique aspects of mobile programmatic. As the working group’s leaders, we co-wrote this post to outline some of the key takeaways from the group’s conversations, and share our thoughts for 2014.

While there are certainly similarities between PC and mobile programmatic, the differences warrant a working group dedicated to mobile. These differences are critical design points for publishers, exchanges, buyers, agencies, and advertisers, and include:

  • Mobile’s unique and massive applications and game ecosystem
  • Mobile’s data model that is built absent a universal, persistent third-party cookie
  • Mobile’s unique targetable data including location (notably lat/long), mobile OS (iOS and Android), carrier, connection type, and device types.
  • Mobile’s form factor and the importance of creative that is optimized for smartphones and tablets

The Mobile Programmatic Buying Working Group brings together 40 individuals at a diverse array of IAB member companies with a shared interest in how programmatic is evolving in mobile and how the IAB can help members understand and fully capitalize on programmatic.

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Takeaways 

The group’s first task was to organize the broad concept called programmatic and focus on those items important—and unique—to mobile. 

Given that programmatic has come onto the digital landscape quickly and that programmatic itself describes a family of technologies, we needed to itemize and define the different programmatic markets. Aligned with the IAB Programmatic Publishers Task Force, we identified four types of marketplaces:

  • Automated Guaranteed (reserved inventory at a fixed price, just transacted via an exchange, also known as programmatic reserved or guaranteed)
  • Unreserved Fixed Rate (unreserved inventory at a fixed price, also known as preferred deals or first right of refusal)
  • Invitation-Only Auction (unreserved inventory sold at auction, but to a select number of potential bidders, commonly referred to private marketplace or exchange); and
  • Open Auction (unreserved inventory sold at auction, to any bidder, usually using real-time bidding [RTB]).

Although the world of ad exchanges (in both PC and mobile) started with a largely open auction model, other models such as various forms of invitation-only auctions like exclusive or first-look private exchanges have generated a great deal of interest from publishers and buyers alike. A recent analytics report from Nexage describes trending in programmatic and the extraordinary uptake in private exchanges, as publishers and buyers become more comfortable and adept at using private exchanges to accelerate their businesses.  

The task force then began to discuss key mobile programmatic issues that will guide our work. Examples include:

  • The data model: The lack of cookies in mobile has an impact across most elements of programmatic buying. Because third-party cookies are not typically available, mobile ad inventory relies on proprietary means of targeting, tracking, and accountability, which aren’t always articulated clearly to buyers. Nexage views exchanges in all their various manifestations as serving as a critical integration point between first-party data (e.g., from the publisher/network/inventory owner), brands’ CRM data, and third-party data. 
  • Targetable data: There are a number of data types that apply in mobile that don’t have PC analogs, including location, operating system, carrier, network connection (wifi, 3G, 4G, etc.), and even handset maker/device model.  Some of the parameters, are sometimes considered complicating aspects of mobile fragmentation, but they can be better seen as methods for better targeting in an exchange setting, providing a valuable proxy for consumer demographics (e.g., iPhone users are different from Android users).

  • Transparency: Ensuring that programmatic is not a black box but a clear box where transparency aids impression level decisioning is a priority. For example, latitude/longitude (lat/long) is a critical parameter for hyperlocal campaigns, but not all lat/long data are created equal. Some are GPS derived, but others are derived from zip code or post code, called centroid lat/long, which are far less precise. Some exchanges already have business controls to enable buyers to know which is which and target and price accordingly.

Looking Forward

Across both PC and mobile, programmatic is shifting from a disruptive force to a valuable (and necessary) solution connecting ad buyers with desired ad opportunities. As we get into 2014, we have several ambitions for our working group:

  • Analyze the issues related to mobile programmatic’s unique factors to help members best understand and capitalize on the opportunity.
  • Provide input to the IAB’s other programmatic efforts, making sure that mobile’s unique aspects are represented.
  • Continue to serve as a forum for exchanging experiences and sharing knowledge.
  • Start collecting emerging good or best practices and case studies to illuminate what is working for buyers and sellers alike. 
  • Organize an industry town hall conversation to help disseminate our learning to marketers and agencies that need it.

It’s been an exciting year for mobile programmatic buying, and next year promises to be even more so. We’re looking forward to kicking the Mobile Programmatic Working Group into high gear, addressing challenges and ensuring continued growth for everyone.

About the Authors 


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Joe Laszlo
Joe Laszlo is Senior Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB. 

Victor Milligan
Victor Milligan is the CMO of Nexage where he leads all marketing and analytic functions. Twitter: @vtmilligan.
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Mobile Discrepancies: Not as scary as you might think

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Discrepancies are one of the biggest headaches in the digital advertising ecosystem, but they are also something everyone deals with. As the industry has matured, standards have been created and adopted, vendor offerings and tracking have become more consistent, the internet has become faster and more stable and as a result the difference between two parties’ counts has decreased to an acceptable percentage (most of the time). Then, new technology is introduced that stirs the water and discrepancy percentages can become all over the place again. The mobile ecosystem has introduced an array of devices, operation systems and versions, applications and even new behaviors to the mix. Not to mention the inconsistency of a user’s connection when moving around in the physical world.  

All these new variables can be quite intimidating. How would you ever know where to start investigating a mobile discrepancy? Luckily it is not as scary as it sounds.  While it is true there are additional variables to take into consideration, the most common root causes still boil down to the same ones the industry has experienced for years with desktop campaigns: human error, when ad calls are made in the ad serving sequence, and differences in vendors reporting and targeting offerings. 

  • Human Error - The more manual steps needed to launch a campaign, the more room there is for errors to occur which may result in discrepancies. With new vendors and products plus the use of code based HTML5 creatives with many assets instead of a tidy flash file, the mobile marketplace isn’t as automated as the desktop marketplace.
  • Ad Serving Sequencing - Just like with desktop campaigns there are often multiple parties tracking a single campaign. Typically all of the ad calls don’t fire at once, even if they are all tracking the same thing.  Latency and short session time common in mobile make the difference in ad calls a more significant variable than on desktop. 
  • Reporting - Every vendor has their secret sauce to differentiate themselves in the marketplace. Sometimes it has to do with the metrics they measure or how they validate traffic. As the mobile marketplace matures reporting offerings will be become more consistent, but until then it is important to make sure you are comparing the same things across reports.  
  • Targeting - Similar to reporting targeting offerings will differ in their features and capabilities. While this is true for desktop targeting as well there is more variability in mobile such as multiple ways to identify location. 
IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence’s new document Mobile Discrepancies: Exploring common root causes gives more detailed explanations of common discrepancy causes for mobile campaigns. Providing ample time to test and QA campaigns before launch is the most important thing you can do to avoid large discrepancies. It is important to not just test that the creative works, but also confirm all parties are tracking the same thing, especially when working with new partners. If not, it doesn’t matter what device you are running the campaign on, you are comparing apples to oranges. When these differences are discovered it is important to share that knowledge and work together to solve the problem. The more discrepancies causes are understood, the more they can be avoided fostering more trust in the mobile marketplace. 

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About the Author
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Sabrina Alimi

Sabrina Alimi is the Senior Marketing Manager of the IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, where she has a focus on mobile ad operations and key mobile initiatives such as HTML best practices, mobile creative guidelines, discrepancies, and the future of the cookie. In addition, Sabrina leads the IAB’s Local Committee, exploring the opportunities that the use of location unlocks for mobile advertising. Prior to the IAB, Sabrina worked at Microsoft Advertising on the Atlas Media Console where she became a product expert providing technical support to clients and managing bug escalations. She can be reached on Twitter @SabrinaAlimi.

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Global Research: Mobile for Work and Shopping

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As both a founding supporter of the IAB Mobile Center of Excellence and a technology media company, IDG has a special interest in trying to better understand buyers and sellers.  Numerous research reports have chronicled the explosive adoption of mobile devices but for mobile advertising to accelerate, it is critical to identify buyer behaviors and, most importantly, buyer preferences. To that end, a recent IDG Global Solutions (IGS) online survey asked people in 43 countries how they use their mobile devices at work and when shopping.

The IGS survey of more than 25,000 tech professionals and tech enthusiasts provides revealing insights into the importance of mobile in the buying process, the perception of mobile advertising, and the behavioral shifts brought on by rapid adoption rates for both tablets and smartphones. The spring 2013 online research reveals that today’s mobile audience is highly engaged, always on, is increasingly receptive to mobile ads, and uses tablets and smartphones at each stage of the purchase process including buying! 

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Personal and Work Lives Converge
Much has been written about the dramatic adoption rates for connected devices and mobile becoming the preferred channel for the tech savvy. However, the mobile momentum and ever-changing interaction with technology has led to major behavioral shifts. Users have migrated from the established separation of work and play toward an “always on” mentality reflected in the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) to work trend. Today, the lines between private lives and work are being erased with 41% of smartphone users and 37% of tablet users saying that they use privately purchased smartphones and tablets as business devices. The figures rise steeply in emerging regions such as Asia Pacific and Latin America where over 60% of respondents use their own devices on their work networks. Many of the respondents are among the most tech savvy, a group that serves as an early indicator of what is to come with the general population. 

Mobile Users Are Active Shoppers
The findings show that this 24/7 audience is actively searching for and recommending products, interacting with vendors and, importantly, is open to mobile advertising: when asked which formats they are most likely to engage with the IGS survey participants cited email, coupons, and location-based advertising.

Last year’s IGS research revealed that connected devices are an integral part of working life.   This year the survey focused more on which work activities are performed regularly on mobile devices. Smartphones and tablets are crucial tools starting with information collection and ending with a purchase.
 
At the product research stage 47% of all smartphone users and 67% of tablet users collect information with their devices. It is important to highlight that 40% of all smartphone users visit tech vendor sites in this process; therefore, mobile optimization is crucial for vendors. A positive mobile experience will impact brand perception and thus the final purchase as 30% of survey respondents said that they would not make a purchase with their smartphone if a site is not mobile optimized. The next stage — price comparison and checking with peers on social networks and forums — is also a tablet and smartphone activity. But most importantly, the audience is buying with their connected devices (73% of tablet users and 56% of smartphone users make purchases on their devices ). More surprisingly, nearly a quarter of professionals and tech enthusiasts make business purchases via their smartphones, while 21% make business purchases with their tablets.

Video Consumption for Entertainment and Work
Not only have technology platforms changed, different content formats are also preferred by mobile users in comparison to the wired web. Ninety percent of all tablet users said they watch video content on their device (up from 66% in 2012) while 67% indicated that they watch videos on their small-screen smartphones. Most interesting from a marketer’s point of view is the fact that users do not just watch YouTube videos and movies but also access vendor content and reviews. One-third of all respondents watch promotional videos on their tablets and 40% view videos/webcasts related to their jobs.

The many years and predictions of “this is the year of mobile” are over. Mobile adoption rates have soared for a few years as shipments of PCs continue to decline.  Marketers and media companies must respond to their prospects and audiences as they accelerate their reliance on mobile devices for interaction, entertainment, and purchase activities. 

Note: To see more survey details and charts go to http://idgknowledgehub.com/mobileidg/idg-mobile-survey/ .

About the Author
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Christina Carstensen

Christina Carstensen has over thirteen years experience in the digital media space. For the past four years Christina has headed up IDG’s Mobile offering, developing& executing mobile led strategy and programs specifically designed to connect to an ever-growing mobile audience.
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For marketers just getting their feet wet in mobile, it can be hard to understand return on investment. At the macro level, spending on mobile advertising is booming (new research from IAB and IAB Europe pegs mobile ad revenue at $8.9 Billion USD worldwide in 2012). However, an overly narrow view risks undervaluing the benefits that mobile advertising brings. That’s why we are pleased to unveil the newest IAB Mobile Center web tool: Mobile Value.

Mobile Value enables a holistic view of the multi-channel impact of mobile advertising.  Our calculator consists of a series of simple, fill-in-the-blank web-based forms that invite marketers to input basic data from a recent (or ongoing) campaign—no names or details needed. 

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The Mobile Value tool incorporates five key mobile value-drivers:

  • Calls
  • App downloads
  • Cross device purchases
  • Mobile site visits
  • In-store sales

Of course, not all of these will apply to all campaigns or all marketers, but completing a full circuit of the tool’s components results in a calculation that demonstrates, in dollars and cents, the value a marketer derives from its mobile ad investment.

Complementing each component is a set of measurement tips to help a marketer find (or estimate) the data they need, along with case studies that drive home how each of these components contributes to the total return from mobile advertising.

We’d like to thank our friends at Google for their help creating this tool, and we hope that marketers find it a useful compass as they navigate mobile’s waters!

About the Author 

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Joe Laszlo


Joe Laszlo is Senior Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB.

A room full of top mobile thought leaders gathered at the 5th annual IAB Mobile Marketplace yesterday. The IAB Mobile Marketing of Excellence was honored to lead the full day of keynote speakers, workshops, and town hall discussions on leveraging opportunities in mobile marketing. The time to act on those opportunities is now.

Inspired by an awesome event, I put together a list of 10 tweets from the event highlighting the power of mobile. Don’t hesitate to retweet them out!

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About the Author

Anna Bager


Anna Bager

Anna Bager is Vice President and General Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB. You can tweet her @AnnaBager.

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For those who have been out of the IAB news loop, last week we held our Annual Leadership Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona.  It was an intense, jam-packed few days.  One of the highlights for me was that I got to be a “provocateur” in a Town Hall-style break out session we held on mobile monetization, called “Are Mobile Pennies Inevitable? The Challenge of Mobile Monetization.”  Under the able moderation of Chris LaSala of Google and Cary Tilds of GroupM, participants jumped in to a lively series of discussions about the challenges facing mobile advertising today, and how we—the industry and the IAB—can contribute to solving them.

We started by enumerating and prioritizing the problems:  according to a Kleiner Perkins study, mobile revenue is something like 75 cents per user as compared to $3.50 per user on desktop. 

Most of the mobile problems we came up with are familiar ones:

·        1. Lack of knowledge about how to measure

·         2. Too much complexity (HTML5 v Flash, varied screen sizes, etc)

·         3. Creatives hate it:  too small, too fragmented

·         4. Standardization is needed

·         And so on….

But the biggest problem for investors and brands in mobile is that there’s a lot of chaos to sort through.  It’s hard to figure out how to invest in mobile faster, and hard to keep on top of the landscape.

What is Mobile?

 One challenge is that we don’t even have a firm answer to “what is mobile?”  And indeed, the distinction between “mobile” and “not mobile” may be fading away.  Whether we separate out mobile, or how we divide up the world, depends on what we’re talking about. 

From a marketing strategy perspective, there’s a compelling view that “mobile” shouldn’t be separated out, we should think in terms of at home versus office, event, retail, and other places.  The tablet on the couch, the screen in the car dashboard, the smartphone in a restaurant:  it’s where you are physically that defines the opportunity, not what device you happen to have.  As the IAB says, mobile is really a behavior, not a device type.

Another participant advocated a hub-and-spoke framework, where mobile is not unique or disconnected from other media, but is the central device/medium for advertising, and other media (TV, outdoor, print, PC, etc) all are spokes that relate to the mobile hub.

Plumbing

While a marketing strategy perspective may be ready to move beyond the mobile/non-mobile dichotomy, a plumbing point of view still argues for looking at mobile as a distinct medium.  There are unique, mobile-specific problems that need to be resolved before these integrated, cross-screen marketing plans are feasible.  These relate to scale, approach, and currency, among other things.  Technical solutions like HTML 5 will help with some aspects of the plumbing problem but there’s still a lot to do to get mobile advertising flowing easily.

Standards

Another strong theme from the Town Hall was that while standards are starting to exist (thanks, IAB!), they are not there, not deep enough, or not clear enough yet.

One of our subgroups recommended, “standardize first, and innovation follows.”  Another asked if it shouldn’t be the other way around.  That comment sparked the great question: “Is there a necessary trade-off between awesomeness and standardization?”  The broader chicken-and-egg question is important, and it shapes the way the IAB approaches timing for mobile and other standards projects.  We count on members and others in the ecosystem to let us know if we’re being premature or late to the game.  And I do agree that we should strive for standards that permit, or even encourage, awesomeness.

Takeaways

One summary of the conversation held that mobile does not have a monetization problem, it has a measurement problem.  And the measurement problem can be decomposed into two parts:  a plumbing problem and a standards problem.  However, we as an industry are not 100% sure on what the solution to the plumbing problem should be, and if it should cover just mobile or extend across screens/devices.  And there’s not complete agreement that there should be standards yet.

A pithier summary of the conversation was:  “The screen size is small.  That sucks.  Get over it, and learn to build mobile creative that works.”

In my mind, both of these conclusions imply time as part of the solution.  Time is needed for brands and agencies to get their bearings where mobile is concerned, and it takes time for the media side of the industry to move from competitive land grab to cooperation.  Any standards effort requires consensus around which aspects of mobile are just table stakes (where standardization helps everyone) versus things that are true competitive differentiators.  Hopefully, via conversations like this and our ongoing standards, committee, research, and other efforts, the IAB’s Mobile Center can accelerate that process.

About the Author

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Joe Laszlo


Joe Laszlo is Senior Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB.

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