Results tagged “iab” from IABlog

For the past few years IAB has been encouraging companies to invest in their employees by encouraging them to take the Sales, Ad Ops and Data certification exams. We’ve been quite successful—over 7,000 applicants so far. But, not surprisingly, we hear objections from time to time. 

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There’s one particular pushback that makes no sense to me at all. That’s the statement that certification merely increases the risk of a certified employee looking for a better opportunity somewhere else; in other words, encouraging employees to earn a credential that demonstrates professional capability actually hurts the company.

Or, as leadership specialist Peter Baeklund puts it, when someone says: “What happens if we invest in developing our people and they leave?” the proper response is “What happens if you don’t, and they stay?”

Doesn’t it make sense that people would prefer to work for companies that invest in developing their capabilities and keeping their skill sets relevant through constant learning opportunities? Doesn’t this type of commitment to the employee foster a commitment to the company in return and contribute to a better corporate culture?

There’s no denying that retention is a major problem during the boom times in our industry, but depriving managers of learning and development opportunities isn’t the answer—and it’s definitely not going to help the company either. The only talent issue that’s greater than retention today is leadership; that is, the lack of training programs that target leaders at all levels, but particularly those in the middle.

Nearly half of all Millennials currently have some leadership responsibilities according to a Deloitte study, yet 66% of the companies Deloitte surveyed reported they have weak capabilities when to comes to providing leadership programs for that demographic.

IAB recognizes that not every company can create the type of leadership program that teaches core management skills, foundational understanding of business functions, and basic business and product strategy. And that is why we have created the IAB Digital Leadership Program. This is a new approach to helping managers not only acquire knowledge, but also the skills required to take on the roles and responsibilities that our fast-changing industry requires. This is a program that’s being developed by industry professionals and subject matter experts for industry professionals. The first semester kick off this fall in both a three-day intensive and one night a week classroom format.

I encourage you—as an individual interested in taking responsibility for your own professional growth, or as a team leader who has responsibility for the growth of others—to review the IAB Digital Leadership Program and consider making an extremely worthwhile investment in the development of your staff. If you have any questions just drop us a line at [email protected], we’ll be glad to answer them.

About the Author


 
Why did IAB prepare an In-Feed Ad Unit Deep Dive?

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While the IAB Native Advertising Playbook (12/14) did a great job at identifying the six different types of native ad formats, the IAB Native Advertising Playbook V2 working group* felt it was time to take a deeper dive into the In-Feed Ad Unit Type given the growth and evolution of this ad unit type since the Playbook was written. We wanted to help marketers and agencies understand the variety of creative options available today. Senior industry leaders in the native space were surprisingly consistent in their feedback and recommendations about what should or shouldn’t be included in the Deep Dive Document. The entire Native Advertising and Content Marketing Task Force groups, totaling over 200 companies, were invited to comment on the initial working group draft document. 
 ~ Kayla Wilson, Senior Partner Manager, Global Alliances & Programmatic at InMobi, who served as the lead of the IAB In-Feed Deep Dive Working Group

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Why focus on in-feed ads by feed type?

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We focused on exploring the most commonly used in-feed ad types found on the three dominant feed types: Content Feeds, Social Feeds, and Product Feeds. Focusing on feed types helps buyers and sellers to have a common framework to assess existing and future opportunities for current and emerging new in-feed ad types on both web and mobile based on their goals. We felt this was important so that marketers and agencies know their creative options for in-feed advertising, particularly as more in-feed ads are served programmatically.
~ Dan Greenberg, Founder and CEO of Sharethrough and co-chair of the IAB Native Advertising Task Force  




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This is about best practice guidance and principles, not about being prescriptive.

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As both feed and ad formats continue to evolve, this deep dive helps provide a framework for evaluating the in-feed ad opportunities available today. Rather than dictating the exact ad experience, this document is meant to provide example implementations and guidelines on how to remain native within the feed context, ensuring the form and function of the ad align with the feed type to provide the best possible experience. 
~ Graham Harris, Sr. Director, Advanced Creative at Yahoo, co-chair of the IAB Native Advertising Task Force





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IAB In-Feed Deep Dive Summary
The below infographic summarizes the possible combinations of the three main feed types and the four main ad types. Again, this is not meant to be prescriptive, but rather a view of potential combinations of the most common feeds and ad types used today. Additional wireframe examples are found in the Deep Dive document.
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The IAB Native Advertising Evaluation Continuum 
IAB Native Advertising Task Force members continue to recommend that marketers and agencies evaluate native advertising options, in-feed or other types, on the IAB five-point criteria as outlined in the original IAB Native Advertising Playbook and included in the Deep Dive.  

And, as always, disclosure remains of paramount importance. As outlined in the IAB Recommended Native Advertising Disclosure Principles, simply put: Regardless of context, a reasonable consumer should be able to distinguish between what is paid advertising vs. what is publisher editorial content.

Conclusion
In-feed ad unit adoption is growing across publisher sites with different ad unit types introduced and/or retired quickly.In addition, feed types are also evolving beyond the three main types (content, social and product), to mixed feed types that have variable aesthetics/content which don’t fall clearly into one bucket. But even with these changes over time, it is important that one thing remain the same and that is the need to evaluate the in-feed ads from the consumer perspective to ensure that they remain native, meaning that they are so cohesive with the page content, assimilated into the design, and consistent with the platform behavior that the viewer simply feels that they belong.

It is our hope that publishers, marketers and agencies will find this deep dive into in-feed advertising options on different types of feeds to be helpful, particularly as more in-feed ads are served programmatically.  

*IAB acknowledges the Native Advertising Playbook V2 working group members from AdsNative, Bidtellect, Bloomberg, Demand Media, Disney Interactive, Disqus, GumGum, InMobi, Meredith Digital, Mixpo, my6sense, Nativo, OneSpot, Polar, PowerLinks Media, PubMatic, Salesforce Marketing Cloud, Selectable Media, Sharethrough, The Daily News, Time Inc., TripleLift, Tumblr and Yahoo, plus the many IAB members of the Native Advertising Task Force who provided thought leadership leading to the final document.  

About the Author
 

U.S. Hispanic Millennial Moms Maximize Mobile

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In February 2015, IAB and BabyCenter published 2015 State of Modern Motherhood: Mobile and Media in the Lives of Moms, a look at U.S. millennial moms and the central role that mobile plays in the things they buy and the media they watch. We decided to dive back into the data for another look, this time specifically at Hispanic millennial moms, to compare how their use of mobile and media stacks up against the average millennial mom. Unless otherwise noted, references to “moms” throughout this post refer specifically to U.S. moms in the millennial generation, aged 18-32 years old.

The Hispanic population is one of the most important demographic groups in the United States today. Among moms this is particularly true: 23 percent of all U.S. births are to Hispanic women. So any marketer looking to reach moms needs to understand Hispanic moms, and tailor their message accordingly, or they risk missing almost one in four of their target audience.

The Digital Toolbox is Key for Hispanic Moms
The data clearly indicate just how important digital media are for Hispanic moms looking for parenting related advice or insights. Seventy-one percent of Latina millennial moms whose primary language spoken at home is Spanish (going forward, we’ll call these moms “Spanish-preferred,” and we’ll call Hispanic moms whose primary language spoken at home is English, “English-preferred”) seek expert advice on parenting websites weekly or more often, as compared to 60% of moms in that demo who prefer English, and only 49% of  moms in general. This holds true for an array of other digital media.  Among Spanish-preferred Hispanic moms, 60% turn to mom blogs, 52% turn to other parents on parenting social media, and 45% look to parenting or baby apps, all much higher than the average mom. While the digital world is important for all moms in the coveted millennial age group, it is particularly so for those who are Hispanic.

Even more than PC/laptop-based digital, mobile is the key medium for Latina moms. As the table below shows, PC ownership drops for Hispanic moms relative to moms in general, and indeed, the Spanish-preferred segment is almost equally likely to own a tablet as a laptop/PC. Moreover, 36 percent of Latina moms rely on a mobile device (smartphone or tablet) as their sole internet connection—more than 2.1 times the rate of moms overall. Clearly, even more so than for the average millennial mom, Latina moms are already leading mobile-first, and sometimes even mobile-only, lives.

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Hispanic Mom Media Time Goes Very Mobile
As a mobile-first demographic, it’s unsurprising that Hispanic moms spend even more media time on their mobiles than the average mom does. While millennial moms estimate they spend about 2.8 hours daily online via smartphone or tablet, English-preferred Latina moms in that generation spend 3.2 hours, and those who prefer Spanish spend 4 hours online that way. In fact, the latter group spends 37% of their media time with mobile.

Spanish-preferred Hispanic moms make heavy use of both TV and mobile media, reporting about 11 hours of total daily media time, as compared to 8.9 hours for moms overall.

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Of course, the only way a busy mom could possibly spend that much time with media is through significant multitasking, and Hispanic moms are true experts at that. About 53 percent of this demo always or often use their smartphones while also watching TV, comparable with moms overall. One area where Hispanic moms are distinctive is in watching online video while watching TV. While 33% of moms overall watch online video on their phones while watching TV, the number jumps to 42% with Latinas.

But Hispanic Moms Present Untapped Mobile Shopping Opportunity
While they have definitely embraced mobile media, Hispanic millennial moms do surprisingly little mobile shopping. For example, 51% of moms overall say they use their mobiles in-store to help them search for better prices, as compared to 42% of English-preferred Hispanic moms, and only 39% of those who prefer Spanish.

Similarly, although 62% of moms overall look for and download mobile coupons, only 31% of the Hispanic segment does, and while 44% of U.S. moms search for and read product reviews, and 40% of English-preferred Latina moms do so, and only 27% of those that prefer Spanish use this mobile capability.

We think this is a big untapped opportunity for marketers to influence Latina moms’ shopping habits via mobile. This adoption gap would quickly close if Hispanic millennial moms were more aware of such services and capabilities, and if they were more widely available in Spanish. Marketers should not overlook the opportunity to make this demographic more mobile-shopping savvy.

Digital Advertising is a Great Way To Attract Hispanic Moms’ Attentions
In the “2015 State of Modern Motherhood” report, IAB and BabyCenter observed that millennial moms were much more likely than Gen X moms to say they frequently notice digital and mobile ads. That’s even more true of Hispanic millennial moms. Fifty-six percent of them say they frequently notice digital (laptop/PC, smartphone, or tablet) ads, as compared to 44% of millennial moms overall. And over half (52%) of Hispanic moms frequently notice mobile ads, as compared to only 37% of all moms. That is on par with the percentage of Hispanic moms who said they notice TV ads (50%). Clearly, for marketers reaching this important segment of U.S. moms, mobile is a key media channel.

About the Authors

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 




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Julie Michaelson

Julie Michaelson, Head of Global Sales at BabyCenter.

 


 

When MRAID Met VPAID

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In May of 2014 the IAB published a position paper on the role and evolution of our major creative specifications, VPAID for video, MRAID for mobile rich media, and SafeFrame for friendly iFrames on the web. We observed that the worlds of each of these individual standards, which were created to facilitate distinct kinds of digital ads, were fast converging. As a result, technology vendors and ad designers increasingly found themselves seeking ways to combine their capabilities.
Today, IAB has solved one aspect of this industry challenge by releasing a final version 1.0 of the Video Addendum to MRAID. This new ad specification facilitates creating mobile video interstitial ads that incorporate MRAID-style rich interactivity and also benefit from VPAID’s standardized methods for counting video plays, partial and complete views, and other core metrics.

This is an important step toward helping video ads propagate throughout the mobile internet. MRAID has become a true industry standard for mobile rich media, and now we have standardized a way to run video ads in mobile interstitial rich media placements.

This project presented a number of interesting challenges, as a “container” that runs MRAID ads (that is, the software within a mobile app) plays a somewhat different role than a video player that runs digital video ads. Simply figuring out how to start playing an ad in this hybrid scenario—how the ad should signal that it needs both MRAID and VPAID support, and how the container should respond—took significant time and effort. But we’ve devised a good and practical solution, while keeping implementation as simple as possible. I don’t have space here to acknowledge the many people from rich media companies and video companies alike who tremendously helped make this specification a reality, but they have my sincere thanks for their time and expertise (and their bosses have my thanks, too).

The next step is for vendors that offer MRAID-compliant containers - the mobile rich media community - to evaluate this specification and determine whether and when to build its capabilities into the next version of their products. I expect it will take a little time for addendum-compliant containers to become widespread, but given the importance of mobile video, I’m sure that we’ll see strong adoption. I’m happy that we’ve achieved today’s milestone, and with my fellow IAB Mobile Center and Tech Lab staff, look forward to continuing to extend MRAID’s capabilities and usefulness in the always-changing mobile world.

About the Author

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 


 
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The International Breakfast Session, which was started a few years ago, has now become a key discussion during the IAB Annual Leadership Meeting. Taking place on the closing day of the conference in Phoenix, Arizona, the session gathered over 50 digital advertising leaders from 11 countries to discuss the pressing issues facing the industry and how we can work better together to advance our common interests. 

Two very lively conversations were the focus of the morning, in addition to the newly released research in partnership with BabyCenter and the IAB multinational research: The first was an open International Town Hall on mobile integration, and the second was a chat on Viewability

“Everything is mobile,” explains Guy Phillipson, CEO, IAB UK, “and we are clearly in a period of global mobile exponential growth.” Although the UK now sees mobile dominates digital time, many other countries are not far behind, from a shift in consumer behavior to one in digital ad spending. As such, it is not surprising that global media owners are considering cross screen strategies to be vital even though monetization remains a key challenge. 

The challenges publishers are faced with are not necessarily country specific. Issues such as access to subscription data, tracking consumers on mobile devices, targeting and frequency capping are real problems in many markets. Certainly, regions like Southeast Asia face additional hurdles compared to Europe as the diversity from country to country is remarkable and although mobile is at the heart of what IAB Singapore has to offer, lobbying for standards and setting policy is primordial.

It also came to light in this discussion that as IABs around the world address mobile integration, it does not always make sense to have mobile broached separately from the rest of the digital landscape. The same is true with digital video, which is becoming increasingly important, as is the need for content and advertising to be constructed in a different ways (ie shorter). It was also interesting to hear how even the definition of mobile isn’t always as clear-cut as one would expect. IAB Canada, Vice President, Operations, Julie Ford, suggested separating smartphones from everything else maybe a better approach.
 
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As Randall Rothenberg, President and CEO, IAB, points out, maybe we are seeing a return of interruptive advertising because of mobile. Where it used to be one of the worse kinds of advertising, cluttering the screen, the remarkable success of mobile is that it puts ads in the middle of the content. Native or in-stream advertising in mobile can in essence be compared to television ads or even magazine ads.  

There was a solid agreement from everyone present on the need to better understand the multi-screen evolution, what meets consumers’ needs and what works for advertisers. And clearly the need for research in terms of screen sizes and their impact as that is an important part of creating effective advertising. From IAB Canada’s html5 webinar series to the work IAB is doing this year on establishing new responsive standards, it is evident that the key is to get agencies and advertisers on board by understanding the impact of mobile advertising and not just looking at mobile from a technology standpoint.

The chat on Viewability was equally vibrant. 

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Lou Paskalis, SVP, Enterprise Media Executive, Bank of America, and Julian Zilberbrand, EVP, Activation Standards, Insights & Technology, ZenithOptimedia, were joined by Sherrill Mane, Senior Vice President, Research, Analytics, and Measurement, IAB, and actively engaged everyone in the breakfast on what planning and trading on a viewable metrics means and how we as a global industry are not ready for this yet, until the issue measurement has been tackled. 

Again, not limited to the U.S. market, there are fraudulent actors in the digital advertising ecosphere and it is completely understandabl
e that advertisers do not want to be paying to send a message out to consumers that is never seen. As Julian pointed out, that would just be a waste. What it comes down to is the opportunity to have consumers receive the message and for it to be viewed. Sherrill underlined that Viewability is important for everyone’s KPIs, and it is more than planning and buying media, it is knowing the value so that you can build models based on more than air.

From all corners of the world, there is a lot of noise out there about Viewability but until there is clarity and agreement on measurement, we are functionally in a period where the focus needs to be on tracking. Conducting business on viewable impressions does not make sense today. Most publishers don’t have systems in place to manage Viewablity and as Julian pointed out so well, this is the year they need to push technology partners for a solution. And tying in to our earlier conversation about mobile, Lou pointed out that not only does the counting process need to be addressed overall but given that mobile is at the center of what so many are doing now, mobile Viewability aught to be fast-tracked. 
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If you would like to get engaged with the IAB Global Network, be sure to save the date for the next significant event, IAB Global Summit, to be held in New York on September 30 and October 1, 2015. In the meantime, you can learn more at www.iab.net/global and browse the full IAB Global Network Facebook photo album here.


About the Author

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Alexandra Salomon

Alexandra Salomon is the Senior Director, International at the Interactive Advertising Bureau


 
A whopping 70 percent of marketers say they are planning to increase their social media advertising budget in 2015, according to the recent Salesforce 2015 State of Marketing Survey of 5,000+ global marketers. Yet, as social media platforms incorporate new paid advertising options to replace older ones, it is increasingly difficult for agencies and marketers to navigate the available ad products in the paid social media world.  


To help make sense of this rapidly evolving space, the IAB Social Media Committee worked with the top seven social media platforms to develop a “one stop shopping” guide that provides the industry with an up-to-date framework for buying advertising on Facebook, Foursquare, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Tumblr and Twitter. 
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 “In a world that moves fast, relying on resources such as the IAB Social Media Guide provides tremendous value to marketers, giving them true insight into the social media landscape. But the real value comes from marketing partners for each social platform who can us this guide as a reference to better evaluate all the amazing options at their disposal to reach the right audience, the right way, at the right time in the purchase funnel. This guide is an evolving working document, as evolving as our industry is,” said IAB Social Media Committee Co-chair Carine Roman, Head of Global Advertising Operations at LinkedIn. Readers can use the interactive guide to focus on the platforms they are most interested in. 

Fellow Co-chair Christine Cuoco, Director of Global Business Marketing at Twitter added, “Our hope is that this collaboration inspires creativity, innovation and high quality work.”

What do the social media platform contributors have to say about the guide?

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The Social Media Buyer’s Guide is a great resource that helps marketers and agencies understand how they can drive real, business results across some of the largest and most engaging publishers in the world. It’s great to see that all partners came together to create one valuable resource. For more information about advertising on Facebook and Instagram, please visit: https://www.facebook.com/business/resources and http://business.instagram.com/

 - Judy Lee, Head of Industry Marketing at Facebook


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This comprehensive guide provides a helpful top-line view of paid social media vehicles, as well as the current capabilities and ideal uses for each platform. Our belief is that as advertisers harness the intrinsic value in social and location-based platforms, the IAB Social Media Guide will prove to be a useful tool for laying groundwork for client use cases and campaign expectations.

- Swen Graham, Director, Creative and Brand Strategy at Foursquare




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This one-stop resource guide is a solid framework for getting started with marketing your brand across leading social media platforms. An amazing collaborative approach to social media creating an aggregated guide needed to up level your social marketing efforts. For more information and to get started with LinkedIn products, please visit https://business.linkedin.com/ or contact your LinkedIn Account Executive.

- Todd Graham, Campaign Manager, Ad Operations, Marketing Solutions at LinkedIn and     Scott Lowry, Manager of Ad Operations at LinkedIn




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While these platforms are often lumped together as “social” there are important distinctions that make them unique. For example, Pinterest does connect people, but at its core, it’s a visual bookmarking tool that’s most often used to help people plan their lives. This guide is a helpful reference to help you plan your approach to make the most of each platform. For more information about Pinterest Tools, please visit https://business.pinterest.com.
 
- Yolanda Lam, Agency Partnerships at Pinterest




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This collective guide is a tremendous and reliable resource for marketers looking to elevate their brand presence and captivate new audiences across the ever-evolving social landscape. For more information on getting started with Tumblr, please visit Tumblr.com/business or contact [email protected].

- Tyler Penell -  Sales Development & Strategy; Karen Shosfy- Industry Communications Manager at Tumblr





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This guide is a powerful resource for any marketer who wants to stay up to date on best practices across multiple ad platforms. Access additional resources and marketer success stories at https://biz.twitter.com/success-stories, and reach out to your account lead with any questions.

- Julie Martin- Sales Manager, Media & Entertainment and  Adam Schatz, Account Manager, Media & Entertainment at Twitter






What’s Next? 
It is intended that the Social Media Buyer’s Guide will be updated as major ad product changes are announced by any of the seven platforms, so please check back frequently to get the most up-to-date ad product information.  


About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst




 

3 Reasons Advertisers Need Advanced Television Now

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Advanced Television truly has… advanced. An estimated 75-100MM Americans watch TV content over IP across a host of devices. TV Everywhere video starts grew by over 100% last year. Addressable TV already reaches tens of millions of households across DISH, DIRECTV, Cablevision and Comcast, and soon could jump by about another 50% with the addition of multichannel video programming distributors (MVPD’s)/multi-system operators (MSOs) such as Charter, Cox, and Verizon. 

With staggering numbers like these, what we’ve been calling “Advanced TV” rightfully should be called, simply: “TV.”

The underlying technologies of Advanced TV have enabled innovation in content delivery and interaction, which has led to radical consumer behavior shifts. The way people watch TV—how, where, and on what devices—has changed. And in this shift, the IAB sees tremendous opportunity for advertisers’ strategies around media, creative, and measurement to evolve as well, generating greater value for advertisers, for publishers and distributors, and yes, for viewers.

To step back and define Advanced TV: it is the evolution of television, far beyond the linear television viewing experience and :30 commercials of the past 50 years. Non-traditional television consumption methods - such as time-shifting on DVRs, VOD and interactive television (iTV) — and enhanced cross-device viewing experiences — such as TV everywhere and Over-the-Top (OTT) viewing — have enabled unprecedented consumer control and choice. New content delivery platforms and functionality enable marketing nirvana: better targeting and addressability, more efficient and automated buying and selling methodologies, more holistic measurement and robust insights, and all of this enabling more impactful and influential campaigns. Advanced TV brings the best capabilities of digital advertising to TV advertising. 

To help accelerate innovation and adoption in this space, the Advanced TV Advisory Board of the IAB has begun work on an industry primer, to be published in Q2 2015. The primer will serve as a resource and buyers’ guide, pointing the way to help brands and agencies access the 3 core advantages of Advanced TV advertising:

First, the highly effective targeting technologies available through Advanced TV platforms help advertisers find their audiences — and re-aggregate them at scale — cross-device and at any time and place. And the addressable technology of Advanced TV makes that reach and scale more relevant to that audience when and where they are found.

Second, the richly interactive technology of Advanced TV enables greater engagement. Audience choice — viewers choosing their content and influencing or potentially even choosing which ads they see — ensures deeper engagement with that content and the advertising that goes with it. Richer data return on what audiences are choosing helps further refine the addressability of the platform, since based on the viewers’ choices of both content and advertising, the ads being served can be optimized.

And third, that same data return offers advertisers more effective and meaningful measurement of campaigns. Brands can be more certain that they actually reached their audience effectively, and gain insight into viewers’ usage and engagement. These insights feed back into the top of the cycle, helping advertisers target, reach, and engage their audience more and more effectively.

In short, with Advanced TV, advertisers have the opportunity to deliver more targeted messages and interactive content, with accountability far beyond simple media exposure. Stay tuned (so to speak) for the publication of this industry resource to help smart advertisers achieve exactly that. Until then, here are two more ways to derive more value from this space:
If you are an advertiser interested in exploring Advanced TV advertising, be sure to bring it up with your agency and ask for recommendations. 




About the Authors

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Elaine Boxer

Elaine Boxer is the Director of Industry Initiatives at IAB.



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Chris Falkner

Chris Falkner is the Senior Vice President of Advanced TV, NBC Broadcasting at NBCUniversal.



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Adam Lowy

Adam Lowy is the General Manager of Interactive & Advanced TV at DISH



 

Top 5 Trends in Digital Out of Home

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We tend to spend a lot of time outside and on-the-go, getting from one place to the next. It’s no surprise, then, that the average global consumer is exposed to various Digital Out of Home Media for 14 minutes per week, and investments in the space are expected to grow 14.2% year-over-year between 2011 - 2017. New York City’s Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan has recently reopened, accommodating up to 300,000 daily riders and boasting more than 50 digital screens available for marketers. The largest and most expensive digital billboard debuted in Times Square this past November, with just as many pedestrians expected to pass through the area daily. The overlapping powers of digital, mobile, outdoor, and Out of Home content seem to be stepping up.

Digital Out of Home (or “DOOH” as the channel is commonly referred) encompasses a variety of screen shapes, sizes, and levels of interactivity. From digital billboards and signs on taxis, to digital signage at airport gates and gyms and waiting rooms, these varieties underline a necessary bridge between context and location in relevance and favorable recall - vital components of any media campaign. The IAB sees norms and expectations from the online advertising world informing and expediting the growth of DOOH, and the IAB’s Digital Out of Home Taskforce launched this past fall with aims to define the DOOH channel while positioning its place within the larger interactive advertising industry.

As we collectively say “hello” to 2015, the Taskforce shares its thoughts on the Top 5 Trends in DOOH.
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photo courtesy of Luke Luckett, IAB Consultant

“Top 5 Trends in Digital Out of Home”

1. Cross-platform targeting opportunities are on the rise. As mobile devices become more advanced and ubiquitous, the proliferation of captive digital screens in home and out of home has been growing. Interactions with consumers have become more prominent via new mobile technologies like NFC, beacons and more accurate geofencing capabilities. Such technologies may allow a marketer to personalize the consumer’s experience and even allow for immediate interaction.

2. DOOH will provide increasingly relevant messages in locations that matter. The amount of time spent outside and in transit is increasing in many regions.  New forms of targeting and subsets have made the art of reaching specific audience segments in ideal locations easier - and in our highly distracted modern experience, a consumer’s receptivity to new concepts outside the home can be highly impactful. In fact, a recent study by YuMe and IPG Media Lab found that consumers are 41% more receptive to advertising in public places than at home, and 16% more receptive at school/work than at home. As a consumer, the device you carry with you creates a natural tie-in to your visual experience outdoors, and relevant DOOH messages enhance the value via existing screens throughout popular locations.

3. Data is (literally) where it’s at, locally and programmatically. According to BIA/Kelsey, marketers spent $1.4 billion on location-targeted mobile campaigns in 2012. By 2017, spending on location-targeted mobile advertising will reach $10.8 billion, representing a 52% share of all mobile ad dollars. (In fact, next month the IAB’s Location Data Working Group will release a primer on using location data for attribution and ad effectiveness.) DOOH is benefiting from this rapidly growing segment, using big data to reach the same mobile consumer on larger, higher impact screens and enabling marketers to craft cross-screen, location-based strategies to maximize the impact of advertising to consumers outside the home.       

At the same time, finding scale and ease of buying in DOOH is being made easier through programmatic conversations and data-driven media buying. Programmatic solutions are developing in DOOH, and are leading to a deeper connection with the mobile and interactive marketplaces. Programmatic DOOH has the potential to drive standardization and reduce overall fragmentation in the marketplace. The 1st and 3rd party data sets that allow buyers and sellers to better define audiences exposed to DOOH media is also rapidly evolving. Programmatic bidding enables buyers to more accurately target the most appropriate audience, while sellers benefit from yield optimization of their media assets.

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photo courtesy of Outfront Media

4. Out of Home creates a unique canvas for top-notch creativity. From street furniture and cinema ads to augmented reality and live experiences on outdoor screens and vehicles - the ability to build awareness and drive impressive results is getting easier in DOOH. Whether it’s part of a larger cross-media effort or a locally focused campaign, DOOH offers opportunities to reach a unique audience, creating unexpected parallels between location (as content and backdrop) and messaging. DOOH has huge potential to drive immediate impact and scale close to point of purchase; it also can garner award-winning praise and even the Direct Grand Prix at Cannes

5. There is a rise of new measurement and addressability opportunities in DOOH. New location and mobile data sets are leading to new ways of measuring attribution in experiential and out of home media. Location, as an audience definer, is just as important to DOOH as it is to mobile advertisers. Retargeting in the real world is more than just copying the online model; the best context is location - where we are and who we are. It is about delivering real-world context and campaign messages that are close to point of purchase. A consumer’s exposure to these mediums can now be verified beyond the self-reported opportunity to see, improving marketers’ confidence in their ability to isolate the impact of DOOH from other mediums in the cross-channel mix

Looking forward, the space is heating up. The number of digitally connected screens is growing, and all signals indicate that inventory and creative options in digital out of home media will continue to grow. Watch this space as the IAB and its DOOH Taskforce combine the talents of key players with out-of-home, mobile, local, and video expertise to build and expand upon this growth.
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photo courtesy of Titan
 
We start the New Year by addressing a question that’s on many people’s minds in the digital industry… 

Will the FTC provide guidance on native advertising in 2015
and, if so, what might we expect?

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At December’s IAB Native Advertising Disclosure Workshop, which was attended by Laura Sullivan, Senior Staff Attorney, Division of Advertising Practices at the Federal Trade Commission, along with nearly 200 IAB event registrants, there was some speculation that the FTC had plans to provide guidance for native advertising. 

I sat down with Mike Zaneis, Executive Vice President, Public Policy & General Counsel from the IAB’s Washington, DC, office to get some perspective on what FTC guidance for native advertising might entail. 




When the FTC provides “guidance” on a specific advertising topic, what does that mean? Why do they do this?
Companies may be familiar with legal regulations that have been promulgated by the FTC, such as those issued last year under the COPPA statute. These regulations have the force of law and must be followed by companies. The FTC also brings enforcement cases against “unfair or deceptive” business practices.  Because this authority is extremely broad, the FTC sometimes helps companies understand what may be expected of them by issuing formal guidance. These documents provide examples of good or bad business practices and may provide direction in new or emerging marketplaces. 

Although it is speculative at this point in time, what might we expect from guidance on native advertising disclosure?
In the past, the FTC has issued broad-based guidance as well as guidance for specific business models. In the native advertising space they have only delved into the search advertising space, issuing guidance in 2002 and then providing an update in June of 2014. It is hard to predict what type of guidance they may issue in the future, but the focus on multiple business models during their 2013 native advertising townhall is a clear indication of the scope of their interest.  

The IAB, via its Native Advertising Task Force, issued the Recommended Native Advertising Disclosure Principles below as part of its Native Advertising Playbook (published 12/13). How similar or different might the FTC’s guidance look?

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The IAB disclosure principles are a good example of the broad-based guidance that I described above. At their core they simply attempt to apply the existing law around advertising disclosures to the emerging field of native advertising.  In this case we might expect similarly broad language from the FTC, accompanied by specific examples in several native advertising categories such as In-Feed and Recommendation Widgets as outlined in the IAB Native Advertising Playbook. This was how they developed their “.com Disclosures” guidelines in the past.

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FTC.com Disclosure document. Source: FTC

Do you have any suggestions on what, if anything, publishers/marketers/agencies could or should do in anticipation of potential guidance being issued for native advertising?
As an industry we should strive to be proactive versus reactive in this area. At the IAB’s recent native advertising townhall event we heard from more than a dozen companies about how they are evolving their disclosure practices. These developments ensure that consumers understand where the content on the page ends and the advertisement begins. Many of us long assumed that disclosure and consumer engagement were countervailing forces, but we are discovering that, to the contrary, an informed consumer is a happy, engaged consumer.

How does the FTC announce that they are providing formal guidance?
There is no set process for issuing guides. In the ideal scenario they will publish a draft and solicit public comment before finalizing the document. However, they have sometimes simply issued new guides without a comment period or, in the case of search advertising, just sent letters to a number of companies to provide details on the updated guide.

If guidance is issued, how should publishers/marketers/agencies respond?
While they do not carry the same legal weight as a regulation, guides provide insight into the types of areas where the FTC may bring future enforcement actions. Therefore, companies should pay close attention to the “advice” provided in these documents and double check their current business practices against them. Guidelines are usually just that, guidelines, and they should provide room for variation, responsible experimentation, and future innovation.
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For those who had questions about potential FTC Native Advertising Disclosure Guidance, we hope these answers were helpful. The IAB will continue to advocate that disclosure is of paramount importance for this growing source of digital advertising revenue. We will continue to provide updates on potential FTC guidance as/if available.

About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives and IAB liaison for the Content Marketing and Native Advertising Task Force groups, along with the Social Media, B2B and Game Advertising Committees at the IAB. She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst 


 

About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst

- See more at: http://www.iab.net/iablog/2014/04/GIF.html#sthash.jts7rfyl.dpuf
Tsusanblogpic.jpghe year 2014 marked an important turning point for game advertising … for all the right reasons. Driven by new technology and social and mobile adoption, the gamer landscape has rapidly evolved. The evidence is clear that the demographics for games are more inclusive than ever with time spent playing growing at an unprecedented rate. And now more than ever, savvy marketers are viewing games as valuable and highly engaging content that fits in both content marketing and paid advertising strategies. 

The IAB’s new “Games Advertising Ecosystem Guide” was developed to help marketers and agencies understand today’s game play, the core game types and advertising categories to reach consumers. The guide provides an overview of today’s game play and a summary of the game advertising system outlining:

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  • The evolving and dynamic gamer landscape and trends 
  • The two main categories of games that can be played across multiple devices
  • The three main types of advertising formats available to marketers and agencies with examples
  • The most common performance models
  • The most common revenue models
  • The future evolution of game advertising

On the importance of this guide, Sandro Camarao of MediaBrix, who led the Game Advertising Ecosystem Guide working group said: It is important for buyers to understand how to leverage gaming content for maximum brand impact. Gaming has grown exponentially, and with its growth, new opportunities for brands to forge emotional connections with key audiences. The IAB Games Ecosystem Guide comes at a critical time for buyers who are determining how best to integrate gaming into their media plan.  

IAB Game Committee co-chairs added:
quotesnew.PNGIn looking forward to 2015, the IAB Games Committee will take deeper dives into each of the three main types of advertising formats to provide more guidance for marketers and agencies who seek to deploy game advertising in their content marketing strategy and media mix.

On a related note:  Be sure to check out the IAB’s recent (11/14) research study “Mobile Gamers:  Who They Are, How They Shop, and How to Reach Them.” This report examines the behaviors and economic outlook of mobile phone owners who use their smartphone for all of its functions as compared to the general US Adult 18 and over population.

About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst

- See more at: http://www.iab.net/iablog/2014/04/GIF.html#sthash.jts7rfyl.dpuf

About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst

- See more at: http://www.iab.net/iablog/2014/04/GIF.html#sthash.jts7rfyl.dpuf
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About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst

- See more at: http://www.iab.net/iablog/2014/04/GIF.html#sthash.jts7rfyl.dpuf

About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst

- See more at: http://www.iab.net/iablog/2014/04/GIF.html#sthash.jts7rfyl.dpuf




 
The IAB is only as strong as its members. 

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Each month IAB selects a member company who has demonstrated both exceptional leader and learner roles due to their elevated participation in IAB activities. Member participation in our initiatives not only empowers committees & councils to create industry-wide accepted specifications, guidelines and best practices, but also gives member companies and individuals the opportunity to have their voice heard and receive visibility for their efforts. 

This month we spoke with BrightRoll, who has taken advantage of Town Hall speaking opportunities, Webinar attendance, 3MS Educational Forums, Quality Assurance Guideline Training, IAB.networking events, and much more.


What does your company do, and specifically how does it serve the digital ecosystem?
BrightRoll builds software that automates digital video advertising globally. The company enables advertisers, publishers and technology partners to grow their business through the industry’s leading programmatic video advertising platform. 

Brands, agencies, agency trading desks, demand side platforms and ad networks use our technology to reach precise audiences at scale, reduce waste, improve performance and simplify the complexity of video advertising across screens. 

On the publisher side of the business, BrightRoll enables more than 21,000 websites, mobile websites and apps to maximize their yield and efficiency, provide control over pricing and the advertisers appearing on their sites, and simplify the process to enable the delivery of advanced video advertising formats across multiple screens.

In addition, BrightRoll partners with a consortium of technology and data companies to bring advanced capabilities to the video ad ecosystem to help marketers improve the efficacy of their programmatic video advertising campaigns.

What initiatives is BrightRoll looking forward to working with the IAB and its member companies on; and how do you motivate your colleagues to get involved?
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Tim Avila, SVP of Marketing Operations, BrightRoll
BrightRoll is an active supporter of all IAB initiatives focused on establishing guidelines, standards and best practices for digital video advertising. We look forward to continuing leadership efforts around industry wide initiatives to combat ad fraud, including the IAB Trustworthy Digital Supply Chain and IAB Quality Assurance Guidelines. BrightRoll also looks forward to actively participating in multiple working groups including the research council and the digital video, 3MS and programmatic working groups.

The value the IAB brings, not only to our business and clients, but to the industry as a whole, is evident to employees across our organization. A number of BrightRoll colleagues are active participants in IAB efforts and have either contributed thought leadership at events or joined committees and councils to support important industry initiatives. We encourage our colleagues to attend IAB events and have hosted IAB leaders at BrightRoll events to promote the progress being made by the organization and its members. We value the various opportunities the IAB offers for our employees to become involved and we encourage other industry professionals to join us in moving the industry forward.

How have you leveraged a leadership role at IAB over the past year and what was your take-away from the experience?
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Sable Mi, Senior Director, Research Strategic Planning, BrightRoll
I have been a member of the IAB for nearly four years and it has continuously proven to be a rewarding experience. Being a digital research strategist, I am always looking for better ways to measure and prove ad effectiveness across media. Working closely with IAB provides me with the opportunity to collaborate with industry leaders and continuously improve the efficacy of digital advertising.
My most recent leadership role with the IAB was at the Cross-Screen Video Town Hall where I presented ‘TV & Mobile: The Complete Picture,’ which tells a compelling story of how TV and mobile video together improves reach and cost efficiency. In addition to the town hall presentation, I have been actively involved with the IAB Research Council and its Advisory Board, Emerging Innovation task force as well as Data, Mobile Video and the Ad Effectiveness working groups; all of them are playing crucial roles in moving the industry forward. 

There is never a dull moment in this rapidly evolving industry and I value the opportunity to be a part of the initiatives that are contributing to the growth of the industry. This progress wouldn’t be possible without the dedication of the IAB and its members who have collectively provided thought leadership and guidance in standardized measurement, data and inventory quality, cross-platform ad effectiveness, and more. It is incredibly valuable for leaders from across the digital ecosystem to come together to share their expertise in an actionable way and I am honored to be a part of it. 

How did you participate as a learner at IAB over the past year and what was your take-away from the experience?
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David Liu, Business Development Manager, BrightRoll
Being a member of the IAB has been an incredibly valuable experience and I appreciate the expert learning opportunities that it provides. I began my career as an Ad Operations Manager at BrightRoll and was excited to join IAB Ad Ops Council to learn the more about the operational efficiencies within interactive advertising. Even as I’ve transitioned into my new role as a Business Development Manager at BrightRoll, I continue to find that the IAB’s diverse services are immensely valuable. 

Most recently, I attended the IAB Internet Advertising Revenue Report Webinar to monitor the latest spending trends in digital advertising and to get a better sense of where the video is headed. It’s our goal to integrate leading companies into our BrightRoll Partner Program and this report serves as a valuable data point in identifying the right partners. Additionally, the business development team at BrightRoll both appreciates and leverages the advertising standards set forth by the IAB. Regardless of whether it has to do with viewability or VPAID, the IAB standards provide an indispensable baseline for our partner integration conversations.



About the Author

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Nicole Horsford

Nicole Horsford is the Member Services Director at IAB.


 

IAB and the Future of the Cookie: Evolving to meet Market Realities

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A few years ago, the demise of the cookie was the chief worry on everyone’s mind. Marketers, agencies and publishers all struggled to imagine a future where they were able to continue delivering the seamless, connected experiences (that consumers have come to expect) in a world where the core technology supporting these strategies (the cookie) no longer existed. 

In 2012 the IAB formed the Future of the Cookie Working Group to address these issues - adding to them, the context of consumer privacy, publisher control, and other principles. 

In the “Privacy and Tracking in a Post-Cookie World” whitepaper, the group established five technology classes that described existing and emerging state management technologies, and evaluated their impact on consumers, publishers, and other industry participants. Thanks in part to the important work of this group, industry adoption and comfort with a variety of state management technologies, including the cookie, has become the norm.  

As we look ahead to 2015 and the current discussion and needs of the market, two main streams of work remain. In response to this and our members’ needs, the IAB is sun setting the Future of the Cookie Working Group to tackle these two streams of work more efficiently:  

1.  Data

Now that buyers and sellers have become more familiar with cookie-replacement technologies, and many are choosing to create their own proprietary solutions, a larger business and process discussion about audience engagement and the usage of audience data has emerged. Where the need was previously to understand the available technology choices, now many in the market are focused on gaining clarity around the new techniques, and best practices, for use and control of audience data in this developing cross-platform landscape. Including, but not limited to, the use of audience identifiers - the IAB’s Data Council will be home to continued discussions and guidance for how we can all be good data stewards. This will undoubtedly include timely issues such as data quality, protection, control and using data to inform an overall digital strategy. 

2.  Technology

Understanding the available technology has been a core effort of the Future of the Cookie working group.  With the IAB Tech Lab, we have a natural forum for continued evaluation of state management technologies, and the opportunity to bring together technical experts to develop resources and guidance for implementation.  

The IAB Tech Lab spearheads the development of technical specifications, creates and maintains a code library to assist in rapid, cost-effective implementation of IAB specifications and guidelines, and establishes a test platform for companies to evaluate the compatibility of their technology solutions with IAB protocols.   

As we move forward, these two groups will address the breadth of technologies that are available for understanding audience behavior and continue to provide guidance and leadership in those realms. So with that, we would like to extend a sincere and hearty “THANK YOU” to the more than 200 individuals, companies, members and non-members who contributed to the Future of the Cookie initiative. Also worth some praise are our stellar initial cast of co-chairs who truly contributed blood, sweat, and more acronyms than we can mention here:

  • Jordan Mitchell, VP Product, Rubicon
  • Amy Kuznicki, Associate Director, Verizon
  • Susan Pierce, Engineering Manager, Google
  • Matt Tengler, SVP Product, Millennial Media
  • Phillip Smolin, SVP Market Solutions, TURN

About the Authors

Anna Bager


Anna Bager

Anna Bager is Senior Vice President and General Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB. You can tweet her @AnnaBager.


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Scott Cunningham

Scott Cunningham is Vice President of Technology and Ad Operations at the Interactive Advertising Bureau






 

Forging the path to Data Demystification

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Data had a landmark year in 2014. This year we saw everyone get interested in data. Brands, agencies, publishers, automakers, consumers, legislators and even the Supreme Court was fixated on issues surrounding digital data. Most of these issues centered on the data captured, stored and shared by our mobile phones. 

As the device that goes everywhere with us throughout the day, the industry is now just starting to realize the immense data opportunities created by Mobile. On the revenue side, Mobile continued its unhindered ascension to digital dominance. The IAB half-year ad revenue numbers showed Mobile revenues increased 71% in 1H14 capturing 24% of total internet revenues or a total of $2.8B in ad spend.  

With this continued monumental shift to Mobile comes an ever-growing list of terms, acronyms and the confusion that accompanies any nascent industry. We at the IAB are no strangers to helping supply the tools to enable nascent markets to grow. Our Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence was started four years ago with the sole purpose of growing Mobile budgets and today we have taken another leap towards facilitating that goal. 

I’m excited to announce the release of the IAB’s Mobile Data Primer - a companion document to our updated Data Primer released in 2013. This Mobile Data Primer marks an important step in helping us coalesce, as an industry, around the data opportunities, classifications and use cases available in the Mobile Advertising Market. It also provides important Mobile data best practices and an updated code of conduct. 

Beyond providing clarity and transparency, our aim is for this primer to be used as a foundation that will enable deeper conversations around the Mobile data opportunity in the coming year. Now that we have a common knowledge base, we can explore more sophisticated use cases and can leverage Mobile data as part of an overall marketing automation strategy to inform better messaging and creative, and foster deeper consumer relationships. 

I would like to thank the IAB’s Data Council for their continued work to help truly demystify data for the digital industry, and also for their leadership in the creation of this primer. We are excited to continue these conversations as data maintains center stage in the coming years. 


About the Author

headshot.jpgBelinda J. Smith

Belinda J. Smith is Senior Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the Interactive Advertising Bureau



 

Who are Mobile Gamers and Why Do They Matter?

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Mobile Gaming apps are the most popularly used mobile app type, according to the recently released IAB study “Mobile Gamers: Who They Are, How They Shop, and How to Reach Them” which is based on an IAB analysis of Prosper Insights data and represents the self-reported media behaviors of about 15,000 US adults 18 and older (A18+). Not only is Mobile Gaming the number one app type, but Mobile Gamers represent a substantial 37% of the US adult population. 
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Who are Mobile Gamers and why should marketers and digital publishers care? Mobile gamers are likely to be women (56% vs. 51%A18+), professionals (35% vs. 28%), higher earners ($68k vs. $62k) and purchase influencers (40% vs. 32%). They earn more, they spend more and they’re more likely than the general population to be planning both major and minor purchases. A full 16% are planning to buy an auto (vs. 12% A18+). Female mobile gamers are more likely to be planning a vacation (25% vs. 18%A18+) while male mobile gamers are more likely to be shopping for a new mobile device (17% vs. 10% A18+). This is a desirable audience.

But perhaps most important to digital publishers, Mobile Gamers are heavy mobile media users who can also be reached on digital media via their mobile devices. While male Mobile Gamers tend to be heavy gamers (74% play videogames during the week), female Mobile Gamers’ video gaming habits are more reflective of the general population (49% game during the week vs. 44% of A18+). Female Mobile Gamers are casual gamers and they spend their time online, taking in all forms of media on their computers and smartphones.

As heavy digital and mobile users, Mobile Gamers’ purchases are much more influenced by various forms of digital and mobile media than the general adult population, providing ample opportunities to reach them using these ad formats. Not only is this desirable audience more likely to watch online video (73% vs. 56% A18+) and mobile video (65% vs 41%A18+) but they’re also more likely to watch the video ads (62% vs 34%A18+) and even say that their Electronics (18% vs. 13%A18+) and Clothing (12% vs. 8%A18+) purchases are influenced by mobile video.  

Being digitally savvy and mobile focused, 94% of Mobile Gamers regularly research products online (vs. 89% A18+) and on their mobile devices before buying. Interestingly, the products they’re most likely to research (Electronics and Clothing) are also the ones that digital advertising is most likely to persuade them in, presenting an ideal environment to serve such ads. Internet ads and Email ads have more influence on them than Cable TV and nearly as much influence as Broadcast TV. One in three Mobile Gamers say their Electronics purchases are influenced by Internet Ads (vs. 24% A18+) or Email Ads (vs. 25% A18+). Female Mobile Gamers are heavier Social Media users and 23% admit that their clothing purchases are influenced by Social Media (vs. 13% A18+). Thus, ads served to them while researching products, whether online or in the store on their phones, will likely be rewarded.  

Mobile Gamers are more likely to own a smartphone (52%) than a desktop computer (45%) and they regularly showroom. They’re also much more likely than the general US adult population to make purchases using their mobile devices. While Mobile Gamers ‘showroom’ regularly, consisting mostly of reading product reviews and price checking, they most often end up buying the product in person at the store or at a competitor’s store. Interestingly, Mobile Gamers are more likely to both check email on their smartphones (90% vs 62%A18+) and to be influenced by email ads, providing another opportunity to reach them in store. Since they’re reachable on the go via mobile while in the stores, targeted ads, offers or email coupons during their shopping experience would likely sway their purchases. After they’ve left the store, many Mobile Gamers will buy the product online, offering a second chance for advertisers to reach them through digital media.

In summary, Mobile Gamers are a desirable audience that is planning to spend and they shop armed with a smartphone. As heavy mobile users, they are reachable online and are always connected. Their overall media consumption profile implies that a sequenced media mix to these Mobile Gamers could be effective. An ad on a mobile video game, followed by a targeted ad online while they’re researching the product, then followed up with an email offer or targeted in-store offer (for those who are reached by beacons) to catch them while they’re showrooming could win Mobile Gamers’ dollars. Digital and mobile ads are likely to influence Mobile Gamers’ purchases so intercepting their online activities with ads and offers is likely to pay off. A savvy marketing mix that makes good use of the variety of digital formats and mobile technologies could transform Angry Birds into Happy Marketers and Words With Friends to Advertisers With ROI.


About the Author

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Kristina Sruoginis

Kristina Sruoginis is the Research Director at IAB.


 
On October 23rd, thinkLA and IAB were thrilled to host a Programmatic Summit in Los Angeles, in association with eMarketer. Our first ever collaboration focused on the rising tide of programmatic within digital media. Over 500 brand marketers, media buyers, online publishers, ad networks, ad exchanges, and other solution providers came together to discuss and debate the next evolution of programmatic. 
 
Here are the top 10 takeaways from the event about programmatic:
  1. Programmatic is more than RTB. There is a lot of confusion over the term programmatic, which many people mistakenly believe is only real-time bidding (RTB) or used only for remnant inventory. Ultimately programmatic is the process of buying and selling media in an automated fashion. This includes four main types of transactions - open auctions, invitation-only/private auctions, unreserved fixed rate/preferred deals, and automated guaranteed/programmatic guaranteed deals. Every time someone says the word “programmatic” make sure you ask what exactly they mean. Watch this Digital Simplified video that explains how one part of programmatic, RTB, works step by step.
  2. Lots of challenges still exist to enable programmatic to work. Concerns that were addressed throughout the event included transparency, fraud, and trust; limited understanding and knowledge; confusion over terminology; moving from direct response to branding dollars, moving from mostly standard banners to native, video, rising stars, and audio ad formats; internal organizational challenges for brands and publishers; and delivering different creative through programmatic.
  3. Programmatic is big and getting bigger. The programmatic market (including auction, and direct deals) is expected to top $10B in 2014 and grow to $20B by 2016. For now, RTB remains the dominant part of programmatic spending (92% in 2014), but is expected to fall to under 60% of total programmatic spend by 2016 as programmatic direct increases. Within RTB, open auctions account for 88% of total RTB spend, though this is changing with private marketplaces growing significantly faster. While display is still dominant for now, mobile and video programmatic are growing fast.
  4. Fraud and trust are big issues, but are being tackled by the industry. Bots and fraud have become a big issue mainly due to the large sums of money involved. The IAB and the industry are building a trust stack to tackle fraud, malware, piracy, and transparency and include these in a joint cross-industry accountability program) building on the existing Quality Assurance Guidelines. Advertisers and buyers should make sure they know their supply sources, choose their vendors carefully, and always remember “If it’s too good to be true, it probably is!” Publishers need to ensure they are coordinating between sales, marketing, operations, and analytics to identify any strange traffic patterns and remember if they are doing audience extension they need to apply the same controls as buyers should.
  5. Publishers can hit a home run with programmatic video. The concern that programmatic has been perceived as a “race to the bottom” for rates and yield has not been the case in video due to restricted supply. Publishers can use programmatic to fund the creation of quality video content particularly by helping to monetize traffic spikes. Ultimately efficiency doesn’t have to mean lower CPMs; it can also mean more effective engagement.  
  6. Measurement matters even more in a programmatic world. Brand marketers are looking for transparency, inventory quality, and technology simplicity. Buyers should ensure they are reaching the right audience, use a consistent, comparable metric to plan, buy, and sell audiences, use brand data to ensure advertising resonates, and ultimately ensure that the campaign drives the desired action.
  7. Attribution is essential to effective programmatic spend. Last touch attribution is outdated and is like giving all the credit in a relay race to the last runner. Attribution models should incorporate the “first site visit” separating the funnel into prospecting and retargeting, and set the right incentives to each part.
  8. Brands in automotive are leveraging programmatic. Leading brands are looking beyond the simple retargeting of ads and embracing programmatic across the consumer path to purchase from unaware to loyal purchasers. The agency automation “stack” includes four layers - unified data platform, open access to media inventory, single metrics regime, and dynamic ad creation/production/serving platform. Brands are finally learning from programmatic media to employ new tactics in automated creative—not creating by machines, but optimizing ad variables based on real-time, impression level data.
  9. Publishers need to re-org to capture the value of programmatic. Publishers are adopting programmatic as a core part of their monetization strategy. However, this can pose internal challenges. The top five ways to build a successful programmatic publisher organization were the following: align incentives and compensation; educate direct sellers and have them attend Programmatic 101 training; programmatic team to focus on supporting direct sales (agencies) and covering programmatic buying entities (DSPs, trading desks, retargeters); establish a programmatic rate card; and have internal and external quarterly budget reviews.
  10. Creativity and programmatic are not enemies. Every ad should be dynamic and leverage the same audience signals used in programmatic media buying to make the creative relevant. This can be done by infusing first or third-party data on demographics, location, and previous website behavior to alter the headline call to action, image, or assets of the ad unit to ensure the message resonates with the user. Doing this can double yield on interaction rates and increase engagement by 50%. 


 

Historic Transatlantic Partnership for the Digital Ad Industry

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Today IAB US and IAB Europe join together to publish recommendations for promoting global trade and innovation as our respective governments negotiate a vital trade program. Titled “Modernizing Safe Harbor to Ensure Continued Growth in the Digital Economy”, we provide the industry’s first consensus policy position on data governance issues, and hope they can serve as guidance for ongoing negotiations between the US and Europe on the revision of the Safe Harbor framework.

The US and EU are among the world’s most vibrant digital advertising marketplaces, together representing $92 billion in annual revenue, or nearly 70% of the global industry, and maintaining equally significant market share in emerging categories such as mobile advertising.

The Safe Harbor framework has greatly contributed to the success of this marketplace by providing more than 4,000 businesses, including many IAB member companies, a means to transfer data across the Atlantic in a streamlined and cost-effective manner that ensures consumer protection.

As negotiators in the US and EU undertake the critically important task of reviewing the Safe Harbor framework, it is imperative that both sides seek to develop a more integrated transatlantic market for data flows to accelerate the growth of the digital economy. 

It is with this aim that IAB US and IAB Europe today announced principles for a modernized Safe Harbor framework to serve as guidance to US and EU negotiators on the digital advertising industry’s priorities. These principles call for a business environment that is conducive to innovation and economic growth, a balanced approach to economic growth and protection of personal data, increased legal certainty for companies, and coherence with US and EU laws. 

The principles also highlight the importance of US and EU trade negotiations that are currently underway as a means to furthering the success of the transatlantic digital economy for years to come.

IAB US and IAB Europe will continue to leverage the IAB Global Network to push for a workable framework that ensures the responsible flow of data between the world’s two largest digital marketplaces.

About the Authors

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Randall Rothenberg

Randall Rothenberg is President and Chief Executive Officer, IAB



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Townsend Feehan

Townsend Feehan is Chief Executive Officer, IAB Europe






 
Following efforts in the content marketing and native advertising space, the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) continued with the October 21 Town Hall focused on best practices for user-generated content (UGC). Brands, publishers and agencies gathered at the IAB Ad Lab to present UGC case studies, offer tips on successful UGC strategies and discuss legal concerns involved.

Susan Borst, Director of Industry Initiatives, IAB, opened the Town Hall by welcoming members and guests before highlighting the benefits of UGC available to all players in the digital ecosystem. Borst defined the terms of the debate and outlined what qualifies as UGC sources noting that UGC can be either paid or organic. 

User-Generated Content Best Practices 
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Eryn Ivey, Account Director/NE, Izea, and Michael Sadicario, Chief Sales Officer, Storyful spoke about how user-generated content works, what the benefits are, and where the industry is headed. Sadicario and Ivey offered five tips for brands and publishers exploring UGC strategy:
  1. Analyze the content ecosystem - from sites of interest and user relationships desired to metrics and questions of attribution, the process involves homework.
  2. Celebrate fans (with contests, repurposing content) and explore different types of compensation.
  3. Identify other sites where users engage with your brand and “trend” there.
  4. Set internal goals (KPIs) and promote user engagement.
  5. Learn how to engineer content - leveraging UGC in real time is key, as is knowing when to sit out the content storm.

Justin Garrity, President, Postano/TigerLogic, offered 10 tips on executing user-generated content campaigns. Garrity highlighted lessons learned in UGC including how to set ground rules, ideas to leverage influencer content and best practices on everything from hashtags (they can’t work alone!) to selfies (they need props!).

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On the brand safety best practices front, Tom O’Brien, National Advertising Director, Disqus, reviewed  some well-known “hashtag horror stories” that can occur with UGC and highlighted how brands use commenting platforms such as Disqus to leverage their “ability to mitigate and pre-moderate” UGC discussion by setting the terms. O’Brien cited a 2013 Adobe study that showed a rise in consumer commenting and highlighted brands that are using the Disqus commenting platform successfully such as Dove with the “Real Beauty” campaign. He also noted that it is the publisher or brand site that sets the level of moderation based on their needs.

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Insights from UGC Case Studies
There are many executions of UGC campaigns from crowd-sourced content, influencer campaigns/sponsored social, user reviews and comments, UGC for events and intelligence and so much more.  IAB members and special guests highlighted case studies, including some legal considerations for their campaigns.

New IPSOS Research & Why Hershey’s is Sweet on Authentic UGC
Anna Lingeris, Sr. Manager, Brand Public Relations & Consumer Engagement, The Hershey Co., presented the first case study. Lingeris described her company’s approach when looking to leverage user-generated content in promoting Hershey’s Spreads. After a great deal of pre-launch discovery, Hershey “primed the pump” by planting seeds in search engines and establishing parameters of the conversation. Lingeris explained how Hershey leveraged UGC generated by the campaign with Crowdtap to inform future marketing strategies in a technique named later as a best practice. 

Anna Kassoway, CMO, Crowdtap, offered the audience results of the 2014 Ipsos MediaCT study sponsored by Crowdtap and SMAC that demonstrated what user-generated content means to millennials. As one would imagine, UGC is an essential part of daily life for this consumer base. The study showed that millennials are spending over 5 hours per day with user-generated content. Millennials considered UGC 50 percent more trustworthy than other media and 35 percent more memorable than other media.

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A Lens into Earned Media With Canon and Klout
Monica Patterson, Supervisor of Internet Marketing, Canon, presented the next case study with Jon Dick, Sr. Director of Marketing, Klout. From the Project Imagination short film series with Ron Howard to the Pixma Pro City Senses events, Canon has found user-generated content a natural fit for its products. In fact, Canon saw a huge spike in engagement during the City Sense events of 2013 and 2014, with its Pixma Pro line being the beneficiary.

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Publisher TimeOut New York Crowd Sources Instagram Fans for Content
Mike Kelly, Digital Marketing Director, Time Out North America, presented a case study on taking user-generated online content and using it in a print medium - the magazine’s cover. Time Out New York ran an Instagram contest asking for user photos from restaurants the magazine nominated for its annual food and drink awards. Instagram users were more than happy to oblige, with over 1,000 entries along with a 40 percent increase in Instagram engagement over six months as a result of the contest. Retweets to 31 million followers highlighted the success of the foray into UGC.

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How Industry Reviews Helped the Travel Industry Take Flight
David Elkins, Director of Sales, TripAdvisor, presented a case study for a company whose content is exclusively user-generated. Elkins related the findings of a Cornell University study showing why travel brand owners are paying as much attention as consumers. Higher review scores allowed hotel owners to charge 11 percent more than their lower-rated competition without lowering occupancy rates. He then showed how travel brands are using TripAdvisor reviews on their own sites and even in their own advertising. 

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Wrapping up the session as it relates to UGC legal considerations, Borst stressed that it is always best to consult your legal team with any questions prior to engaging any UGC campaign. There are many factors that need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The audience stated a strong desire to elaborate on the topic of “legal considerations” in future IAB initiatives.

View the full Town Hall presentation deck and the UGC Digital Simplified overview.

About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst


Reporting by Eric Schaal, IAB Editorial 


 
I’ve been thinking a lot about the global impact of the mobile media revolution lately. Advertising Week brings with it IAB’s annual Global Summit, a gathering of representatives from IAB branches worldwide. In conjunction with that event we have published our third annual anthology of IAB mobile perspectives, The State of the Mobile World.

For 2013, IABs in 30 countries participated—more than double our previous editions, providing a truly global view.  Where our Global Mobile Ad Revenue study provides the cold-hard-cash point of view on the mobile regionally and globally, State of the Mobile World offers a more nuanced, qualitative picture.

And what is the state of the mobile world? Well, growing—the participation of more and more IAB’s in our anthology project underscores how important mobile is becoming across national and regional divides. But beyond overall growth, mobile is very diverse from country to country, and depends on whether the dominant mobile technologies are feature phones or smartphones, and slower data speeds or mobile broadband. Below are a few common themes that I discern.

  • Marketers are playing catch-up. Whatever the state of mobile itself in a given country, in every market it feels like consumers lead the way, media companies are doing their best to follow, and agencies and brands, on average, tend to lag a bit, puzzled by mobile or unsure how to respond to the shift of the digital audience to phones and tablets.
  • Location gets people excited. Regardless of the phase or state of mobile adoption, location is the universal unique selling point of mobile. It’s the thing that piques marketers’ interest, and first sparks creative thinking about mobile’s possibilities as a distinct medium.
  • Video is coming up fast. Many participating IABs also cited video as a major mobile opportunity. This makes perfect sense, since video content is abundant and, assuming networks can handle it, an attractive content type for mobile consumers.
  • Improving creative is our common task. In terms of industry challenges, better ad formats was very common, and clearly a place where the global network of IABs needs to focus our efforts over the next 12 months. Building future-proof mobile creative is a huge challenge, but collaboratively the IABs are poised to meet this challenge in the coming year.

We hope the IAB State of the Mobile World provides a useful reference for anyone looking to learn more about mobile’s evolution across countries and continents.


About the Author

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 

 

A Conversation with Nick Law, Global Chief Creative Officer, R/GA, and IAB MIXX Awards Judge

This past May at the What Works & Why in Digital Advertising: Insights from the IAB MIXX Awards event, Nick Law described his thinking on the alchemy needed in today’s digital world to achieve creative success. Although he took just five minutes to lay out his thesis, it crystallized for me the answer to a question I had been furiously pondering over the past four years: what is the right creative model to achieve the level of brilliance in the digital world that marketers have come to expect of the best agencies in the analog one?  I wasn’t the only one who found his thinking revelatoryNL2.jpg; I saw dozens of pens busily scribbling during his short talk. 

While Nick was at the IAB Ad Lab in New York to judge the 2014 IAB MIXX Awards, I asked him for a chat about this notion so we could share his thoughts with the industry. Our conversation is captured below and in the accompanying video.

Peter Minnium (PM), IAB: R/GA has a unique model of deploying talent in teams to get the best results; can you tell us the genesis of this thinking?

Nick Law (NL), R/GA: About a decade ago, I looked at the creative skill sets that we had at what was then a very different R/GA, and it occurred to me that if you were to be brutal in your division of skill sets, you would cleave the world into storytelling and systematic thinking. The important point about this realization, as much as understanding that these two ways of thinking exist, was to recognize that  are both creative ways of thinking. So if you’re from Madison Avenue, over the last 50 years, what has been considered creative is storytelling, because the mediums that we’ve used are narrative mediums. And since the advent of digital, this type of architectural and spatial way of thinking has become very important. In the advertising world, I think the problem is that this hasn’t been considered creative. It’s been relegated to a sort of an executional or technical path.

So when people talk about the “big idea” in advertising, they still really refer to the ability to tell a story and to distill a brand down to a little narrative. And when they think about this sort of interactive, they think about it from a technical point of view. So then, having come up with the big idea, they wonder how to push that down into this new set of formats and channels. But what I realized was that the sort of creativity associated with systematic thinking was very powerful and very different. 


PM:
Why is the distinction between the different skills sets important?

NL: This is an important thing to recognize, because if you don’t recognize the difference between storytelling and systematic thinking as sort of categorically different ways of thinking, then creators—because they’re all vain and because there’s this sort of hubris associated with creative people—will say that because they’re creative, they should be doing it all, right? So I would have an instance where someone who grew up designing interfaces and was a systematic thinker couldn’t wait to get over to the content studio and do a film, even though for 10 years, that wasn’t the way they thought. And vice-versa. I think that early on in this sort of emergent digital world, there were many creative executions that came from an art director/copywriter type of narrative team, which in a systematic world, failed dismally, right? I won’t mention any big platforms, but there’s quite a few. And a lot of money was wasted. 

PM: Are people born Systemic or Narrative Thinkers?

NL: So if you look at a human brain—and I sort of found out later that we don’t know a lot about neuroscience—we do know that the left-hand brain processes things sequentially and that the right-hand brain processes things simultaneously. So it’s this play between time and space, between the temporal way of thinking and the spatial way of thinking. Therefore, it stands to reason that if you’ve been doing something and you’ve gotten good at something from a creative point of view, the paths in your brain are in a very specific place. So for me, that explains why it’s very difficult for a narrative thinker to connect and design a systematic piece of work, and vice versa because they’re in a habit. 

PM: Bill Bernbach revolutionized creative teams in the 1960’s by pairing art directors and copywriters. Is the model different now?

NL: So at R/GA at least, we think that the atomic team is not an art director and a copywriter, but rather a storyteller and a systematic thinker. Another way of looking at this is as a tension. Storytelling is the act of simplifying, because it’s about the revealed moment and good storytelling, good brand storytelling, is really about that distilled moment and how it’s revealed. And there’s this tension between that simplicity and the possibility provided by systematic thinking. So systematic thinkers are good, very good at possibility because they understand how each node plays with each other and can look at all these relationships simultaneously and generate many ideas. 

So when you have a systematic thinker and a narrative thinker, you get this lovely tension between simplicity and possibility. When that is absent, when all you have is simplicity, you just have simple brand storytellers, really just a lucid brand but without innovation. And when you just have systematic thinkers’ input of possibility, then you get really interesting and multiple tactics that don’t ladder up to a simple brand idea. So that’s how I can tell whether or not we have the balance right—whether things are simple but not innovative, or innovative but not lucid. That balance becomes very important, that interplay. This doesn’t mean that underneath that organizing principle, we don’t have all sorts of different combinations: art directors, copywriters, data scientists, and strategists, and all sorts of other combinations, but that’s the sort of balance we’re trying to achieve, between storytelling and systematic thinking.

PM: Thanks, Nick; I now better understand the magic behind the award winning work at R/GA.

To learn more about creativity in digital advertising download the IAB MIXX Awards 2013 Insights Report: What Works & Why, which showcases examples of award winning digital advertising campaigns and the genius behind the creative work from thought leaders across the industry.

About the Author
peter-minnium-headshot.jpgPeter Minnium 

As the Head of Brand Initiatives at IAB, Peter Minnium leads a series of initiatives designed to address the under-representation of creative brand advertising online. He can be reached on Twitter @PeterMinnium.

 
The IAB is only as strong as its members. 

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Each month IAB selects a member company who has demonstrated both exceptional leader and learner roles due to their elevated participation in IAB activities. Member participation in our initiatives not only empowers committees & councils to create industry-wide accepted specifications, guidelines and best practices, but also gives member companies and individuals the opportunity to have their voice heard and receive visibility for their efforts. 

This month we spoke with Tremor Video, who has taken advantage of Town Hall speaking opportunities, Webinar attendance, Digital Content NewFronts, Quality Assurance Guidelines and much more. 


What does your company do, and specifically how does it serve the digital ecosystem?
At Tremor Video we’re transforming the video advertising experience across all screens for our clients. In a nutshell, we are a tech company that really understands brand advertising for video.

We’ve developed a technology platform, VideoHub®, which offers advertisers and publishers a complete programmatic solution to reach and engage consumers while providing new insights into what drives brand performance across screens.

We operate a complete digital ad tech stack for video, meaning we offer solutions for both advertisers and publishers, ranging from ad serving, to buying & selling inventory, to analytics.

The digital ecosystem has evolved to a point where a screen-specific approach is not the most effective way for marketers to reach their target audiences, so we’re helping them reach consumers in a screen-agnostic world.  


What initiatives is Tremor Video looking forward to working with the IAB and its member companies on; and how do you motivate your colleagues to get involved?
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Tim Ware, Head of Mobile/CTV Sales, Tremor Video
We work closely with the IAB to develop guidelines around a number of initiatives, including quality assurance, measurement and innovative new ad units.

As the head of mobile and CTV sales, I’m most looking forward to elevating the importance of mobile creative to showcase how effective mobile video advertising is as consumption continues to grow, particularly in tablets for 2015. I’m also looking forward to teaming with the IAB to work with affiliated industry groups like MRC as we develop Advanced TV measurement and best practices. Advanced TV combines the best of digital and TV advertising capabilities and we’re at an exciting time where over 83M US consumers are watching content on them.

Motivating my colleagues to get involved with the IAB isn’t hard because everyone fully understands the value and insights one can gain from participating. The IAB offers so many different options to get involved at any level and time commitment. Tremor Video holds seats on a number of committees and councils as well. 

 
How have you leveraged a leadership role at IAB over the past year and what was your take-away from the experience?
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Doron Wesly, Head of Market Strategy, Tremor Video
I love to tell stories, especially when I can weave in data nuggets to remind marketers that “consumers” are people just like them. We spend so much time looking at demographics and target audiences, but I like to be the person that gets everyone to take a step back see the big picture. 

Speaking at the IAB at events like the IAB NewFront Lunch, Future of the App Town Hall and upcoming IAB Mixx give me the opportunity to show people what I’ve learned from being on the road and talking to real consumers. 

Seeing the crowd nod their heads and scribble down notes reminds me how important market research is, and the IAB is a wonderful platform to share those learnings.
  
 

How did you participate as a learner at IAB over the past year and what was your take-away from the experience?
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Lisa Tanzosh, Sales Strategy, Buy-Side Platforms, Enterprise
I attended a number of events this past year, including “Using Data & Programmatic to Go Global and Build Brands” which focused on different perspectives and opinions from panelists working in all corners of the industry (agency, publishers, data, platform, etc.). The viewpoints discussed left me with three important takeaways:
    • Transparency is key, but as an industry we need to define - what does it mean to be truly transparent in the programmatic space? 
    • Now that programmatic technologies are in place, let’s find ways to implement more engaging and interactive creative in real time
    • Now that people are getting more comfortable with letting technology do the heavy lifting, we can begin to take advantage of programmatic efficiencies
As Tremor Video continues to improve its programmatic offering, it’s helpful to participate in IAB events that elevate the programmatic conversation and allow publishers, advertisers, and agencies to dig into important industry topics. 




About the Author

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Nicole Horsford

Nicole Horsford is the Member Services Director at IAB.