Results tagged “iab mobile” from IABlog

Mobile Discrepancies: Not as scary as you might think

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Discrepancies are one of the biggest headaches in the digital advertising ecosystem, but they are also something everyone deals with. As the industry has matured, standards have been created and adopted, vendor offerings and tracking have become more consistent, the internet has become faster and more stable and as a result the difference between two parties’ counts has decreased to an acceptable percentage (most of the time). Then, new technology is introduced that stirs the water and discrepancy percentages can become all over the place again. The mobile ecosystem has introduced an array of devices, operation systems and versions, applications and even new behaviors to the mix. Not to mention the inconsistency of a user’s connection when moving around in the physical world.  

All these new variables can be quite intimidating. How would you ever know where to start investigating a mobile discrepancy? Luckily it is not as scary as it sounds.  While it is true there are additional variables to take into consideration, the most common root causes still boil down to the same ones the industry has experienced for years with desktop campaigns: human error, when ad calls are made in the ad serving sequence, and differences in vendors reporting and targeting offerings. 

  • Human Error - The more manual steps needed to launch a campaign, the more room there is for errors to occur which may result in discrepancies. With new vendors and products plus the use of code based HTML5 creatives with many assets instead of a tidy flash file, the mobile marketplace isn’t as automated as the desktop marketplace.
  • Ad Serving Sequencing - Just like with desktop campaigns there are often multiple parties tracking a single campaign. Typically all of the ad calls don’t fire at once, even if they are all tracking the same thing.  Latency and short session time common in mobile make the difference in ad calls a more significant variable than on desktop. 
  • Reporting - Every vendor has their secret sauce to differentiate themselves in the marketplace. Sometimes it has to do with the metrics they measure or how they validate traffic. As the mobile marketplace matures reporting offerings will be become more consistent, but until then it is important to make sure you are comparing the same things across reports.  
  • Targeting - Similar to reporting targeting offerings will differ in their features and capabilities. While this is true for desktop targeting as well there is more variability in mobile such as multiple ways to identify location. 
IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence’s new document Mobile Discrepancies: Exploring common root causes gives more detailed explanations of common discrepancy causes for mobile campaigns. Providing ample time to test and QA campaigns before launch is the most important thing you can do to avoid large discrepancies. It is important to not just test that the creative works, but also confirm all parties are tracking the same thing, especially when working with new partners. If not, it doesn’t matter what device you are running the campaign on, you are comparing apples to oranges. When these differences are discovered it is important to share that knowledge and work together to solve the problem. The more discrepancies causes are understood, the more they can be avoided fostering more trust in the mobile marketplace. 

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About the Author
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Sabrina Alimi

Sabrina Alimi is the Senior Marketing Manager of the IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, where she has a focus on mobile ad operations and key mobile initiatives such as HTML best practices, mobile creative guidelines, discrepancies, and the future of the cookie. In addition, Sabrina leads the IAB’s Local Committee, exploring the opportunities that the use of location unlocks for mobile advertising. Prior to the IAB, Sabrina worked at Microsoft Advertising on the Atlas Media Console where she became a product expert providing technical support to clients and managing bug escalations. She can be reached on Twitter @SabrinaAlimi.

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For marketers just getting their feet wet in mobile, it can be hard to understand return on investment. At the macro level, spending on mobile advertising is booming (new research from IAB and IAB Europe pegs mobile ad revenue at $8.9 Billion USD worldwide in 2012). However, an overly narrow view risks undervaluing the benefits that mobile advertising brings. That’s why we are pleased to unveil the newest IAB Mobile Center web tool: Mobile Value.

Mobile Value enables a holistic view of the multi-channel impact of mobile advertising.  Our calculator consists of a series of simple, fill-in-the-blank web-based forms that invite marketers to input basic data from a recent (or ongoing) campaign—no names or details needed. 

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The Mobile Value tool incorporates five key mobile value-drivers:

  • Calls
  • App downloads
  • Cross device purchases
  • Mobile site visits
  • In-store sales

Of course, not all of these will apply to all campaigns or all marketers, but completing a full circuit of the tool’s components results in a calculation that demonstrates, in dollars and cents, the value a marketer derives from its mobile ad investment.

Complementing each component is a set of measurement tips to help a marketer find (or estimate) the data they need, along with case studies that drive home how each of these components contributes to the total return from mobile advertising.

We’d like to thank our friends at Google for their help creating this tool, and we hope that marketers find it a useful compass as they navigate mobile’s waters!

About the Author 

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Joe Laszlo


Joe Laszlo is Senior Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB.

A room full of top mobile thought leaders gathered at the 5th annual IAB Mobile Marketplace yesterday. The IAB Mobile Marketing of Excellence was honored to lead the full day of keynote speakers, workshops, and town hall discussions on leveraging opportunities in mobile marketing. The time to act on those opportunities is now.

Inspired by an awesome event, I put together a list of 10 tweets from the event highlighting the power of mobile. Don’t hesitate to retweet them out!

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About the Author

Anna Bager


Anna Bager

Anna Bager is Vice President and General Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB. You can tweet her @AnnaBager.

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Touch screens, high-speed data connections, GPS, and accelerometers; the ability to stream video, play games, buy stuff, take photos, and connect with friends through text, social networking, and the classic phone call; a tool for engaging consumers wherever they happen to be. Mobile devices are alive with capabilities. All too often, however, mobile marketing doesn’t take full advantage of this abundance. Not enough people know how to produce powerful brand experiences with the small screen and mobile setting just yet.

That’s why I was absolutely thrilled with the presence of mobile marketing at the 2012 Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival of Creativity. For anyone curious about producing vibrant and effective mobile campaigns, the big two mobile firsts at the 59th year of the annual event—the first-ever mobile awards category and the first-ever all-day forum dedicated to creativity in mobile advertising moderated by our own Randall Rothenberg, President and CEO, IAB—provided valuable instruction and inspiration.

cannes-iab.jpgIAB’s Randall Rothenberg, Anna Bager, and David Doty at Cannes Lions 2012.

At the last session of the historic IAB forum, “Secrets of the Mobile Superstars”, Thomas Fellger, founding partner and CEO at iconmobile, demonstrated how mobile can be used, not just for advertising, but also for innovative types of marketing by showcasing the breakthrough MINI Connected app. Car owners, after downloading the app and plugging their devices into equipped MINIs, can gain access to features like a navigation system, thousands of online radio stations, the ability to scan and post to Facebook, and a dynamic music system that creates an audio experience based on the characteristics of the drive itself. The MINI Connected app literally changes the experience of using the car, building brand loyalty in the process. Also from the stage, Per Holmkvist, Founder and Senior Advisor at Mobiento, told the audience it’s time to move past why mobile and to focus instead on how mobile, and to use apps only to “superserve” consumers. Colleen DeCourcy, CEO and founder of Socalistic, advised marketers to think of mobile as an extension of their brand and product line, to obsess over the nuances of behavior and interaction, and to make mobile the enabler within a larger ecosystem.

At another session, MEC Global highlighted the important notion of mobile first, which means embracing mobile at the very outset of campaign development in order to build out from it and deeply incorporate its capabilities into multi-channel initiatives. The Cannes Gold Mobile Lion winner in the category “Use of Multiple Screens or Networked Mobile Technology,” illustrated the enormous advantages of this type of extensive mobile integration. For the Super Bowl this year, Chevrolet and Goodby Silverstein & Partners designed the Chevy Game Time app to give viewers an incentive to watch the Chevy commercials very closely and to interact with the brand throughout the game. Here’s how it worked: Super Bowl viewers, who were also app users, would answer trivia questions about the brand’s ads during the game—and in return, they’d receive a unique license plate number. If they saw their plate number in a later ad, they had won a car. With a game-inspired app, a car as an incentive to play, and real-time association with content, the brand interacted with 700,000 users.

Cannes attendees were brimming with thoughtful optimism about mobile, and I viewed so many eye-opening examples of best-in-class mobile marketing, I returned to the IAB headquarters even more excited for the IAB Mobile Marketplace event on July 16 and assured that we are doing the right thing by expanding the MIXX Award categories to include both “Mobile Ad” and “Mobile Brand Destination Site.” There’s a demand to see great work; there is ample great work to celebrate and showcase; and there’s no better way to learn what you can do with mobile, than observing what great work others have done.

About the Author

Anna Bager

Anna Bager

Anna Bager is Vice President and General Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB, and was named as one of the top 20 Most Powerful Women in Mobile Advertising by Business Insider. You can tweet her @AnnaBager.

 

A Method to the Mobile Madness

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Mobile media is booming. According to the IAB’s latest figures (released only yesterday), 2011 US mobile ad revenues reached $1.6 billion, up a remarkable 149 percent over 2010.

In addition to tracking the dollars and cents, the IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence has undertaken a series of research briefs looking at the role of mobile in consumers’ lives, especially as it relates to major events (Super Bowl XLVI, holiday shopping). This week, we’ve released the latest piece in that series, looking at mobile and the NCAA’s March Madness 2012 tournament.

For this project, the IAB teamed up with Millennial Media to show that the real winners of the college basketball season were fans who kept their smartphones and tablets by their side. From checking scores and watching highlights to interacting with friends, family and alumni, consumers turned to their mobile devices as a key screen for engaging with content, driving overall traffic on the Millennial Media platform up over 10 percent during the games.

Our survey of over 2,000 U.S. adults reveals that nearly three out of four (79%) March Madness viewers who own mobile devices used them in some way to keep up with the tournament. A significant number of those people (69%) agreed that having a mobile device has made it convenient to follow the tournament, and 21% said that they purchased a mobile app specifically related to March Madness.

For enthusiastic fans of March Madness—people who agreed that they are passionate about the tournament this year because a favorite team was in it—“mobile madness” was even more the norm: 88 percent of them used mobile devices for a March Madness-related activity, and 26 percent said they followed March Madness primarily by using their smartphone.

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Data from Millennial Media’s network uncovered keen usage of mobile during the tournament. On the opening day, when excitement was at its peak, impressions in sports apps were up over 30 percent relative to one week earlier, and from 7-11pm ET, social media app impressions were up over 40 percent. In the early days of the tournament, finance was the leading advertising vertical on the Millennial Media platform, followed by telecom, entertainment and retail & restaurants.

Mobile devices clearly upped the game for fans of March Madness, and these findings should also be relevant looking ahead to similar huge, multiday sporting events like the UEFA Euro 2012 soccer tournament and of course this summer’s Olympic games in London. Brand marketers need to know that mobile should be a key part of their strategy to reach fans effectively during these exciting, engaging events.

About the Author

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Joe Laszlo


Joe Laszlo is Deputy Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB.

Another great Mobile World Congress has come to an end and as always it was even greater and more spectacular than last year. As interesting as the event was, it was challenging to really grasp MWC 2012 as a whole because of the size and mass of things going on at the same time.

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Brands, agencies, technology and operators seemed to be well represented in MWC attendance. While this clearly proves the greatness of mobile right now, it also highlights the problems an event like this faces when it no longer is “just for the tech folks”; there are so many cool things going on and so much networking it becomes almost overwhelming. The top things that stood out to me were:

  1. Less focus on technology and more on features or utility, such as M-Commerce, M-Wallet and Mobile banking. This represents huge opportunities globally—people want their mobile experience to reflect their lives and provide functionality, not just be a cool device. Mobile is no longer just about mobile. It is about media consumption and communication across several devices and platforms, and a tie-in to the way people live their lives across multiple screens.

  2. Regulation was also a continuously recurring topic of discussion. It is clear that the industry needs to show responsibility and start paying even more attention to regulators in order to continue growing, something the IAB Public Policy office in Washington, D.C. is closely working on.

  3. Advertising and monetization of mobile. While that theme was around last year, in 2012 this was actually a conference track. I led a panel in this track, “Mobile Advertising: The Mobile Advertising Ecosystem - Making It Work”, with a fantastic lineup: Google, Huawei, Telenor, Adidas and Initiative. The key takeaway was that the main things we all need to do to drive this forward are: Education, Education and Education and then Evangelization.

  4. 1% women max. Even though the event is getting broader it is somewhat sad to see that it is still hugely male dominated. Especially with the focus on mobile naturally integrated into people’s lives, busy female professionals and the strength of mobile moms are an incredibly powerful demographic opportunity for advertisers to capture.

  5. The Samsung Galaxy Beam projector smartphone. Everyone seemed to talk about this device. It’s fascinating to think about how phones and tablets with projectors can even further change media consumption. Check out MobileBurn.com’s video demo of it here.

Most importantly MWC 2012 was a great party, truly global, friendly, massive and totally worth it. See you at next year’s!

About the Author

Anna Bager

Anna Bager

Anna Bager is Vice President and General Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB. You can tweet her @AnnaBager and follow the IAB on Twitter @IAB.

 

When one considers the current economic climate, there is little doubt we are becoming a global community defined by constant connectivity and ultra-convenience. Mobile devices are a major factor in this as they are now ubiquitous and one’s device fulfils a multitude of requirements, connecting them to a plethora of information and facilitating all types of interactions. Mobile marketing and more specifically, mobile barcodes play a pivotal role in this new world of enhanced communications and on-demand information.

As the IAB’s Mobile Buyer’s Guide points out, mobile barcodes are an important way of activating traditional media, furthermore they can help boost sales, increase customer engagement, build brand loyalty, and educate an audience. These small black and white squares, reminiscent of ink blots, represent a great opportunity for marketers to bring traditionally static marketing and advertising to life so brands can instantly engage with their target audience. For example, adding a mobile barcode to a print or outdoor advertisement, on pack or at shelf that links to a discount, sweepstakes or provides additional information on a product or service provides an opportunity for the brand to engage with their target consumers 24/7/365.  However, to ensure success, the marketers integrating mobile barcodes into their strategies should be mindful of best practices, ensuring that consumers have high quality experiences, conducive to repeat interactions. This positive experience will ultimately lead to increased consumer engagement and customer loyalty, improve ROI and make a significant difference to a brand’s bottom line.

NeoMedia has developed best practices focused on the successful introduction of mobile barcode campaigns globally, to help brand owners and agencies leverage the use of mobile barcodes to ensure the success of all of their mobile barcode initiatives. You can quickly access the best practices on your smartphone by scanning the mobile barcode below using your preferred QR code reader.

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Need a mobile barcode reader? Go to get.neoreader.com on your phone

Here are some additional tips to use when planning your next campaign:

1. Think Holistically

Integrate mobile barcodes into all digital and traditional media to maximize the consumer experience, dialogue and interactivity, ensuring mobile barcodes are planned as a part of the holistic campaign and not simply an afterthought.

2. Think Value and Ease of Use

Consider content that will compel the consumer to interact with your code, a la giveaways, discounts, free tickets and exclusive access. If your code simply offers the customer a chance to view a TV advertisement or link to a website, it may not achieve the results that you desire. Scanning a barcode should provide the consumer with a brand experience that is exclusive, dynamic and interactive - encouraging them to interact with you again.

It is also important to consider where a mobile barcode is located on the ad. Consumers must be able to find it easily and scan it quickly. For outdoor ads, place the code at eye or arm-level. In a print ad, the barcode should not fall over a fold.  Be sure to leave some white space around the code and use a minimum of 1 x 1-inch print specification. For TV or cinema, the code should remain onscreen long enough for the viewer to launch the scanning application and scan the code - a minimum of 15 seconds.

3. Think Reach

Branded or custom QR codes are certainly appealing, but it’s also important to create a code everyone can recognize and easily scan. Producing your code in black and white will increase the number of phones and code readers that can scan it. Also, ensure you use global, open standards (i.e. QR or Datamatrix) to achieve broadest customer reach and maximum impact for your brand.

4. Think Context and Environment

Remember that the consumer who has just scanned your code is mobile. They will be viewing the brand content on a mobile screen and are likely on the go, therefore expecting instant results. Make sure the barcode links through to a mobile-optimized site rather a PC-designed site. Remember that codes that don’t resolve content properly, go nowhere, or deliver the wrong information are the equivalent of a slammed door - the consumer may not try again.

Test the barcode for functionality across a variety of devices and scanner applications before launching. It’s important, especially because the consumers that scan codes are likely tech-savvy and vocal - the kind of consumers you want as brand loyalists.

5. Think ROI

Whatever the campaign, be sure to define goals before integrating a mobile barcode and choose a provider who will enable you to monitor the campaign via a managed barcode management platform.

Mobile barcodes offer an easy means to unlock a relevant, dynamic and interactive experience for consumers. And mobile barcodes are already gaining traction with many high profile brands as marketers begin to realize their value. Indeed, the uses of mobile barcodes are almost limitless, but to ensure consumers continue to interact with mobile barcodes well into the future they must have a positive experience. Essentially, to give your marketing campaign the best chance of success, use mobile barcodes and follow best practice advice!

NeoMedia will be to working with the IAB Mobile Center in the coming year to further educate the market about the best ways to accelerate their member’s mobile barcode efforts. For more info on NeoMedia, visit us at http://www.neom.com.

About the Author

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Laura Marriott

Laura Marriott is a member of the IAB Mobile Advertising Committee and CEO of NeoMedia Technologies,Inc.. You can follow her on Twitter @kanadawomaninus and @NeoMediaInc.

 

The IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence held our second tablet event in the IAB Ad Lab last week. A breakfast session focused on the theme of creativity, this event included some intriguing data from Nielsen, inspirational examples of ads and content pushing the bounds of tablet creativity, and a spirited discussion on what 2012 holds for the tablet.

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That part of the conversation focused on looking ahead particularly caught my attention. The answers varied broadly and included:

  • The rise of the “7-inch” tablet form factor; the question of where smartphones end and tablets begin will be a really interesting and tricky one.

  • The web experience on tablets. Delivering a better web experience, or hybrids of web and app experiences, will be a potential game-changer.

  • Fragmentation and the lack of standardization. A myriad of screen sizes, app user interfaces, and ad formats all combine to make tablets a great creative opportunity, but a tricky and hard-to-scale one, too.

  • The tablet as foundation. Right now tablets enter late in the media conversation. But that could flip: imagine discussions that center on the tablet as the start of the process of designing a new content offering or consumer service.

All great food for thought, and beyond that ongoing issues like the race to be the number 2 tablet, what Apple does next, and how tablets influence and affect overall consumer media consumption behaviors, virtually assure that we’ll have a lot to watch and learn from in the coming year.

The thing that intrigues me about tablets is that, more than any other device today, people see in them any and every device or medium they want to see. For people with a TV heritage, tablets are TVs you can hold in your hands. For people coming from the print world, tablets are the ideal, interactive magazine. And for those from the Internet universe, tablets are the perfect, tactile, portal onto interactive content. And all of these seemingly incompatible views are correct. Tablets really can be all these things, and more.

But given this wonderful, amazing diversity, how do content owners and marketers make sense of the tablet opportunity? As with previous interactive media, this is a place where the IAB can help.

The IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence is turning the Tablet Task Force group into an official Tablet Committee, taking its place alongside the other platform-specific IAB committees. This group will be open to any IAB member company that wants to participate, taking on projects to grow the tablet advertising market and providing an industry-wide forum for discussing how the tablet is evolving as a medium. Interested in joining the Tablet Committee? IAB members please contact Luke Luckett in the IAB Member Services group - we’d love to have you aboard.

About the Author

Joe Laszlo Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Deputy Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB.