Results tagged “digital” from IABlog

Empowered to Say No - The Role of a Compliance Officer

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At the recent Advertising Technology Marketplace conference, I chatted about bad friction and good friction. The IAB Tech Lab was established to reduce friction by enabling standards creation, tools, and standards certification. At the same time, ironically, we also need to manufacture healthy friction to strengthen the barrier of entry.   

Standards do not just create interoperability for growth and shape markets. Standards create layers of transparency that lead to a healthier supply chain. This includes programs supported by IAB, Digital Advertising Alliance, and Trustworthy Accountability Group (TAG).  

This year, I am asking for every company to identify a compliance officer who is an inventory quality and audience specialist.  He or she should have executive powers with the support of the executive committee of the organization. 

Publishers, your compliance officer should know your traffic sources. Organic search, social, and purchased are all forms of sourcing.  The compliance officer should be reviewing the marketing, advertising operations yield management, and audience growth strategies and tactics. For example, if a partnership is growing audience at an unnatural rate for you in the off hours, it is time to find a new partner.  

Platforms, some of you have a compliance officer identified in the TAG programs. He or she should keep weeding out the wolf selling sheep’s wool to create further transparency that we all need and want in business transactions. This individual must be empowered to deny new inventory, recruited by the supply team, that goes against your internal controls and checklist of quality supply. 

Buyers, viewability is the new currency we’re striving toward. Low cost CPMs, even to refresh your audience pool, can harm the efforts to move to the new currency if not executed appropriately. Your compliance officer can help weigh the pros and cons.  

Small companies, take note. You are entering a market with ideas and innovation—a market with growing resources to provide guidance for best business practices and tools. I encourage you to use them.    

If you don’t have a compliance officer, get one. And in your organization, this individual needs to be empowered to say no.  This is not about growing business for the sake of top line revenue alone, it is about growing business the right way, which leads to the health of the bottom line and supply chain. Human Resources departments should support this executive with transparent, educational dialogue to the staff. The compliance officer is visible, public, and a trusted internal source for personnel.  

Finally, if your company uses standards, it’s important to declare your version centrally and keep it up to date with the latest issued in the market. Legacy versions of a standard, or enhancements to a current standard, need to be declared upfront in the pre-sales process. The compliance officer can help with these internal operations and language in your market transactions.  

IAB has a portal for your declaration. I encourage your company to keep this record up to date.  

For more information about the IAB Tech Lab, please visit http://www.iab.net/techlab, and to understand more about IAB Compliance programs, visit http://www.iab.net/guidelines/compliance_programs.


 
Programmatic is the way business is done today. 2014 was a momentous year for programmatic advertising with a large amount of advertisers shifting their budgets into programmatic, as well as continued growth in mobile and video automation. According to eMarketer, automated advertising is expect to reach $20.41 billion, or 63.0% of US digital display ad spending by 2016. Programmatic-technology enabled automation and RTB-auction based internet ad buying are gaining market share, driving the need for universally adopted standards. 

Even with the all the stats supporting the dramatic shift to automation, adoption of the latest version of OpenRTB, a common protocol that enables buy and sell side platforms to talk to each other, has been slow. Many DSPs are still only supporting OpenRTB 2.1, and are shying away from upgrading to OpenRTB 2.3 because they don’t have any immediate plans to break into the Native space. OpenRTB 2.3 isn’t just an industry shaping measure that provides a framework for Native to be transacted on programmatically -  the latest version of OpenRTB also provides significant support in other areas of Real Time Bidding. 

Upgrading to the latest model or software for our phones is a compulsion for many of us. We can’t wait to see what new features and improvements are being offered. It’s very unlikely for one to hesitate upgrading to the latest version of iOS because it has some features you may not have need of at this very moment in time. These upgrades provide more than just an increased feature set, they include bug fixes, improve battery life, and offer a wide variety of quality of life improvements. Yet when it comes to tech specifications, many companies make the mistake by waiting too long to update thinking it’s not relevant or valuable to them. You wouldn’t think twice about upgrading your phone, why would you stall on upgrading to the latest version of OpenRTB? Inventory that could be made available or made more valuable isn’t. Deals that could be made aren’t.  

When it comes to open standards in programmatic, it’s important to think of the bigger picture. As Nitin Gupta, Director, Product Management at Millennial Media puts it, “OpenRTB 2.3 isn’t just about native, it includes native.” In addition to native, the latest version of OpenRTB provides:

  • Significant upgrades that improve the programmatic workflow buyers and sellers
  • An indicator for mobile optimized sites, helping to ensure the right creative is available
  • Support for signaling supported image dimensions/resolutions, allowing bidders to make smarter buying decisions

Bidders should upgrade to OpenRTB 2.3 to take advantage of all the features and clarity brought, in addition to the support for Native.  

In fact, many SSPs are having to put extension options in place to support OpenRTB 2.1. Gupta explains, “Whether you are looking for parameters in 2.3 or extensions objects of 2.2, it requires the same amount of work from a development standpoint.” Regardless of whether or not a DSP has native aspirations in the immediate future, it’s important to note that all the additional fields that have been added in OpenRTB are optional. If you are interested in pixel ratio, you don’t have to go around looking for extensions and partners, it’s supported in OpenRTB 2.3. You can reap the benefits of 2.3 at the same short term cost as making 2.1 support features the marketplace demands - and be better positioned to adopt future iterations.

So if you already planned on upgrading your existing version of OpenRTB, take a note from your personal life. I encourage your product and engineering team to go that extra mile; skip OpenRTB 2.2 and upgrade to OpenRTB 2.3 - you’ll be surprised at all the improvements you didnt even know were there!



About the Author

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Melissa Gallo

Melissa Gallo is Director of Product, Programmatic Automation and Data in the IAB Technology Lab, at the IAB.

 



 
The digital advertising ecosystem has often been portrayed with excessively complex diagrams featuring hundreds of logos and arrows indicating multiple flows and directions.

Yes, it is complicated — significantly more so than analog media — but it is not so foreign as to be unrecognizable to the trained marketer. Each additional capability merely adds new tools to help agencies, publishers, and marketers apply their skills more effectively.

As part of our Digital Simplified series we set out to, well, simplify the depiction of this valuable system with The IAB Arena. The resulting “Arena” illustration is designed to portray, from a marketer’s perspective, how advertising messages are delivered to consumers in the vibrant and ever-expanding ecosystem of digital advertising.

We just launched an interactive video of the Arena powered by Rapt Media, created for professionals and students of all levels to learn how the different players, parts and technology work together to create, sell, distribute and measure digital advertising. Users can easily navigate around the six Arena rings to select the parts of the ecosystem they’d like to learn more about. There is also an interactive diagram that explains the Arena at a higher level.  
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As all media is increasingly delivered in on-demand, digital formats, the concepts and businesses that form the rings of the IAB Digital Advertising Arena will apply throughout the industry.

In a very short while, television will include addressable advertising elements, and ads will be served by computer systems that track interaction with the ads rather than just reach. Functions and capabilities developed for what was then known as “digital” will just be “media.”

The IAB Arena serves as a roadmap to the future of how all advertising will ultimately reach and impact consumers. Smart marketers, agencies, and publishers that are investing today to ensure their teams are experts across the Arena will reap benefits far into the future.

View the IAB Arena and video: iab.net/iabarena

Learn about other Digital Advertising subjects with IAB’s Digital Simplified: iab.net/simplified


About the Author
peter-minnium-headshot.jpgPeter Minnium 

As the Head of Brand Initiatives at IAB, Peter Minnium leads a series of initiatives designed to address the under-representation of creative brand advertising online. He can be reached on Twitter @PeterMinnium.







 

U.S. Hispanic Millennial Moms Maximize Mobile

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In February 2015, IAB and BabyCenter published 2015 State of Modern Motherhood: Mobile and Media in the Lives of Moms, a look at U.S. millennial moms and the central role that mobile plays in the things they buy and the media they watch. We decided to dive back into the data for another look, this time specifically at Hispanic millennial moms, to compare how their use of mobile and media stacks up against the average millennial mom. Unless otherwise noted, references to “moms” throughout this post refer specifically to U.S. moms in the millennial generation, aged 18-32 years old.

The Hispanic population is one of the most important demographic groups in the United States today. Among moms this is particularly true: 23 percent of all U.S. births are to Hispanic women. So any marketer looking to reach moms needs to understand Hispanic moms, and tailor their message accordingly, or they risk missing almost one in four of their target audience.

The Digital Toolbox is Key for Hispanic Moms
The data clearly indicate just how important digital media are for Hispanic moms looking for parenting related advice or insights. Seventy-one percent of Latina millennial moms whose primary language spoken at home is Spanish (going forward, we’ll call these moms “Spanish-preferred,” and we’ll call Hispanic moms whose primary language spoken at home is English, “English-preferred”) seek expert advice on parenting websites weekly or more often, as compared to 60% of moms in that demo who prefer English, and only 49% of  moms in general. This holds true for an array of other digital media.  Among Spanish-preferred Hispanic moms, 60% turn to mom blogs, 52% turn to other parents on parenting social media, and 45% look to parenting or baby apps, all much higher than the average mom. While the digital world is important for all moms in the coveted millennial age group, it is particularly so for those who are Hispanic.

Even more than PC/laptop-based digital, mobile is the key medium for Latina moms. As the table below shows, PC ownership drops for Hispanic moms relative to moms in general, and indeed, the Spanish-preferred segment is almost equally likely to own a tablet as a laptop/PC. Moreover, 36 percent of Latina moms rely on a mobile device (smartphone or tablet) as their sole internet connection—more than 2.1 times the rate of moms overall. Clearly, even more so than for the average millennial mom, Latina moms are already leading mobile-first, and sometimes even mobile-only, lives.

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Hispanic Mom Media Time Goes Very Mobile
As a mobile-first demographic, it’s unsurprising that Hispanic moms spend even more media time on their mobiles than the average mom does. While millennial moms estimate they spend about 2.8 hours daily online via smartphone or tablet, English-preferred Latina moms in that generation spend 3.2 hours, and those who prefer Spanish spend 4 hours online that way. In fact, the latter group spends 37% of their media time with mobile.

Spanish-preferred Hispanic moms make heavy use of both TV and mobile media, reporting about 11 hours of total daily media time, as compared to 8.9 hours for moms overall.

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Of course, the only way a busy mom could possibly spend that much time with media is through significant multitasking, and Hispanic moms are true experts at that. About 53 percent of this demo always or often use their smartphones while also watching TV, comparable with moms overall. One area where Hispanic moms are distinctive is in watching online video while watching TV. While 33% of moms overall watch online video on their phones while watching TV, the number jumps to 42% with Latinas.

But Hispanic Moms Present Untapped Mobile Shopping Opportunity
While they have definitely embraced mobile media, Hispanic millennial moms do surprisingly little mobile shopping. For example, 51% of moms overall say they use their mobiles in-store to help them search for better prices, as compared to 42% of English-preferred Hispanic moms, and only 39% of those who prefer Spanish.

Similarly, although 62% of moms overall look for and download mobile coupons, only 31% of the Hispanic segment does, and while 44% of U.S. moms search for and read product reviews, and 40% of English-preferred Latina moms do so, and only 27% of those that prefer Spanish use this mobile capability.

We think this is a big untapped opportunity for marketers to influence Latina moms’ shopping habits via mobile. This adoption gap would quickly close if Hispanic millennial moms were more aware of such services and capabilities, and if they were more widely available in Spanish. Marketers should not overlook the opportunity to make this demographic more mobile-shopping savvy.

Digital Advertising is a Great Way To Attract Hispanic Moms’ Attentions
In the “2015 State of Modern Motherhood” report, IAB and BabyCenter observed that millennial moms were much more likely than Gen X moms to say they frequently notice digital and mobile ads. That’s even more true of Hispanic millennial moms. Fifty-six percent of them say they frequently notice digital (laptop/PC, smartphone, or tablet) ads, as compared to 44% of millennial moms overall. And over half (52%) of Hispanic moms frequently notice mobile ads, as compared to only 37% of all moms. That is on par with the percentage of Hispanic moms who said they notice TV ads (50%). Clearly, for marketers reaching this important segment of U.S. moms, mobile is a key media channel.

About the Authors

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 




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Julie Michaelson

Julie Michaelson, Head of Global Sales at BabyCenter.

 


 
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Brand marketers have long understood the power of audio messaging to connect with audiences. Whether delivered in a music, news, sports or political talk environment, the use of audio ads is experiencing a renaissance as advertisers take advantage of digital offerings that provide listeners with greater choice, control and customization of their experience. The result is a highly personal and exclusive advertising experience that creates a natural opportunity for brand alignment. 

Such an alignment makes digital audio a powerful tool for just about any marketer looking to reach virtually any type of audience. Here are 5 reasons that digital audio should be a part of every marketer’s media mix: 


1.  Digital Audio is exclusive. 
The digital audio market represents an environment with generally fewer advertising interruptions, while providing similar deep targeting capabilities as other digital ad units. Exclusively available within an audio content experience, digital audio ads are often native and “above the fold”, and given their nature, often have a very high share of voice. 

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2.  Digital Audio is becoming a “mobile-first” experience for many. 
The speed with which connected mobile devices have proliferated over the last few years is having a profound impact on consumer consumption of audio content. In fact, streaming radio comes out as a top activity for smartphones users, according to 2014 research by comScore and Millennial Media. 

Digital audio’s mobile ascendency began by adding new listening contexts. Enabled by “earbuds”, consumers were freed to listen during an array of activities traditionally void of audio companionship. The growth trajectory has increased as historical audio contexts like in-office and at-home have been disrupted by simple-to-use and more personalized experiences delivered through a broad variety of devices. 

Most recently, digital audio has gained traction as an in-vehicle choice, and as consumers turn to newer models at all pricing tiers they are finding connected technology a key differentiator in the car-purchase process. Simply put, in-car access leads to significant behavior change. 

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3.  Digital Audio is cool, because the consumer is now in control. 
Just about everyone seems to have chatted about Serial around the water cooler these past few months. Even well known musician and Oscar-winning actor Jared Leto told IAB’s 2014 MIXX audience all about what the power of sound has meant to him as an individual, and as a musician. 

As a consumer, audio has always provided a broad range of content offerings that cater to whatever mood you might be in. Today’s digital audio offerings build on that value proposition by offering listeners the freedom to select what to hear and when they want to listen, to match their moods. 

Maybe you’re into the latest podcasts on relationships, your favorite baseball team, or the latest episodic craze. Maybe you’re jammin’ to that fresh new indie-pop station you found over the weekend, or you’re feeling introspective listening to the remastered Dark Side of The Moon in its entirety. 

With mobile poised to become the device-of-choice for accessing audio content, such content becomes an extension of your mood and builds a background to your day. Underwriting such essential components to consumers’ lives can create impressive lifts in awareness, sales, and changes to long-held preferences. 


4.  Digital Audio is growing like crazy.  
As audio consumption shifts from AM/FM radios to smartphones and connected devices, the demand for digital audio is growing rapidly. Edison Research and Triton Digital’s Infinite Dial 2015 study showed that 143 Million Americans listened to online radio and streamed audio content in the past month, including 61% of all 25-54 year-olds. Digital audio has not only arrived; it has become a mainstream media.


5. Digital Audio compliments any media plan. 
For marketers, digital audio provides a necessary, unique, highly measurable and highly accountable component of the media mix.

Mobile audio also has a distinct advantage over other media because it can easily be consumed while on the go. “Ultramobile” activities such as driving, walking, exercising and working don’t allow for visual advertising engagement. 

In fact, Nielsen estimates that 79% of audio consumption takes place while people are engaged in activities where visual media cannot reach them. Such opportunities now create scale with millennials on their own, or in combination with legacy audio choices for broader demographics.

The IAB, along with members of the Digital Audio Committee, have pursued a goal of educating marketers and agencies about digital audio advertising opportunities, and discussing best practices and guidelines for reducing operational costs while driving sector growth. With the release of today’s IAB Digital Audio Buyer’s Guide, we aim to dive further into these points and answer questions that creatives, planners and buyers have about investment in digital audio advertising. 

Happy reading!


 

Adopting Encryption: The Need for HTTPS

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It’s time to talk about security. 

In fact, last year was the time to talk about security. From The New York Times to Google, the call went out for websites to encrypt communications with their users, protecting the integrity and privacy of information exchanged in both directions. Even the U.S. government heard this call, and is working to require HTTPS delivery of all publicly accessible Federal websites and web services.

This year, the advertising industry needs to finish catching up. Many ad systems are already supporting HTTPS - a survey of our membership late last year showed nearly 80% of member ad delivery systems supported HTTPS. That’s a good start, but doesn’t reflect the interconnectedness of the industry. A publisher moving to HTTPS delivery needs every tag on page, whether included directly or indirectly, to support HTTPS. That means that in addition to their ad server, the agency ad server, beacons from any data partners, scripts from verification and brand safety tools, and any other system required by the supply chain also needs to support HTTPS.

Let’s break that down a bit more - once a website decides to support HTTPS, they need to make sure that their primary ad server supports encryption. That ad server will sometimes need to include tags from brand safety, audience and viewability measurement, and other tools - all of which also need to support encryption. The publisher’s ad server will often direct to one of several agency ad servers, each of which will also need to serve over HTTPS. Each agency ad server also may include a variety of beacons or tags, depending on how the deal was set up, all of which similarly need to have encrypted versions available. That’s a lot of dependencies - and when one fails to support HTTPS, the website visitor’s experience is impacted, initiating a costly search for the failure point by the publisher.

While the need to support HTTPS delivery will only continue to grow, getting there isn’t as simple as flipping a switch. As those who have already adopted know, there’s management overhead with acquiring certificates and making sure these don’t expire, increased resource requirements on servers to handle the encryption, and other costs. Carnegie Mellon has a great paper on some of the more esoteric impacts of adopting HTTPS. It’s therefore important that you communicate your experiences developing support for encrypted delivery with those who haven’t.

A core function of HTTPS is to prove the origin of a resource delivered from a server to the web browser. Each server delivering encrypted content has to acquire a certificate that’s signed by a trusted authority and issued to their specific domain. This results in a larger set of consistent identifiers for servers, which has beneficial implications in the fight against malware - it’s more expensive for malware peddlers to set up shop on an HTTPS server, and easier to identify the same peddler across occurrences.

Adopting encryption on public-facing servers is an important step in protecting the privacy and security of the public. It also sets the stage for broader support of server-to-server encryption, securing our business communications from eavesdropping when they’re routed over the public internet. Here at the IAB, we feel that broad support for HTTPS on public servers is a best practice for the industry, and that encrypted communications and strong origin identifiers are of growing importance as we tackle issues of fraud, malware, and piracy as a part of the Trustworthy Accountability Group (TAG).  

About the Author

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Brendan Riordan-Butterworth

Brendan Riordan-Butterworth is the Director of Technical Standards at IAB.




 

Top 5 Trends in Digital Out of Home

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We tend to spend a lot of time outside and on-the-go, getting from one place to the next. It’s no surprise, then, that the average global consumer is exposed to various Digital Out of Home Media for 14 minutes per week, and investments in the space are expected to grow 14.2% year-over-year between 2011 - 2017. New York City’s Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan has recently reopened, accommodating up to 300,000 daily riders and boasting more than 50 digital screens available for marketers. The largest and most expensive digital billboard debuted in Times Square this past November, with just as many pedestrians expected to pass through the area daily. The overlapping powers of digital, mobile, outdoor, and Out of Home content seem to be stepping up.

Digital Out of Home (or “DOOH” as the channel is commonly referred) encompasses a variety of screen shapes, sizes, and levels of interactivity. From digital billboards and signs on taxis, to digital signage at airport gates and gyms and waiting rooms, these varieties underline a necessary bridge between context and location in relevance and favorable recall - vital components of any media campaign. The IAB sees norms and expectations from the online advertising world informing and expediting the growth of DOOH, and the IAB’s Digital Out of Home Taskforce launched this past fall with aims to define the DOOH channel while positioning its place within the larger interactive advertising industry.

As we collectively say “hello” to 2015, the Taskforce shares its thoughts on the Top 5 Trends in DOOH.
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photo courtesy of Luke Luckett, IAB Consultant

“Top 5 Trends in Digital Out of Home”

1. Cross-platform targeting opportunities are on the rise. As mobile devices become more advanced and ubiquitous, the proliferation of captive digital screens in home and out of home has been growing. Interactions with consumers have become more prominent via new mobile technologies like NFC, beacons and more accurate geofencing capabilities. Such technologies may allow a marketer to personalize the consumer’s experience and even allow for immediate interaction.

2. DOOH will provide increasingly relevant messages in locations that matter. The amount of time spent outside and in transit is increasing in many regions.  New forms of targeting and subsets have made the art of reaching specific audience segments in ideal locations easier - and in our highly distracted modern experience, a consumer’s receptivity to new concepts outside the home can be highly impactful. In fact, a recent study by YuMe and IPG Media Lab found that consumers are 41% more receptive to advertising in public places than at home, and 16% more receptive at school/work than at home. As a consumer, the device you carry with you creates a natural tie-in to your visual experience outdoors, and relevant DOOH messages enhance the value via existing screens throughout popular locations.

3. Data is (literally) where it’s at, locally and programmatically. According to BIA/Kelsey, marketers spent $1.4 billion on location-targeted mobile campaigns in 2012. By 2017, spending on location-targeted mobile advertising will reach $10.8 billion, representing a 52% share of all mobile ad dollars. (In fact, next month the IAB’s Location Data Working Group will release a primer on using location data for attribution and ad effectiveness.) DOOH is benefiting from this rapidly growing segment, using big data to reach the same mobile consumer on larger, higher impact screens and enabling marketers to craft cross-screen, location-based strategies to maximize the impact of advertising to consumers outside the home.       

At the same time, finding scale and ease of buying in DOOH is being made easier through programmatic conversations and data-driven media buying. Programmatic solutions are developing in DOOH, and are leading to a deeper connection with the mobile and interactive marketplaces. Programmatic DOOH has the potential to drive standardization and reduce overall fragmentation in the marketplace. The 1st and 3rd party data sets that allow buyers and sellers to better define audiences exposed to DOOH media is also rapidly evolving. Programmatic bidding enables buyers to more accurately target the most appropriate audience, while sellers benefit from yield optimization of their media assets.

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photo courtesy of Outfront Media

4. Out of Home creates a unique canvas for top-notch creativity. From street furniture and cinema ads to augmented reality and live experiences on outdoor screens and vehicles - the ability to build awareness and drive impressive results is getting easier in DOOH. Whether it’s part of a larger cross-media effort or a locally focused campaign, DOOH offers opportunities to reach a unique audience, creating unexpected parallels between location (as content and backdrop) and messaging. DOOH has huge potential to drive immediate impact and scale close to point of purchase; it also can garner award-winning praise and even the Direct Grand Prix at Cannes

5. There is a rise of new measurement and addressability opportunities in DOOH. New location and mobile data sets are leading to new ways of measuring attribution in experiential and out of home media. Location, as an audience definer, is just as important to DOOH as it is to mobile advertisers. Retargeting in the real world is more than just copying the online model; the best context is location - where we are and who we are. It is about delivering real-world context and campaign messages that are close to point of purchase. A consumer’s exposure to these mediums can now be verified beyond the self-reported opportunity to see, improving marketers’ confidence in their ability to isolate the impact of DOOH from other mediums in the cross-channel mix

Looking forward, the space is heating up. The number of digitally connected screens is growing, and all signals indicate that inventory and creative options in digital out of home media will continue to grow. Watch this space as the IAB and its DOOH Taskforce combine the talents of key players with out-of-home, mobile, local, and video expertise to build and expand upon this growth.
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photo courtesy of Titan
 

About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst

- See more at: http://www.iab.net/iablog/2014/04/GIF.html#sthash.jts7rfyl.dpuf
Tsusanblogpic.jpghe year 2014 marked an important turning point for game advertising … for all the right reasons. Driven by new technology and social and mobile adoption, the gamer landscape has rapidly evolved. The evidence is clear that the demographics for games are more inclusive than ever with time spent playing growing at an unprecedented rate. And now more than ever, savvy marketers are viewing games as valuable and highly engaging content that fits in both content marketing and paid advertising strategies. 

The IAB’s new “Games Advertising Ecosystem Guide” was developed to help marketers and agencies understand today’s game play, the core game types and advertising categories to reach consumers. The guide provides an overview of today’s game play and a summary of the game advertising system outlining:

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  • The evolving and dynamic gamer landscape and trends 
  • The two main categories of games that can be played across multiple devices
  • The three main types of advertising formats available to marketers and agencies with examples
  • The most common performance models
  • The most common revenue models
  • The future evolution of game advertising

On the importance of this guide, Sandro Camarao of MediaBrix, who led the Game Advertising Ecosystem Guide working group said: It is important for buyers to understand how to leverage gaming content for maximum brand impact. Gaming has grown exponentially, and with its growth, new opportunities for brands to forge emotional connections with key audiences. The IAB Games Ecosystem Guide comes at a critical time for buyers who are determining how best to integrate gaming into their media plan.  

IAB Game Committee co-chairs added:
quotesnew.PNGIn looking forward to 2015, the IAB Games Committee will take deeper dives into each of the three main types of advertising formats to provide more guidance for marketers and agencies who seek to deploy game advertising in their content marketing strategy and media mix.

On a related note:  Be sure to check out the IAB’s recent (11/14) research study “Mobile Gamers:  Who They Are, How They Shop, and How to Reach Them.” This report examines the behaviors and economic outlook of mobile phone owners who use their smartphone for all of its functions as compared to the general US Adult 18 and over population.

About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst

- See more at: http://www.iab.net/iablog/2014/04/GIF.html#sthash.jts7rfyl.dpuf

About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst

- See more at: http://www.iab.net/iablog/2014/04/GIF.html#sthash.jts7rfyl.dpuf
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About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst

- See more at: http://www.iab.net/iablog/2014/04/GIF.html#sthash.jts7rfyl.dpuf

About the Author

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Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, Games, Content Marketing and Native Advertising. 
She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst

- See more at: http://www.iab.net/iablog/2014/04/GIF.html#sthash.jts7rfyl.dpuf




 
The IAB is only as strong as its members. 

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Each month IAB selects a member company who has demonstrated both exceptional leader and learner roles due to their elevated participation in IAB activities. Member participation in our initiatives not only empowers committees & councils to create industry-wide accepted specifications, guidelines and best practices, but also gives member companies and individuals the opportunity to have their voice heard and receive visibility for their efforts. 

This month we spoke with BrightRoll, who has taken advantage of Town Hall speaking opportunities, Webinar attendance, 3MS Educational Forums, Quality Assurance Guideline Training, IAB.networking events, and much more.


What does your company do, and specifically how does it serve the digital ecosystem?
BrightRoll builds software that automates digital video advertising globally. The company enables advertisers, publishers and technology partners to grow their business through the industry’s leading programmatic video advertising platform. 

Brands, agencies, agency trading desks, demand side platforms and ad networks use our technology to reach precise audiences at scale, reduce waste, improve performance and simplify the complexity of video advertising across screens. 

On the publisher side of the business, BrightRoll enables more than 21,000 websites, mobile websites and apps to maximize their yield and efficiency, provide control over pricing and the advertisers appearing on their sites, and simplify the process to enable the delivery of advanced video advertising formats across multiple screens.

In addition, BrightRoll partners with a consortium of technology and data companies to bring advanced capabilities to the video ad ecosystem to help marketers improve the efficacy of their programmatic video advertising campaigns.

What initiatives is BrightRoll looking forward to working with the IAB and its member companies on; and how do you motivate your colleagues to get involved?
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Tim Avila, SVP of Marketing Operations, BrightRoll
BrightRoll is an active supporter of all IAB initiatives focused on establishing guidelines, standards and best practices for digital video advertising. We look forward to continuing leadership efforts around industry wide initiatives to combat ad fraud, including the IAB Trustworthy Digital Supply Chain and IAB Quality Assurance Guidelines. BrightRoll also looks forward to actively participating in multiple working groups including the research council and the digital video, 3MS and programmatic working groups.

The value the IAB brings, not only to our business and clients, but to the industry as a whole, is evident to employees across our organization. A number of BrightRoll colleagues are active participants in IAB efforts and have either contributed thought leadership at events or joined committees and councils to support important industry initiatives. We encourage our colleagues to attend IAB events and have hosted IAB leaders at BrightRoll events to promote the progress being made by the organization and its members. We value the various opportunities the IAB offers for our employees to become involved and we encourage other industry professionals to join us in moving the industry forward.

How have you leveraged a leadership role at IAB over the past year and what was your take-away from the experience?
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Sable Mi, Senior Director, Research Strategic Planning, BrightRoll
I have been a member of the IAB for nearly four years and it has continuously proven to be a rewarding experience. Being a digital research strategist, I am always looking for better ways to measure and prove ad effectiveness across media. Working closely with IAB provides me with the opportunity to collaborate with industry leaders and continuously improve the efficacy of digital advertising.
My most recent leadership role with the IAB was at the Cross-Screen Video Town Hall where I presented ‘TV & Mobile: The Complete Picture,’ which tells a compelling story of how TV and mobile video together improves reach and cost efficiency. In addition to the town hall presentation, I have been actively involved with the IAB Research Council and its Advisory Board, Emerging Innovation task force as well as Data, Mobile Video and the Ad Effectiveness working groups; all of them are playing crucial roles in moving the industry forward. 

There is never a dull moment in this rapidly evolving industry and I value the opportunity to be a part of the initiatives that are contributing to the growth of the industry. This progress wouldn’t be possible without the dedication of the IAB and its members who have collectively provided thought leadership and guidance in standardized measurement, data and inventory quality, cross-platform ad effectiveness, and more. It is incredibly valuable for leaders from across the digital ecosystem to come together to share their expertise in an actionable way and I am honored to be a part of it. 

How did you participate as a learner at IAB over the past year and what was your take-away from the experience?
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David Liu, Business Development Manager, BrightRoll
Being a member of the IAB has been an incredibly valuable experience and I appreciate the expert learning opportunities that it provides. I began my career as an Ad Operations Manager at BrightRoll and was excited to join IAB Ad Ops Council to learn the more about the operational efficiencies within interactive advertising. Even as I’ve transitioned into my new role as a Business Development Manager at BrightRoll, I continue to find that the IAB’s diverse services are immensely valuable. 

Most recently, I attended the IAB Internet Advertising Revenue Report Webinar to monitor the latest spending trends in digital advertising and to get a better sense of where the video is headed. It’s our goal to integrate leading companies into our BrightRoll Partner Program and this report serves as a valuable data point in identifying the right partners. Additionally, the business development team at BrightRoll both appreciates and leverages the advertising standards set forth by the IAB. Regardless of whether it has to do with viewability or VPAID, the IAB standards provide an indispensable baseline for our partner integration conversations.



About the Author

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Nicole Horsford

Nicole Horsford is the Member Services Director at IAB.


 
On October 23rd, thinkLA and IAB were thrilled to host a Programmatic Summit in Los Angeles, in association with eMarketer. Our first ever collaboration focused on the rising tide of programmatic within digital media. Over 500 brand marketers, media buyers, online publishers, ad networks, ad exchanges, and other solution providers came together to discuss and debate the next evolution of programmatic. 
 
Here are the top 10 takeaways from the event about programmatic:
  1. Programmatic is more than RTB. There is a lot of confusion over the term programmatic, which many people mistakenly believe is only real-time bidding (RTB) or used only for remnant inventory. Ultimately programmatic is the process of buying and selling media in an automated fashion. This includes four main types of transactions - open auctions, invitation-only/private auctions, unreserved fixed rate/preferred deals, and automated guaranteed/programmatic guaranteed deals. Every time someone says the word “programmatic” make sure you ask what exactly they mean. Watch this Digital Simplified video that explains how one part of programmatic, RTB, works step by step.
  2. Lots of challenges still exist to enable programmatic to work. Concerns that were addressed throughout the event included transparency, fraud, and trust; limited understanding and knowledge; confusion over terminology; moving from direct response to branding dollars, moving from mostly standard banners to native, video, rising stars, and audio ad formats; internal organizational challenges for brands and publishers; and delivering different creative through programmatic.
  3. Programmatic is big and getting bigger. The programmatic market (including auction, and direct deals) is expected to top $10B in 2014 and grow to $20B by 2016. For now, RTB remains the dominant part of programmatic spending (92% in 2014), but is expected to fall to under 60% of total programmatic spend by 2016 as programmatic direct increases. Within RTB, open auctions account for 88% of total RTB spend, though this is changing with private marketplaces growing significantly faster. While display is still dominant for now, mobile and video programmatic are growing fast.
  4. Fraud and trust are big issues, but are being tackled by the industry. Bots and fraud have become a big issue mainly due to the large sums of money involved. The IAB and the industry are building a trust stack to tackle fraud, malware, piracy, and transparency and include these in a joint cross-industry accountability program) building on the existing Quality Assurance Guidelines. Advertisers and buyers should make sure they know their supply sources, choose their vendors carefully, and always remember “If it’s too good to be true, it probably is!” Publishers need to ensure they are coordinating between sales, marketing, operations, and analytics to identify any strange traffic patterns and remember if they are doing audience extension they need to apply the same controls as buyers should.
  5. Publishers can hit a home run with programmatic video. The concern that programmatic has been perceived as a “race to the bottom” for rates and yield has not been the case in video due to restricted supply. Publishers can use programmatic to fund the creation of quality video content particularly by helping to monetize traffic spikes. Ultimately efficiency doesn’t have to mean lower CPMs; it can also mean more effective engagement.  
  6. Measurement matters even more in a programmatic world. Brand marketers are looking for transparency, inventory quality, and technology simplicity. Buyers should ensure they are reaching the right audience, use a consistent, comparable metric to plan, buy, and sell audiences, use brand data to ensure advertising resonates, and ultimately ensure that the campaign drives the desired action.
  7. Attribution is essential to effective programmatic spend. Last touch attribution is outdated and is like giving all the credit in a relay race to the last runner. Attribution models should incorporate the “first site visit” separating the funnel into prospecting and retargeting, and set the right incentives to each part.
  8. Brands in automotive are leveraging programmatic. Leading brands are looking beyond the simple retargeting of ads and embracing programmatic across the consumer path to purchase from unaware to loyal purchasers. The agency automation “stack” includes four layers - unified data platform, open access to media inventory, single metrics regime, and dynamic ad creation/production/serving platform. Brands are finally learning from programmatic media to employ new tactics in automated creative—not creating by machines, but optimizing ad variables based on real-time, impression level data.
  9. Publishers need to re-org to capture the value of programmatic. Publishers are adopting programmatic as a core part of their monetization strategy. However, this can pose internal challenges. The top five ways to build a successful programmatic publisher organization were the following: align incentives and compensation; educate direct sellers and have them attend Programmatic 101 training; programmatic team to focus on supporting direct sales (agencies) and covering programmatic buying entities (DSPs, trading desks, retargeters); establish a programmatic rate card; and have internal and external quarterly budget reviews.
  10. Creativity and programmatic are not enemies. Every ad should be dynamic and leverage the same audience signals used in programmatic media buying to make the creative relevant. This can be done by infusing first or third-party data on demographics, location, and previous website behavior to alter the headline call to action, image, or assets of the ad unit to ensure the message resonates with the user. Doing this can double yield on interaction rates and increase engagement by 50%. 


 

Historic Transatlantic Partnership for the Digital Ad Industry

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Today IAB US and IAB Europe join together to publish recommendations for promoting global trade and innovation as our respective governments negotiate a vital trade program. Titled “Modernizing Safe Harbor to Ensure Continued Growth in the Digital Economy”, we provide the industry’s first consensus policy position on data governance issues, and hope they can serve as guidance for ongoing negotiations between the US and Europe on the revision of the Safe Harbor framework.

The US and EU are among the world’s most vibrant digital advertising marketplaces, together representing $92 billion in annual revenue, or nearly 70% of the global industry, and maintaining equally significant market share in emerging categories such as mobile advertising.

The Safe Harbor framework has greatly contributed to the success of this marketplace by providing more than 4,000 businesses, including many IAB member companies, a means to transfer data across the Atlantic in a streamlined and cost-effective manner that ensures consumer protection.

As negotiators in the US and EU undertake the critically important task of reviewing the Safe Harbor framework, it is imperative that both sides seek to develop a more integrated transatlantic market for data flows to accelerate the growth of the digital economy. 

It is with this aim that IAB US and IAB Europe today announced principles for a modernized Safe Harbor framework to serve as guidance to US and EU negotiators on the digital advertising industry’s priorities. These principles call for a business environment that is conducive to innovation and economic growth, a balanced approach to economic growth and protection of personal data, increased legal certainty for companies, and coherence with US and EU laws. 

The principles also highlight the importance of US and EU trade negotiations that are currently underway as a means to furthering the success of the transatlantic digital economy for years to come.

IAB US and IAB Europe will continue to leverage the IAB Global Network to push for a workable framework that ensures the responsible flow of data between the world’s two largest digital marketplaces.

About the Authors

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Randall Rothenberg

Randall Rothenberg is President and Chief Executive Officer, IAB



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Townsend Feehan

Townsend Feehan is Chief Executive Officer, IAB Europe






 
The IAB is only as strong as its members. 

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Each month IAB selects a member company who has demonstrated both exceptional leader and learner roles due to their elevated participation in IAB activities. Member participation in our initiatives not only empowers committees & councils to create industry-wide accepted specifications, guidelines and best practices, but also gives member companies and individuals the opportunity to have their voice heard and receive visibility for their efforts. 

This month we spoke with Tremor Video, who has taken advantage of Town Hall speaking opportunities, Webinar attendance, Digital Content NewFronts, Quality Assurance Guidelines and much more. 


What does your company do, and specifically how does it serve the digital ecosystem?
At Tremor Video we’re transforming the video advertising experience across all screens for our clients. In a nutshell, we are a tech company that really understands brand advertising for video.

We’ve developed a technology platform, VideoHub®, which offers advertisers and publishers a complete programmatic solution to reach and engage consumers while providing new insights into what drives brand performance across screens.

We operate a complete digital ad tech stack for video, meaning we offer solutions for both advertisers and publishers, ranging from ad serving, to buying & selling inventory, to analytics.

The digital ecosystem has evolved to a point where a screen-specific approach is not the most effective way for marketers to reach their target audiences, so we’re helping them reach consumers in a screen-agnostic world.  


What initiatives is Tremor Video looking forward to working with the IAB and its member companies on; and how do you motivate your colleagues to get involved?
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Tim Ware, Head of Mobile/CTV Sales, Tremor Video
We work closely with the IAB to develop guidelines around a number of initiatives, including quality assurance, measurement and innovative new ad units.

As the head of mobile and CTV sales, I’m most looking forward to elevating the importance of mobile creative to showcase how effective mobile video advertising is as consumption continues to grow, particularly in tablets for 2015. I’m also looking forward to teaming with the IAB to work with affiliated industry groups like MRC as we develop Advanced TV measurement and best practices. Advanced TV combines the best of digital and TV advertising capabilities and we’re at an exciting time where over 83M US consumers are watching content on them.

Motivating my colleagues to get involved with the IAB isn’t hard because everyone fully understands the value and insights one can gain from participating. The IAB offers so many different options to get involved at any level and time commitment. Tremor Video holds seats on a number of committees and councils as well. 

 
How have you leveraged a leadership role at IAB over the past year and what was your take-away from the experience?
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Doron Wesly, Head of Market Strategy, Tremor Video
I love to tell stories, especially when I can weave in data nuggets to remind marketers that “consumers” are people just like them. We spend so much time looking at demographics and target audiences, but I like to be the person that gets everyone to take a step back see the big picture. 

Speaking at the IAB at events like the IAB NewFront Lunch, Future of the App Town Hall and upcoming IAB Mixx give me the opportunity to show people what I’ve learned from being on the road and talking to real consumers. 

Seeing the crowd nod their heads and scribble down notes reminds me how important market research is, and the IAB is a wonderful platform to share those learnings.
  
 

How did you participate as a learner at IAB over the past year and what was your take-away from the experience?
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Lisa Tanzosh, Sales Strategy, Buy-Side Platforms, Enterprise
I attended a number of events this past year, including “Using Data & Programmatic to Go Global and Build Brands” which focused on different perspectives and opinions from panelists working in all corners of the industry (agency, publishers, data, platform, etc.). The viewpoints discussed left me with three important takeaways:
    • Transparency is key, but as an industry we need to define - what does it mean to be truly transparent in the programmatic space? 
    • Now that programmatic technologies are in place, let’s find ways to implement more engaging and interactive creative in real time
    • Now that people are getting more comfortable with letting technology do the heavy lifting, we can begin to take advantage of programmatic efficiencies
As Tremor Video continues to improve its programmatic offering, it’s helpful to participate in IAB events that elevate the programmatic conversation and allow publishers, advertisers, and agencies to dig into important industry topics. 




About the Author

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Nicole Horsford

Nicole Horsford is the Member Services Director at IAB.



 

TV in the Digital Age

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Perhaps the thing I love most about the digital advertising industry is the continuous evolution and emergence of new trends and sectors to develop and discover. The latest area to pique the interest of IAB members, and also top agencies like Zenith and Maxus, is Connected Device Advertising. We’ve all cast our bet on this being one of the next needle movers and many are heavily investing. From an IAB perspective, we know what it takes to create an efficient, smooth value chain - and that’s a sound set of standards, forums for innovation, and industry-wide education. With our soon-to-be rolled out Advanced TV initiatives, covering the spectrum of digital TV platforms ranging from Connected TVs and game consoles to capable set-top-boxes, we’ll be starting work groups to create cross-screen video ad delivery standards iterated from IAB Digital Video-Suite, address the convergence of measurement and metrics for TV and Digital Video, discuss standards for OEMs, the role of data and targeting in AdvancedTV, and much, much more.

As a kickoff to greater focus in this arena, IAB held a Town Hall in May, sponsored by member, Delivery Agent, titled “TV in the Digital Age: How Big Brands are Harnessing the Power of Connected Devices.” The program was packed with stellar contributors to the evolution of the TV space, ranging from buy side to sell side to the tech sector. We brought in one of the few analysts who covers and knows this space inside and out, Heather Way of Parks Associates. Heather grounded us on what is included in the the Connected Device footprint and gave insights on projected marketplace distribution growth.

A panel of buying and technology experts gave us perspective on the unique value of the products residing on connected device platforms that play well together like targeting capabilities and on-screen conversion features. A case study was covered which used first screen embedded ACR technology in Samsung Smart TVs to deliver a T-commerce experience during the Super Bowl. How long have we been talking about buying Jennifer Aniston’s sweater from TV? The item for purchase in this campaign was not her sweater, rather, it was David Beckham’s underwear, sold by H&M. This campaign is proof that if we dream it we can achieve it. It’s those notions and thoughts, like Jennifer’s sweater, that give the industry an idea to rally around and in-part fuel the innovation of companies like Delivery Agent and Samsung to innovate.

I’d like to extend an invitation to you and your company to get involved in IAB’s Advanced TV efforts as they begin to emerge. It’s in the Digital Video Committee and AdvancedTV Work Groups that we will conceive the notions that lead to the next best thing in TV. If you are interested in participating, please email [email protected] for more info. 

As I close, I’d like to leave you with a highlight reel and full coverage of Delivery Agent’s TV in the Digital Age Town Hall. As you review, buyers, think of ways you can include functionality like this in campaign proposals and technologists, think of ways you can build off of the IP feature set to build new experiences for the viewer and client. Let’s all bring our ideas to the table and make some serious strides toward addressable, cross-screen video experiences. 



About the Author

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Julie Van Ullen

Julie Van Ullen is the Vice President of Member Services at the Interactive Advertising Bureau. Julie oversees a number of IAB’s elite Committees and Councils, charged with putting industry best practices and thought leadership into the marketplace. Those focal areas include Native, Programmatic, Digital Video, Advanced TV, Digital Audio, Social Media, Games and more.

 

 
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The IAB is only as strong as its members. 

We’re delighted to congratulate Time Inc. for being the inaugural member of the month. Time Inc. was selected because they have taken full advantage of learning to leading opportunities, ranging from leading conversations on the Programmatic Council to attending educational  IAB webinars. 

Below, we interviewed those leaders and learners to hear their perspective on what is going on in digital advertising and their experience with the IAB.  

What does your company do, and specifically how does it serve the digital ecosystem?
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Dan Realson, VP Digital Sales, Time Inc. 
Time Inc. is first and foremost a storyteller. From desktop to mobile, from video to social, our diverse portfolio of brands engages 83 million passionate, loyal consumers on a monthly basis in a dialogue that entertains, informs, inspires and enriches their lives. The connections we have with our consumers are a powerful draw for our ad partners. Our scale and breadth of brands give us diverse audiences, deep insights and rich data - both offline and online - allowing us to create custom solutions that are highly targeted and contextually relevant, driving more efficiency and effectiveness for advertisers. It’s that intersection of content, context, data and scale that fuels our innovative suite of digital solutions.

Whether working directly with one of our brands, or buying programmatically across the Time Inc. digital network our advertisers benefit from the value audiences place on our quality, branded content.

What initiatives is Time Inc. looking forward to working with the IAB and its member companies on; and how do you motivate your colleagues to get involved?
Dan Realson, VP Digital Sales, Time Inc. 
Time Inc. will continue to work with the IAB on initiatives to advance industry education on programmatic as well as other initiatives such as transparency, viewability and building a trustworthy supply chain. We are also eager to work with the IAB on establishing industry-wide standards for tablet, campaign measurement, and audience measurement for video, as well as the development of responsive, multi-platform ad units.

The key to motivation is in claiming Time Inc.’s leadership position in the media community, recognizing the IAB as an arbiter and megaphone for best practices, and underscoring our opportunity to have a voice in shaping the issues that are driving our industry today.
 
How have you leveraged thought leadership development at IAB over the past year and what was your take-away from the experience?
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Patrick Landi, Executive Director Programmatic Sales, Time Inc.
I have been an active member of the Programmatic Council for publishers since last summer where I have participated in a number of initiatives to help create best practices around programmatic selling. Projects have ranged from creating guidelines for building out a programmatic sales team to developing content for a programmatic 101 webinar in which I participated as a speaker. I also helped curate content for the IAB’s recent professional development class entitled Advanced Programmatic for Direct Sellers, and I will be serving on the Digital Media Sales Certification (DMSC) exam committee later this year. Participating in this group and getting to know my peers on the council  has been an invaluable resource that I have used to help develop Time Inc.’s own programmatic sales team and strategy. I’ve also incorporated the materials from the IAB webinars into my own programmatic training sessions across Time Inc. and continue to use the IAB as a resource as our programmatic organization continues to develop.  
 
How did you participate as a learner at IAB over the past year and what was your take-away from the experience?
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Nicole Waddell, Digital Client Services Manager, Time Inc.
We are well trained on Time Inc.’s ad solutions but we rarely get to take a deeper look into what the industry as a whole is doing, especially as it relates to our colleagues at other companies. The IAB Programmatic Webinar (specific for publishers) was a unique opportunity that allowed me to see how other media companies are looking at Programmatic, what approaches their organizations are taking, how they are adapting their business strategies, and how they deal with challenges that may arise. I was encouraged to learn from an outside perspective, that even as the industry continues to adapt and grow, Time Inc. is taking a unique approach and has a strong offering in the marketplace.



To find out more about Time Inc.’s digital advertising opportunities go to www.Timeinc.com



About the Author

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Nicole Horsford

Nicole Horsford is the Member Services Director at IAB.




 

Media Multitaskers and Purchase Influence

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Consumers are increasingly pressed for time and, due to the multitude of readily available media sources, undivided attention.  Thus, it should come as no surprise that consumers are frequently multitasking, particularly with other media.  82% of American adults (over 18) go online while watching TV and 43% of them make this a regular habit.  So, as sellers of media, the question arises:  Are these Media Multitaskers even noticing the advertising?  And where does digital fall in this picture?  New research from the IAB shows that they are indeed noticing the ads on both media and they’re even being influenced by them, especially digital.  

As media multitasking grows, it becomes increasingly important for media buyers and sellers to understand the place of media in this new environment and how to best reach consumers.  The IAB analyzed Prosper Insights data to examine the media behaviors and influence of habitual Media Multitaskers and the results are impressive

Media Multitaskers are more likely than the general population to notice TV commercials and digital ads and are more likely to have their purchases influenced by the media and ads that they’re taking in on either screen.  They’re 6 percentage points (ppt) more likely than the general public to report regularly watching TV commercials.  Media Multitaskers are 5 percentage points more likely to report that both Broadcast TV and Internet Advertising influence their Electronics purchases.  Fascinatingly, Internet Advertising and Email Advertising have a higher purchase influence on Media Multitaskers than Cable TV does.  For instance, 29% of Media Multitaskers state that Internet Ads and Email Ads influence their Electronics purchases while only 23% report that Cable TV influences those purchases.  Similar differences in ad influence are seen across product verticals.   

Who are these Media Multitaskers?  Media Multitaskers are more likely to be young, single, females of average income who are heavy media users, especially of digital media.  Within digital, they’re also heavier Video Streamers and users of Mobile and Social Media—all of which are more likely to influence their purchases.  In an average week (M-SU), they’re 10 percentage points more likely than the general population to surf the internet, where they are 14 ppt more likely to use social media and 8 ppt more likely to stream online radio.  Media Multitaskers are also 9 ppt more likely to regularly watch digital video either online or on a mobile device.  They’re more likely to own and use any mobile device.  Media Multitaskers are most active online during primetime TV viewing hours (8-11pm).  

Evidence points to Media Multitaskers integrating media together across screens.  For example, Media Multitaskers are more inclined to do an online search related to something they’ve seen on TV or in a digital ad.  About one-quarter to one-third report searching online as a result of what they’ve seen in an internet or email ad or on TV.  While searching, they’re more prone to be influenced by a sponsored search result - nearly half report doing so.  

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Compounding the impact of search, Media Multitaskers are more likely to regularly do online product research before buying and their #1 online activity for fun is shopping. Additionally, Media Multitaskers happen to be planning major purchases within the next 6 months, more so than the general population.  These major purchases include vacation travel, computers, furniture and autos.

But it’s not just about search.  Media Multitaskers integrate various media types and are influenced by all digital media ad formats.  29% of Media Multitaskers report that their Electronics purchases are influenced by Internet Advertising and Email Advertising (5 ppt and ppt more than the general population).  Media Multitaskers are much more likely to use any social media service and 21% are influenced by social media in their Electronics purchases.  65% stream video online and 59% report watching the video ads (5 ppt more than the general population).  20% report that their mobile device influences their Electronics purchases (+4 ppt). Digital media ad influence extends beyond Electronics purchases, as detailed in the report.

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All of this points to digital advertising as the place to reach the time-constrained, multitasking consumer.  Digital should be part of any integrated TV campaign, since digital is increasingly where TV viewers are taking action.  Those who are simultaneously surfing and watching are in fact reacting to what they’re seeing on each screen and the computer seems to be the screen in which they take their actions further.  They’re most likely to be simultaneously watching TV and online during primetime TV hours, so this is the place to hit them with an integrated campaign, which they can search about online, where they should encounter a related digital ad. 

Retailers too should consider digital as a component to their TV buys since Media Multitaskers are more likely to research online before buying and more likely to do their shopping online.  Media Multitaskers’ major purchase plans combined with the purchase influence of digital advertising formats create ideal conditions for digital advertising to them. 

Perhaps the most important reason to target this group is that since multitasking behavior is growing at a fast pace, today’s Media Multitaskers will soon become tomorrow’s typical consumers.  By embracing the new way consumers watch TV - which includes an online accompaniment - advertisers can meet consumers on their terms by offering an integrated brand experience across screens, thereby deepening their relationship with the consumer.


About the Author

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Kristina Sruoginis

Kristina Sruoginis is the Research Director at IAB.


 
Although Integral has been on the forefront of the fight against impression fraud in the digital advertising industry, I have been largely silent on the topic.  Despite that I’m a battle-scarred ad tech vet with strong opinions, I have been quiet because I know that many will perceive my words as biased due to Integral’s role in fraud prevention.  Two recent incidents, however, prompted me to end my silence.  Some will be surprised by my conclusions.

For the record, my definition of impression fraud - as recognized by the IAB - is a situation where an advertiser buys a digital ad that has zero chance of being seen by a human.  Fraud comes in many flavors, including ad stacking, whole websites stuffed into non-viewable i-frames, and botnets of infected consumers’ computers, which surreptitiously mimic humans’ surfing behavior.  Although all cause harm to the advertising ecosystem, I will be referring mainly to bot traffic here as we believe it’s the most common form of fraud and probably the hardest to detect.

The first aforementioned incident that caused me to speak out was a call I received from an old colleague who runs a media company that produces valuable fitness-related content.  He called me in panic because he was told by one of his big clients that they were discontinuing advertising with his company.  Their reason was that a technology vendor had found that 100 percent of his site’s impressions were fraudulent.  Given what I knew of the site, 100 percent fraudulent traffic sounded improbable.  I quickly offered to help by running a test on his site.  The results showed that my former colleague’s site did have some fraud, but the levels were closer to 20 percent.  It became quite clear that the technology vendor measuring fraud was labeling a lot of legitimate inventory (in this case 80 percent) as bad inventory.  I thought that this may have been an isolated case, but with further investigation, I found that this was happening to a lot of other publishers as well.  Sites that had even a modicum of fraud were being labeled as fraudulent by this well-known vendor.  

This issue seemed like a micro-level problem to me.  Human traffic was being incorrectly categorized as bot traffic on domains with any level of fraud, and while unfortunate, only impacted those sites affected.  The second incident, a call from an investment bank research analyst, made me realize that there is a macro-issue at play as well.  This bank was putting the final touches on its special report on the state of digital media and wanted me to verify that the annual loss from impression fraud in the online display ad industry was over $20 billion.  Say what?  I have read some pretty aggressive predictions around the dollars lost to fraud, but $20 billion?  That estimate is way too high. 

So, I feel I need to come forward and take a stand.  Fraud is a problem in the online advertising industry, but NOT a problem of this magnitude.  Whether on purpose or not, the fraud problem is being exaggerated.  We have a problem, but it’s been blown out of proportion and it’s not as big as what we read.  There, I said it.  A year ago, I was concerned because I felt that the industry was not talking enough about the fraud problem, and now, I am worried about the opposite.  If we’re not careful, we are going to get carried away and cause irreparable harm to the future of digital advertising.

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So how did we get here exactly?  I put the blame into a couple of categories.  The first category has to do with limitations in technology.  The unnamed vendor labeling my former colleague’s website as having 100 percent fraudulent traffic is a good example of technological limitations.  In this case, the vendor correctly detected some fraudulent activity, but extrapolated this information to the domain or site level.  In other words, bot-related fraud happens at a user level (an infected computer), but due to technical restrictions, it is often tied to a domain level (e.g., fitness-related-site.com).  To make matters worse, many solutions only have two classifications of the entire site: fraudulent or clean.  Thus, if the solution sees any reasonable fraction of fraudulent impressions on a website, it has to make a decision to label the site as fraudulent or clean.  The threshold for fraud is typically set quite low in order to eliminate as much bot traffic as possible.  The end result is that a relatively few fraudulent visitors can cause a vendor to mislabel a large percentage of normal impressions fraudulent.  And as most fraud appears on legitimate sites that are buying traffic (a portion of which turns out to be non-human), as opposed to whole fake sites with 100% fraudulent traffic, this mis-labeling is very common.  When you start to aggregate these mis-labeled statistics and extrapolate on what it means industry-wide on a percentage of total impressions, the amount of fraud present looks downright scary.  Then, if you apply industry average CPMs to these extrapolated estimates (despite the fact that fraudulent inventory is usually cheaper than average), suddenly $20 billion appears plausible. 

So, what’s the alternative to rolling up fraud statistics and detecting at the domain level?  The better option is to intercept the ad call as soon as you detect a fraudulent user and thus only block the one ad from serving to this specific bot.  However, you need to do this detection at the ad impression level.  It’s the equivalent of using a laser to perform surgery rather than a butcher knife.   Here are a couple of things to look out for:  If more than 15 percent of your campaign impressions overall are identified as fraudulent and blocked, there is a good chance fraud detection is at the domain level.  This means you are using a butcher knife, and this will likely cause friction with partners and needlessly hurt your scale.

Additionally, if you ever hear that blocking is not possible or bad because it tips off the fraudsters, you should know that you have been given false information.  If done correctly, there is absolutely NO truth to this claim.  It’s an urban myth - similar to one that claims freezing water in plastic bottles release dangerous dioxins - so don’t fall for it!  Even if fraudsters were able to somehow detect that a specific bot did not receive the originally intended ad each time (not likely), there is no data that would give them the ability to reverse engineer the reasons why.  People claiming that blocking is bad because it helps the bad guys are either naïve, rely on only one method for detecting fraud (like side channel analysis) or are purposely deceitful.  In any case, it means that they’re suggesting a solution that does not have the technological sophistication to block at the impression level, and thus not as effective in preventing fraud and saving money for advertisers.

The second category of blame for exaggerating the fraud problem is related more to commercial reasons.  The fraud problem has created lots of opportunity and companies have popped up almost overnight to capitalize on it.  Many of the companies are made up of people who have never bought or sold an ad and have no appreciation for the media or the technology behind it.  They see dollar signs and exaggerate the problem to give their company attention and help them create more demand for their product and services.  Furthermore, most of these companies see only a small percentage of the online population - typically the worst stuff.  They make the assumption that their tiny sample of media is representative of the entire industry’s media and use these biased samples to wildly extrapolate.  Needless to say, the industry’s long-term health is not their top concern.  

So, where do we go from here?  Well, first it starts with a little perspective.  We have a fraud problem.  It has been exaggerated, however, and it’s not as big as many of the pundits say.  It definitely won’t ruin the industry - we won’t allow it to — and it’s not out of control.  That’s the good news.  The bad news is fraud is still a problem nonetheless.  It’s not only a sell side problem nor is it only a buy side problem.  It’s an industry problem.  And this problem will not go away anytime soon and may never completely vanish.  The bad guys are made up of amateurs and very sophisticated professionals.  We can eliminate the amateurs, but the pros are making a lot of money in fraud and they will continue to invest heavily in building better deceptions.  Our goal has to be to work together as an industry to shut down all amateur activity and get the professional levels to a very small, manageable amount.  The good news is that we are making progress.  Despite what you may hear, fraud levels have dropped over the past year.  We are at the beginning of the battle, but we’ve got the bad guys on the run. 


About the Author


Scott_headshot_hi-res.jpgScott Knoll

Scott Knoll is the CEO of Integral Ad Science



 

Make Mobile Work continues with Design with Device in Mind

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On Tuesday, May 13th IAB’s Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence hosted our second Make Mobile Work webinar of the four-part series. Devoted to cross-screen creative and “Designing with Device in Mind” we had a great discussion with insights from Xaxis, Doubleclick and Tremor Video. View the full webinar, download the slides and sign up for future webinars here.

As we continue our call to help marketers navigate mobile and cross-screen opportunities - we’ve invited Time, Inc. to share some additional studies of brands successfully connecting with their always-on, device-agnostic, digital consumers. Additionally, be sure to check out the Mobile Center’s new launched creative and case study showcases page where you can see examples of HTML5 mobile and tablet creative as well as cross-screen case studies from our members.

The Driven Campaign 
A Time Inc. Digital Experience 
Coming from a publisher’s point of view there are several important factors when addressing cross-screen capabilities for our sites and ad campaigns.  With upwards of 50% of our digital audience visiting us from mobile devices, and growing, it makes cross-screen strategies an imperative from both the user experience and business operations point of view. Today Time Inc. has 21 Tablet Magazines, 25 Mobile & Tablet Apps, and 19 Mobile Websites  ̶  many of which are going through responsive design reboots. 

For this post I’m going to focus on a specific campaign we created for Land Rover that was powered by our Watercooler LIVE content marketing platform. The platform comprises several unique products and capabilities that come together like Voltron to help marketers win the battle for attention and engage with audiences across devices.  

In the demos below you can see the Land Rover - “Driven” campaign as it renders for users across multiple environments. Time Inc. curated the “Driven” campaign content from paid, owned, and earned media channels into a responsive site that was iFramed into landroverusa.com/driven. We also put a re-direct on that domain pointing to a standalone site for users coming from mobile devices in order to ensure an ideal user experience for every device.  

This is how visits were divided by screen:
  • 66% Desktop
  • 12% Tablet
  • 20% Smart Phone
The HTML5 responsive site worked seamlessly across screens and was also engineered to provide dynamic content to its accompanying Time Amplify ad units. All of our products are designed to increase both reach and engagement by allowing advertisers to take context (Time Inc. content) to go.  Through our data assets and platform connections, we were able to run these units both on and off of the Time Inc. network, finding our audience at the right place, at the right time, and on the right device. As part of this campaign, we also created a custom unit to roadblock sponsored editorial content and provide users with another opportunity to engage with the “Driven” campaign as a 100% opt-in experience. The video below showcases the Time Amplify units that dynamically pair Sports Illustrated content to the “Driven” campaign elements. 
Using MOAT analytics to measure in-view and interaction across all screens, we delivered the equivalent of over 10 years of measured in-view time across desktop, mobile and tablet in a two-month period. As you can see, the “Driven” campaign really benefited from us taking device into consideration from the outset. The campaign garnered an average engagement rate north of 7% and Average Time Spent across all elements of the campaign of nearly a minute. Great results across the board.

Here are a few tips for marketers wondering where to get started for a winning cross-screen strategy of their own. Developing for cross-screen has never been easier:
  • Start with the basics - Campaign objectives, creative brief, brand guidelines
  • Tailor your objectives to fit each screen—While you can leverage desktop assets across screens you should be mindful of screen size, bandwidth, and device-specific user behavior
  • Leverage platforms and tools to develop/experiment in faster cycles
  • Chart your users’ journey and create meaningful touch points using the screen and technology that’s most appropriate
  • Measure the metrics that matter for each screen and look at campaign results both holistically and in detail A/B test, measure, analyze, improve, and repeat
  • Always identify what could be done better and incorporate that learning into the next campaign

At Time Inc., we strive to leverage large, impactful, flexible, and standardized canvases — including the IAB rising stars — by painting them with dynamic, content-driven ad experiences that feel authentic to consumers and drive engagement and results for marketers. Make sure your partners are equally committed to approaching cross-screen in a way that resonates with your customers. 


About the Authors


headshot.jpgBelinda J. Smith

Belinda J. Smith is Senior Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the Interactive Advertising Bureau



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Sam Mansour

Sam Mansour is Director of Digital Ad Product Experience at Time Inc


 

Digital Video In-Stream Metrics Released!

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If you are familiar with the story of the Tower of Babel, you’re aware of the potential power behind a commonly understood language. When everyone accepts definitions in the same way, the chance of confusion is eliminated and time can be spent more efficiently in progressing forward rather than having to consistently translate various interpretations. Digital Video In-Stream Metrics serve this exact purpose for buyers and sellers of digital video in-stream advertising, and have played an important role in maturing the industry and supporting its evolution. 

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Digital video is a fast moving marketing channel undergoing a large amount of innovation and technical functionality, so the industry will need to periodically review and revise standards to reflect the needs of current practice. The last update to the metrics was in 2008, so IAB convened a working group to modernize the metrics but we found during comment periods that there were some prevailing questions that we chose to address outside of the document. 

We hosted the webinar, Digital Video Metrics Modernized to provide an overview of the document and addressed those questions, and as an added layer of clarity we have outlined them in an FAQ. Ultimately, our goal is to enable growth in the industry. We do this by building and maintaining consensus around the use of these metrics and concepts so that buyers understand sellers and transparency is established.


FAQ Digital Video In-Stream Metric Definitions 

Why not combine the metric definitions with the Impression Measurement Guidelines?

IAB Impression Measurement Guidelines, which have been developed for display, mobile and digital video, describe technical details for how an ad impression should be counted in each of the specified contexts. Each of the Impression Measurement Guidelines documents is used in the industry to establish sound measurement practices for ad impressions. 

In contrast, the Digital Video In-Stream Metric Definition document, simply describe a baseline of interactive metrics that companies can voluntarily track in digital video. No technical guidelines are imposed for how each metric is measured, allowing companies make the best use of their technology while offering the Industry a common definition for select interactive digital video metrics.

Why isn’t viewability covered in the update to metric definitions for digital in-stream video?

Viewability in digital video is a more complex issue than simply defining a term. The 2014 Digital In-Stream Video Metric Definitions only defines a baseline set of interactive metrics that the industry can use as a common lexicon. However, establishing common measurement practices for determining whether an ad is in view requires a process that identifies and addresses technical and operational challenges. The Make Measurements Make Sense (3MS) initiative is leading the efforts toward more effective impression measurements. As a standard becomes adopted in the industry, these metric definitions may be updated to reflect relevant changes.

We serve video ads into 300x250 placements on websites. Why is this being excluded from the definition for digital video in-stream video ads?

The format of an ad does not make it a digital video in-stream video ad; the context into which the ad is served defines digital in-stream video ads. The technology for receiving and executing ads is different and requires different resources when the ad is served into a webpage and when served into a video player. Video ads that are served into a webpage are commonly known as in-banner video ads and are executed by the browser. Separately, ads served into a player are received and executed by the player—each of which may be built using proprietary code. Therefore, only ads served to a player (video or otherwise), constitute a digital in-stream video ad.

What constitutes a “player?”

In the context of digital in-stream video, a player is a browser-based computer program that executes videos, animation, or games that streams publisher content.

One advertising strategy we use is to stream short clips of content along with ads into a display placement on a publisher’s webpage. Our ads are played before, during, or after the content we serve, and they’re served into a player. Are our ads considered digital in-stream video ads?

If the content being streamed belongs to the same publisher that also owns the webpage content into which you are serving the clips and ads, then yes. For example, a news publisher may post several short news clips in the sidebar of their page. Ads served into these news clips are considered digital in-stream video ads.

However, if the content belongs to publishers other than the one who owns the page content, and especially if that content is served to a display ad placement on the page, the content is a form of advertising. In this case, the content, as well as the ads served with it, are being served to the webpage and classified as in-page, or in-banner video ads.

Is mobile covered in this metric definition update?

Ads served into browser-based players that stream publisher content are considered digital in-stream ads, regardless of the device in which they play. However, mobile devices present some challenges to tracking ad interactions. Native players in mobile devices are capable of playing content while offline and therefore lack the persistent connection required for communicating ad interactions in real time. For now, the 2014 Digital In-Stream Video Metric Definitions are restricted to the context of live streaming content. However, to the extent possible, these metric definitions may be applied to native digital players in mobile.

Are the ads we serve into games considered digital in-stream video ads?

Yes, game publishers may sell ad inventory that is served into their browser-based game players. Ads served into these players are considered digital in-stream video ads.


About the Author
Jessica Anderson
Jessica Anderson is Senior Manager of Advertising Technology at IAB. 





 
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In this, the final installment of the IABlog series, “IAB Asks NewFront Sellers,” NewFront founders and presenters share what excites them the most with regard to digital video content, advertising, and the NewFronts.  Here’s what they had to say:

Ben Dietz, VP Sales & Business Development, VICE Media 

We’re excited about the IAB Rising Stars, in terms of their ability to incorporate video into certain units. We think longer-form video is going to continue to be a mode that people adopt. A quarter of all videos on YouTube right now are 20 minutes or longer. So there’s a huge appetite and a huge shift in the desire to consume longer pieces of content. Ads can probably get longer and less “selly” as a result. 

Jack Bamberger, Head of Agency and Industry Relations, AOL

People should attend AOL’s NewFront on April 29th and they’ll find out. We’ve got some surprises ad exciting announcements that we’ll be unveiling at the NewFront separate from our slate. Last year we were very bold in measurement, very bold in original content, and there’s no reason to expect anything but a continuation of AOL investing more in video. A great example is our acquisition from September of last year Adap.TV and what does that mean to the industry in terms of programmatic video. 

Jonathan Perelman, GM of Video & VP Agency Strategy, BuzzFeed 

It’s about highlighting ways that brands can do really compelling, sharable, video content. That to me is not pre-roll or TrueView ads, but it’s actually custom, bespoke, branded videos that tap into learnings and understandings about what makes video successful and doing that with brands. That’s what I’m really excited about and what we at BuzzFeed have been doing and are really excited to do a lot more of. NewFronts_LogoLock5.jpg

Peter Naylor, SVP Advertising, Hulu

As content consumption continues to be a multi-screen experience, we will see more ad formats with the ability to run across different platforms. On Hulu, we see over 3,000 multi-platform combinations used to watch Hulu Plus each month. For example, I watch Hulu Plus on an iPhone, iPad and my PC. I find that stat to be highly illustrative of the direction consumers are headed. And we can’t just follow where consumers are going, we have to always lead and be one step ahead. So, the ability to run ads across different platforms is a big trend. Another big trend - geo targeting, and ads that are targeted to local viewers.

The Hulu Upfront will take place April 30th in New York, and we’re excited to talk about how we are staying ahead of industry trends and innovating in the space on behalf of our advertising partners, content partners and users. I don’t want to give away too much (you’ll have to wait for the upfront!) but we’ll be sharing some new ways we can help advertisers reach their target audience through innovative new formats, alongside great new programming on our platform.

Jason Krebs, Head of Sales, and Erin McPherson, Chief Content Officer, Maker Studios

Krebs: Everything we’ve touched on [for this Q&A] are trends, because they’re very early. Either it’s Erin fielding different calls from new creators in Hollywood, traditional again, who’ve never done anything online. We have advertisers also asking us about potential new ways that we can take our creators and get them involved in their story. How are things happening socially? Are people sharing these? What are the view times? What are their browsing habits? Are they stumbling upon content? Are they tuning in? We have the whole subscription notion of YouYube. Many of the biggest subscribed channels in YouTube across the earth are Maker creators, and what does that mean? What’s a publishing cycle look? How often should we be producing this content? Where are people coming from when they’ve come to that content? Where do they go after? All of these things. We haven’t said the word data yet, so now I’m saying the word data. All those points are completely brand new. The trend of using all of that so everyone is better at what they do, advertisers and creators and consumers, it’s all early on and very exciting. 

McPherson: For a while now native has been a buzzword. People use that word loosely and broadly. We certainly use it when we’re talking about advertising that is truly organic to the consumer. Native content can be a creative idea that we work on with a brand. Native can also encompass a kind of ad that we’re in the early days of seeing in video. I’ll call it a smart ad, a targeted ad, an ad that understands what consumers’ behavior and interests are. We’re in the early days with video in personalization, really being able to customize not just your video content, but your video ad experience.

About the 2014 Digital Content NewFronts
Each year, thousands of people attend the Digital Content NewFronts to witness great new original video content, learn marketing best practices, and hear headline-grabbing announcements about partnerships that will change the course of the digital medium. This powerful series of presentations proves that digital video is the right place for brands to engage with consumers because consumers are engaging with digital video. Presenters include AOL, DigitasLBi, Google/YouTube, Hulu, Microsoft, Yahoo, and more. Learn More & See Schedule

IAB Cross-Screen Marketplace, Spotlight: Video, May 15, 2014
If you’re interested in digital video, IAB is bringing together thought leaders from both brands and agencies for the IAB Cross-Screen Marketplace. We’ll reveal how the buy and sell side are partnering to develop, deploy, and evaluate the success of multi-screen/multi-channel content and brand experiences, and the increasingly powerful role video is playing in this revolution. Learn More & See Agenda


 

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In this installment of the IABlog series, NewFront founders and presenters reveal how they see the relationship between emerging video consumption devices and good, old TV. We asked them: 

There’s a theory that mobile video and connected TV will start taking big chunks of consumer and advertising time out of basic cable fare. Is this happening? If not, why not?

Jonathan Perelman, GM of Video & VP Agency Strategy, BuzzFeed

Over half of our views are coming on mobile. I wrote something recently that said, for the last 7-10 years, people have been wondering if it’s the year of mobile. The reality is every year is the year of mobile ever since then. I was on the subway this morning and someone was watching a full-on movie on their phone. That 5 years ago was not something anyone would ever consider. Mobile is only going to grow and become more and more important to consumers and thus to advertisers. 

IAB: Do you think mobile is competing with TV at all audience time or advertising budget? 

Perelman: No, but we do see a lot of BuzzFeed video being watched during primetime, which that means someone is presumably sitting on their sofa maybe watching something else while on a social network. Someone passes along a video to them, and they’re going to click and play it while they’re watching something else. So I think, there’s maybe a burgeoning competition, but in terms of numbers and dollars it’s not so much a completion. 

Peter Naylor, SVP Advertising, Hulu

Everyone is limited to just 24 hours a day. That’s a constant. The variable is how people choose to spend their time, of course. There’s been a trend for many years that points to the rise of time spent with media and the rise of multi-tasking. So the media pie is getting bigger, but the slices of the pie are getting thinner. People now have the ability to time shift, device shift and place shift their media, and they are taking full advantage of all screens. We are essentially competing for mindshare and time share -quality content coupled with a best-in-class user experience is the key to being an essential part of a consumers daily entertainment choices.NewFronts_LogoLock4.jpg

Erin McPherson, Chief Content Officer, and Jason Krebs, Head of Sales, Maker Studios

McPherson: A lot of folks from the TV industry side say, “TV’s never been healthier,” which in many ways is true. The data I’ve looked at most recently showed consumption rising on traditional television platforms, as well as on digital. The secret here lies in—I won’t even call it second screen because second screen has come to mean a screen that interplays with your first screen—I’ll call it multiscreen. They are watching YouTube videos while they have the game on. Or they’re watching video in their Facebook or Twitter feeds, while they’ve have a reality show on. So the television is on but are people watching?  How are they watching and how are they engaging? At Maker, consumers don’t just view, they engage. 

Krebs: It’s the classic lean back and lean forward. We have a lot of lean forward, people interacting with the content, with the comments, with the sharing, as well as interacting with the ads themselves. We have a pretty vibrant business in ad creative that is purely interactive, where people can dive in more. 

Ben Dietz, VP Sales & Business Development, VICE Media

It’s not like we study the Nielsen ratings and go “ABC morning news is down 20%.” It’s more anecdotal, what we hear from our millennial audience. They’re consuming more on mobile. They’re consuming more online. They’re consuming more in a time-shifted fashion, and then beyond that they’re looking deeper into content that falls outside of mainstream broadcasts. We hear loud and clear from our audience that they’re shifting away, and that we believe very firmly that with audience will come dollars. It’s not happening as quickly as we’d like and there are inequities in the marketplace such as the rate that we can get for mobile, which needs to come to parity quickly. But we see it happening, and it will happen more in the future.

About the 2014 Digital Content NewFronts
Each year, thousands of people attend the Digital Content NewFronts to witness great new original video content, learn marketing best practices, and hear headline-grabbing announcements about partnerships that will change the course of the digital medium. This powerful series of presentations proves that digital video is the right place for brands to engage with consumers because consumers are engaging with digital video. Presenters include AOL, DigitasLBi, Google/YouTube, Hulu, Microsoft, Yahoo, and more. Learn More & See Schedule

IAB Cross-Screen Marketplace, Spotlight: Video, May 15, 2014
If you’re interested in digital video, IAB is bringing together thought leaders from both brands and agencies for the IAB Cross-Screen Marketplace. We’ll reveal how the buy and sell side are partnering to develop, deploy, and evaluate the success of multi-screen/multi-channel content and brand experiences, and the increasingly powerful role video is playing in this revolution. Learn More & See Agenda

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