Results tagged “digital ads” from IABlog

Historic Transatlantic Partnership for the Digital Ad Industry

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Today IAB US and IAB Europe join together to publish recommendations for promoting global trade and innovation as our respective governments negotiate a vital trade program. Titled “Modernizing Safe Harbor to Ensure Continued Growth in the Digital Economy”, we provide the industry’s first consensus policy position on data governance issues, and hope they can serve as guidance for ongoing negotiations between the US and Europe on the revision of the Safe Harbor framework.

The US and EU are among the world’s most vibrant digital advertising marketplaces, together representing $92 billion in annual revenue, or nearly 70% of the global industry, and maintaining equally significant market share in emerging categories such as mobile advertising.

The Safe Harbor framework has greatly contributed to the success of this marketplace by providing more than 4,000 businesses, including many IAB member companies, a means to transfer data across the Atlantic in a streamlined and cost-effective manner that ensures consumer protection.

As negotiators in the US and EU undertake the critically important task of reviewing the Safe Harbor framework, it is imperative that both sides seek to develop a more integrated transatlantic market for data flows to accelerate the growth of the digital economy. 

It is with this aim that IAB US and IAB Europe today announced principles for a modernized Safe Harbor framework to serve as guidance to US and EU negotiators on the digital advertising industry’s priorities. These principles call for a business environment that is conducive to innovation and economic growth, a balanced approach to economic growth and protection of personal data, increased legal certainty for companies, and coherence with US and EU laws. 

The principles also highlight the importance of US and EU trade negotiations that are currently underway as a means to furthering the success of the transatlantic digital economy for years to come.

IAB US and IAB Europe will continue to leverage the IAB Global Network to push for a workable framework that ensures the responsible flow of data between the world’s two largest digital marketplaces.

About the Authors

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Randall Rothenberg

Randall Rothenberg is President and Chief Executive Officer, IAB



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Townsend Feehan

Townsend Feehan is Chief Executive Officer, IAB Europe






Make Mobile Work continues with Design with Device in Mind

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On Tuesday, May 13th IAB’s Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence hosted our second Make Mobile Work webinar of the four-part series. Devoted to cross-screen creative and “Designing with Device in Mind” we had a great discussion with insights from Xaxis, Doubleclick and Tremor Video. View the full webinar, download the slides and sign up for future webinars here.

As we continue our call to help marketers navigate mobile and cross-screen opportunities - we’ve invited Time, Inc. to share some additional studies of brands successfully connecting with their always-on, device-agnostic, digital consumers. Additionally, be sure to check out the Mobile Center’s new launched creative and case study showcases page where you can see examples of HTML5 mobile and tablet creative as well as cross-screen case studies from our members.

The Driven Campaign 
A Time Inc. Digital Experience 
Coming from a publisher’s point of view there are several important factors when addressing cross-screen capabilities for our sites and ad campaigns.  With upwards of 50% of our digital audience visiting us from mobile devices, and growing, it makes cross-screen strategies an imperative from both the user experience and business operations point of view. Today Time Inc. has 21 Tablet Magazines, 25 Mobile & Tablet Apps, and 19 Mobile Websites  ̶  many of which are going through responsive design reboots. 

For this post I’m going to focus on a specific campaign we created for Land Rover that was powered by our Watercooler LIVE content marketing platform. The platform comprises several unique products and capabilities that come together like Voltron to help marketers win the battle for attention and engage with audiences across devices.  

In the demos below you can see the Land Rover - “Driven” campaign as it renders for users across multiple environments. Time Inc. curated the “Driven” campaign content from paid, owned, and earned media channels into a responsive site that was iFramed into landroverusa.com/driven. We also put a re-direct on that domain pointing to a standalone site for users coming from mobile devices in order to ensure an ideal user experience for every device.  

This is how visits were divided by screen:
  • 66% Desktop
  • 12% Tablet
  • 20% Smart Phone
The HTML5 responsive site worked seamlessly across screens and was also engineered to provide dynamic content to its accompanying Time Amplify ad units. All of our products are designed to increase both reach and engagement by allowing advertisers to take context (Time Inc. content) to go.  Through our data assets and platform connections, we were able to run these units both on and off of the Time Inc. network, finding our audience at the right place, at the right time, and on the right device. As part of this campaign, we also created a custom unit to roadblock sponsored editorial content and provide users with another opportunity to engage with the “Driven” campaign as a 100% opt-in experience. The video below showcases the Time Amplify units that dynamically pair Sports Illustrated content to the “Driven” campaign elements. 
Using MOAT analytics to measure in-view and interaction across all screens, we delivered the equivalent of over 10 years of measured in-view time across desktop, mobile and tablet in a two-month period. As you can see, the “Driven” campaign really benefited from us taking device into consideration from the outset. The campaign garnered an average engagement rate north of 7% and Average Time Spent across all elements of the campaign of nearly a minute. Great results across the board.

Here are a few tips for marketers wondering where to get started for a winning cross-screen strategy of their own. Developing for cross-screen has never been easier:
  • Start with the basics - Campaign objectives, creative brief, brand guidelines
  • Tailor your objectives to fit each screen—While you can leverage desktop assets across screens you should be mindful of screen size, bandwidth, and device-specific user behavior
  • Leverage platforms and tools to develop/experiment in faster cycles
  • Chart your users’ journey and create meaningful touch points using the screen and technology that’s most appropriate
  • Measure the metrics that matter for each screen and look at campaign results both holistically and in detail A/B test, measure, analyze, improve, and repeat
  • Always identify what could be done better and incorporate that learning into the next campaign

At Time Inc., we strive to leverage large, impactful, flexible, and standardized canvases — including the IAB rising stars — by painting them with dynamic, content-driven ad experiences that feel authentic to consumers and drive engagement and results for marketers. Make sure your partners are equally committed to approaching cross-screen in a way that resonates with your customers. 


About the Authors


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Belinda J. Smith is Senior Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the Interactive Advertising Bureau



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Sam Mansour

Sam Mansour is Director of Digital Ad Product Experience at Time Inc


Digital Video In-Stream Metrics Released!

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If you are familiar with the story of the Tower of Babel, you’re aware of the potential power behind a commonly understood language. When everyone accepts definitions in the same way, the chance of confusion is eliminated and time can be spent more efficiently in progressing forward rather than having to consistently translate various interpretations. Digital Video In-Stream Metrics serve this exact purpose for buyers and sellers of digital video in-stream advertising, and have played an important role in maturing the industry and supporting its evolution. 

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Digital video is a fast moving marketing channel undergoing a large amount of innovation and technical functionality, so the industry will need to periodically review and revise standards to reflect the needs of current practice. The last update to the metrics was in 2008, so IAB convened a working group to modernize the metrics but we found during comment periods that there were some prevailing questions that we chose to address outside of the document. 

We hosted the webinar, Digital Video Metrics Modernized to provide an overview of the document and addressed those questions, and as an added layer of clarity we have outlined them in an FAQ. Ultimately, our goal is to enable growth in the industry. We do this by building and maintaining consensus around the use of these metrics and concepts so that buyers understand sellers and transparency is established.


FAQ Digital Video In-Stream Metric Definitions 

Why not combine the metric definitions with the Impression Measurement Guidelines?

IAB Impression Measurement Guidelines, which have been developed for display, mobile and digital video, describe technical details for how an ad impression should be counted in each of the specified contexts. Each of the Impression Measurement Guidelines documents is used in the industry to establish sound measurement practices for ad impressions. 

In contrast, the Digital Video In-Stream Metric Definition document, simply describe a baseline of interactive metrics that companies can voluntarily track in digital video. No technical guidelines are imposed for how each metric is measured, allowing companies make the best use of their technology while offering the Industry a common definition for select interactive digital video metrics.

Why isn’t viewability covered in the update to metric definitions for digital in-stream video?

Viewability in digital video is a more complex issue than simply defining a term. The 2014 Digital In-Stream Video Metric Definitions only defines a baseline set of interactive metrics that the industry can use as a common lexicon. However, establishing common measurement practices for determining whether an ad is in view requires a process that identifies and addresses technical and operational challenges. The Make Measurements Make Sense (3MS) initiative is leading the efforts toward more effective impression measurements. As a standard becomes adopted in the industry, these metric definitions may be updated to reflect relevant changes.

We serve video ads into 300x250 placements on websites. Why is this being excluded from the definition for digital video in-stream video ads?

The format of an ad does not make it a digital video in-stream video ad; the context into which the ad is served defines digital in-stream video ads. The technology for receiving and executing ads is different and requires different resources when the ad is served into a webpage and when served into a video player. Video ads that are served into a webpage are commonly known as in-banner video ads and are executed by the browser. Separately, ads served into a player are received and executed by the player—each of which may be built using proprietary code. Therefore, only ads served to a player (video or otherwise), constitute a digital in-stream video ad.

What constitutes a “player?”

In the context of digital in-stream video, a player is a browser-based computer program that executes videos, animation, or games that streams publisher content.

One advertising strategy we use is to stream short clips of content along with ads into a display placement on a publisher’s webpage. Our ads are played before, during, or after the content we serve, and they’re served into a player. Are our ads considered digital in-stream video ads?

If the content being streamed belongs to the same publisher that also owns the webpage content into which you are serving the clips and ads, then yes. For example, a news publisher may post several short news clips in the sidebar of their page. Ads served into these news clips are considered digital in-stream video ads.

However, if the content belongs to publishers other than the one who owns the page content, and especially if that content is served to a display ad placement on the page, the content is a form of advertising. In this case, the content, as well as the ads served with it, are being served to the webpage and classified as in-page, or in-banner video ads.

Is mobile covered in this metric definition update?

Ads served into browser-based players that stream publisher content are considered digital in-stream ads, regardless of the device in which they play. However, mobile devices present some challenges to tracking ad interactions. Native players in mobile devices are capable of playing content while offline and therefore lack the persistent connection required for communicating ad interactions in real time. For now, the 2014 Digital In-Stream Video Metric Definitions are restricted to the context of live streaming content. However, to the extent possible, these metric definitions may be applied to native digital players in mobile.

Are the ads we serve into games considered digital in-stream video ads?

Yes, game publishers may sell ad inventory that is served into their browser-based game players. Ads served into these players are considered digital in-stream video ads.


About the Author
Jessica Anderson
Jessica Anderson is Senior Manager of Advertising Technology at IAB. 





There is no doubt that mobile gaming is a hot topic that is attracting the notice of brand advertisers. Mobile gaming is growing significantly due to three key trends:
  1. Growth in smartphone and tablet usage (according to the IAB Mobile Center research, as of January 2014, 57% of all US adults owned a smartphone and 44% owned a tablet)
  2. Increasing sophistication in mobile app ecosystem
  3. Growing willingness among consumers to pay for virtual goods and accept mobile advertising
Mobile game monetization comes from:
  1. Virtual goods
  2. Paid apps and downloads
  3. Advertising
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Per eMarketer, mobile game monetization is projected to increase significantly over the next four years. All three of the primary monetization models—downloads, in-game/virtual goods, and ad-supported—will grow, but the mix will shift in favor of in-game/virtual goods.
 
For these reasons, the IAB Games and Mobile Committees convened a Town Hall discussion titled “The Future of Mobile Game Advertising.” Susan Borst, Director of Industry Initiatives and the IAB lead for the Games Committee stated that interest in game advertising has never been higher and bringing these two committees together is important given that nearly a third of all time spent on mobile is on games. Joe Lazlo, Senior Director of the IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence added that successful game advertising has much to teach the rest of the mobile ecosystem.

Following a welcome and some perspective on the state of mobile games advertising from event host, Jeff Colen, Ad Sales & Marketing at Zynga, Lewis Ward, Research Director of Gaming at IDC, shared some background information on smartphone growth and share, consumer spending on games and consumer sentiment for game play by device.
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Lewis noted the growth of the tablet for game play, and in particular the iPad as gamer’s favorite iOS devices. He went on to say that significant demographic differences exist across the various mobile platforms, notably HH income and gender, which have obvious implications for game developers and advertisers. For instance, the IDC study showed a big disposable income gap between iOS and Android, and game play on Kindle Fire skews heavily female.

Defining and sizing smartphone and tablet ads is “tricky due to technology fragmentation and the rapid pace of market innovation and evolution,” said Lewis, and the audience agreed. This is an area where the IAB could work to provide some clarity. 


Source: IDC
PANEL DISCUSSION
The key takeaway from the Town Hall discussion is that there has been a significant and important shift in just the past year or so and the momentum is building.  
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Key Highlights:

  1. Ad format evolution taking place: From advertising that offers player rewards, value exchange video advertising, rich media creative, branded content and more native integration—ads on games are becoming less aggravating—and more frictionless. 
    • There is an overall increased acceptance of advertising among users when advertising is executed in a way that brings value to their experience, is contextually relevant, delivered in a format that is visually appealing or synergistic to their mobile experience. Benjani highlighted inMobi’s focus on “working with studios and brands to create deeply integrated native ad experiences to connect advertisers to audiences globally.”
    • Emotional targeting that is additive to game play (creating value exchange between advertiser and user) tapping into players’ emotions and serving ads in the right place at the right time with the right message is a win for both advertisers and consumers. This allows the brand to be a welcome “hero” for the player, taking part in the user experience and offering players rewards during moments of “achievement” or tips at points of “frustration.” 
    • “In-game advertising is the only way brand marketers can reach and reward, encourage and rescue players in a way that adds value to the user experience. For example, during Breakthrough Moments™ (BTMs™), brands can reach game players during moments of “achievement,” such as when they get a new high score or a longest jump. With this approach, people will reciprocate the brand’s gift and take a post ad action—such as purchase a product or visit a website—and further engage with the brand, giving marketers a unique way to make lasting, meaningful connections with people,” said Brandt.
  1. Increasing focus on brand metrics: As Lewis noted, CPM, CPC, CPA and CPV all have some traction in mobile games, but increasingly, better brand metrics, analytics and real-time decisioning are changing the way effectiveness is measured. “Keep in mind as to where your ads are running as not all impressions are equal. If your primary KPI is to deliver a positive brand experience and association, look at where the ad is running and ask if you were playing this game - would you feel interrupted by or helped by this advertisement? User experience is at the paramount of successfully advertising on mobile and simply porting over outdated ad units and placements from display advertising is not enough. These are personal experiences on mobile and the key is tailor advertising to match this new medium”, said O’Connor.
  2. More options for developers and advertisers: From in-app to HTML5, more options are emerging for game developers and advertisers to foster “native” experiences. Grossberg added: “Brands are also beginning to leverage HTML5 to create their own mobile web games (the game is the advertising!) to engage their target audience at scale through this preferred activity on mobile, and do so in a cost effective manner in a way that fosters social and viral growth.”
Mobile game integration is a reality and has become industry standard for marketers.  The IAB Games Committee is  finalizing a white paper titled “The Games Advertising Ecosystem” report which is intended to help the industry understand today’s game play, the core game types and advertising categories for marketers to reach consumers.  Stay tuned!

About the Author

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Kym Nelson

Kym Nelson serves as an IAB Games Committee Co-Chair and is Senior Vice President of Sales at Twitch TV, the world’s largest live-streaming video platform. In this role since May, 2013, she has created Twitch Media Group, launching an inside, direct-sales media group at Twitch. She is responsible for creating and leading a world-class sales organization that delivers completely new and innovative digital solutions on a platform that is spearheading digital media as we know it today.