Results tagged “Video” from IABlog

From the Winter Olympics to a fantastic World Cup, it’s already been a great year for sports around the world. And as the summer baseball season unfolds in the US, the IAB Mobile Center and InMobi have collaborated to publish a look at how US consumers use their smartphones to plan and purchase tickets to sporting events.

This report completes a trilogy of studies examining mobile and ticketing. Previously we looked at mobile and movies and mobile and live theater and music performances. Like those event categories, sports benefits greatly from the ease and convenience of the mobile internet.

Among the key findings from the sports research:

  • 85% of mobile sports fans turn to mobile after seeing ads for entertainment events on other channels. 
  • 49% of mobile sports fans say they find information about entertainment activities via mobile, making that channel more important than PC and print for entertainment information.
  • 78% of mobile sports fans use their mobiles to help plan trips to watch live sporting events.
  • Sports fans use their devices during games to record videos and watch replays.
  • 1 out of 3 mobile sports fans purchases game tickets directly through their phones or tablets. Box office, online and mobile are now all major sources of ticket sales. 

Sports_website_graphic-1.png

Like mobile consumers generally, mobile sports fans gravitate toward ads that combine fun and relevance. Sports marketers seeking to make mobile an MVP on their media team should remember that 36% of this group prefer ads that showcase video, sound, and photos; 33% like deals or other promotions; 28% like pre-sale ticket opportunities; and 27% like ads that feature their favorite sports team.

It’s hard to imagine a category of marketer that’s a more natural fit for mobile than entertainment ticketing. Whether it’s a spontaneous movie night, the game of the year, or the concert of a lifetime, mobile has the immediacy and relevance to help a fan learn what’s going on, act on that, and share the experience with friends and the world. We hope these three studies help open marketers’ eyes to the value that mobile brings to the world of event ticketing, and look forward to seeing even tighter and better integration of mobile into sports, music, theater, event, and movie marketing.


About the Author

sp_laszlo_joe.jpg

Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 



DCNF_logo_square_2014.jpg

In this, the final installment of the IABlog series, “IAB Asks NewFront Sellers,” NewFront founders and presenters share what excites them the most with regard to digital video content, advertising, and the NewFronts.  Here’s what they had to say:

Ben Dietz, VP Sales & Business Development, VICE Media 

We’re excited about the IAB Rising Stars, in terms of their ability to incorporate video into certain units. We think longer-form video is going to continue to be a mode that people adopt. A quarter of all videos on YouTube right now are 20 minutes or longer. So there’s a huge appetite and a huge shift in the desire to consume longer pieces of content. Ads can probably get longer and less “selly” as a result. 

Jack Bamberger, Head of Agency and Industry Relations, AOL

People should attend AOL’s NewFront on April 29th and they’ll find out. We’ve got some surprises ad exciting announcements that we’ll be unveiling at the NewFront separate from our slate. Last year we were very bold in measurement, very bold in original content, and there’s no reason to expect anything but a continuation of AOL investing more in video. A great example is our acquisition from September of last year Adap.TV and what does that mean to the industry in terms of programmatic video. 

Jonathan Perelman, GM of Video & VP Agency Strategy, BuzzFeed 

It’s about highlighting ways that brands can do really compelling, sharable, video content. That to me is not pre-roll or TrueView ads, but it’s actually custom, bespoke, branded videos that tap into learnings and understandings about what makes video successful and doing that with brands. That’s what I’m really excited about and what we at BuzzFeed have been doing and are really excited to do a lot more of. NewFronts_LogoLock5.jpg

Peter Naylor, SVP Advertising, Hulu

As content consumption continues to be a multi-screen experience, we will see more ad formats with the ability to run across different platforms. On Hulu, we see over 3,000 multi-platform combinations used to watch Hulu Plus each month. For example, I watch Hulu Plus on an iPhone, iPad and my PC. I find that stat to be highly illustrative of the direction consumers are headed. And we can’t just follow where consumers are going, we have to always lead and be one step ahead. So, the ability to run ads across different platforms is a big trend. Another big trend - geo targeting, and ads that are targeted to local viewers.

The Hulu Upfront will take place April 30th in New York, and we’re excited to talk about how we are staying ahead of industry trends and innovating in the space on behalf of our advertising partners, content partners and users. I don’t want to give away too much (you’ll have to wait for the upfront!) but we’ll be sharing some new ways we can help advertisers reach their target audience through innovative new formats, alongside great new programming on our platform.

Jason Krebs, Head of Sales, and Erin McPherson, Chief Content Officer, Maker Studios

Krebs: Everything we’ve touched on [for this Q&A] are trends, because they’re very early. Either it’s Erin fielding different calls from new creators in Hollywood, traditional again, who’ve never done anything online. We have advertisers also asking us about potential new ways that we can take our creators and get them involved in their story. How are things happening socially? Are people sharing these? What are the view times? What are their browsing habits? Are they stumbling upon content? Are they tuning in? We have the whole subscription notion of YouYube. Many of the biggest subscribed channels in YouTube across the earth are Maker creators, and what does that mean? What’s a publishing cycle look? How often should we be producing this content? Where are people coming from when they’ve come to that content? Where do they go after? All of these things. We haven’t said the word data yet, so now I’m saying the word data. All those points are completely brand new. The trend of using all of that so everyone is better at what they do, advertisers and creators and consumers, it’s all early on and very exciting. 

McPherson: For a while now native has been a buzzword. People use that word loosely and broadly. We certainly use it when we’re talking about advertising that is truly organic to the consumer. Native content can be a creative idea that we work on with a brand. Native can also encompass a kind of ad that we’re in the early days of seeing in video. I’ll call it a smart ad, a targeted ad, an ad that understands what consumers’ behavior and interests are. We’re in the early days with video in personalization, really being able to customize not just your video content, but your video ad experience.

About the 2014 Digital Content NewFronts
Each year, thousands of people attend the Digital Content NewFronts to witness great new original video content, learn marketing best practices, and hear headline-grabbing announcements about partnerships that will change the course of the digital medium. This powerful series of presentations proves that digital video is the right place for brands to engage with consumers because consumers are engaging with digital video. Presenters include AOL, DigitasLBi, Google/YouTube, Hulu, Microsoft, Yahoo, and more. Learn More & See Schedule

IAB Cross-Screen Marketplace, Spotlight: Video, May 15, 2014
If you’re interested in digital video, IAB is bringing together thought leaders from both brands and agencies for the IAB Cross-Screen Marketplace. We’ll reveal how the buy and sell side are partnering to develop, deploy, and evaluate the success of multi-screen/multi-channel content and brand experiences, and the increasingly powerful role video is playing in this revolution. Learn More & See Agenda


DCNF_logo_square_2014.jpg

In this installment of the IABlog series, NewFront founders and presenters reveal how they see the relationship between emerging video consumption devices and good, old TV. We asked them: 

There’s a theory that mobile video and connected TV will start taking big chunks of consumer and advertising time out of basic cable fare. Is this happening? If not, why not?

Jonathan Perelman, GM of Video & VP Agency Strategy, BuzzFeed

Over half of our views are coming on mobile. I wrote something recently that said, for the last 7-10 years, people have been wondering if it’s the year of mobile. The reality is every year is the year of mobile ever since then. I was on the subway this morning and someone was watching a full-on movie on their phone. That 5 years ago was not something anyone would ever consider. Mobile is only going to grow and become more and more important to consumers and thus to advertisers. 

IAB: Do you think mobile is competing with TV at all audience time or advertising budget? 

Perelman: No, but we do see a lot of BuzzFeed video being watched during primetime, which that means someone is presumably sitting on their sofa maybe watching something else while on a social network. Someone passes along a video to them, and they’re going to click and play it while they’re watching something else. So I think, there’s maybe a burgeoning competition, but in terms of numbers and dollars it’s not so much a completion. 

Peter Naylor, SVP Advertising, Hulu

Everyone is limited to just 24 hours a day. That’s a constant. The variable is how people choose to spend their time, of course. There’s been a trend for many years that points to the rise of time spent with media and the rise of multi-tasking. So the media pie is getting bigger, but the slices of the pie are getting thinner. People now have the ability to time shift, device shift and place shift their media, and they are taking full advantage of all screens. We are essentially competing for mindshare and time share -quality content coupled with a best-in-class user experience is the key to being an essential part of a consumers daily entertainment choices.NewFronts_LogoLock4.jpg

Erin McPherson, Chief Content Officer, and Jason Krebs, Head of Sales, Maker Studios

McPherson: A lot of folks from the TV industry side say, “TV’s never been healthier,” which in many ways is true. The data I’ve looked at most recently showed consumption rising on traditional television platforms, as well as on digital. The secret here lies in—I won’t even call it second screen because second screen has come to mean a screen that interplays with your first screen—I’ll call it multiscreen. They are watching YouTube videos while they have the game on. Or they’re watching video in their Facebook or Twitter feeds, while they’ve have a reality show on. So the television is on but are people watching?  How are they watching and how are they engaging? At Maker, consumers don’t just view, they engage. 

Krebs: It’s the classic lean back and lean forward. We have a lot of lean forward, people interacting with the content, with the comments, with the sharing, as well as interacting with the ads themselves. We have a pretty vibrant business in ad creative that is purely interactive, where people can dive in more. 

Ben Dietz, VP Sales & Business Development, VICE Media

It’s not like we study the Nielsen ratings and go “ABC morning news is down 20%.” It’s more anecdotal, what we hear from our millennial audience. They’re consuming more on mobile. They’re consuming more online. They’re consuming more in a time-shifted fashion, and then beyond that they’re looking deeper into content that falls outside of mainstream broadcasts. We hear loud and clear from our audience that they’re shifting away, and that we believe very firmly that with audience will come dollars. It’s not happening as quickly as we’d like and there are inequities in the marketplace such as the rate that we can get for mobile, which needs to come to parity quickly. But we see it happening, and it will happen more in the future.

About the 2014 Digital Content NewFronts
Each year, thousands of people attend the Digital Content NewFronts to witness great new original video content, learn marketing best practices, and hear headline-grabbing announcements about partnerships that will change the course of the digital medium. This powerful series of presentations proves that digital video is the right place for brands to engage with consumers because consumers are engaging with digital video. Presenters include AOL, DigitasLBi, Google/YouTube, Hulu, Microsoft, Yahoo, and more. Learn More & See Schedule

IAB Cross-Screen Marketplace, Spotlight: Video, May 15, 2014
If you’re interested in digital video, IAB is bringing together thought leaders from both brands and agencies for the IAB Cross-Screen Marketplace. We’ll reveal how the buy and sell side are partnering to develop, deploy, and evaluate the success of multi-screen/multi-channel content and brand experiences, and the increasingly powerful role video is playing in this revolution. Learn More & See Agenda

Enhanced by Zemanta

There is no doubt that mobile gaming is a hot topic that is attracting the notice of brand advertisers. Mobile gaming is growing significantly due to three key trends:
  1. Growth in smartphone and tablet usage (according to the IAB Mobile Center research, as of January 2014, 57% of all US adults owned a smartphone and 44% owned a tablet)
  2. Increasing sophistication in mobile app ecosystem
  3. Growing willingness among consumers to pay for virtual goods and accept mobile advertising
Mobile game monetization comes from:
  1. Virtual goods
  2. Paid apps and downloads
  3. Advertising
eMarketer.jpg
Per eMarketer, mobile game monetization is projected to increase significantly over the next four years. All three of the primary monetization models—downloads, in-game/virtual goods, and ad-supported—will grow, but the mix will shift in favor of in-game/virtual goods.
 
For these reasons, the IAB Games and Mobile Committees convened a Town Hall discussion titled “The Future of Mobile Game Advertising.” Susan Borst, Director of Industry Initiatives and the IAB lead for the Games Committee stated that interest in game advertising has never been higher and bringing these two committees together is important given that nearly a third of all time spent on mobile is on games. Joe Lazlo, Senior Director of the IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence added that successful game advertising has much to teach the rest of the mobile ecosystem.

Following a welcome and some perspective on the state of mobile games advertising from event host, Jeff Colen, Ad Sales & Marketing at Zynga, Lewis Ward, Research Director of Gaming at IDC, shared some background information on smartphone growth and share, consumer spending on games and consumer sentiment for game play by device.
Zygna_IDC.jpg

MobileGraph.jpg
Lewis noted the growth of the tablet for game play, and in particular the iPad as gamer’s favorite iOS devices. He went on to say that significant demographic differences exist across the various mobile platforms, notably HH income and gender, which have obvious implications for game developers and advertisers. For instance, the IDC study showed a big disposable income gap between iOS and Android, and game play on Kindle Fire skews heavily female.

Defining and sizing smartphone and tablet ads is “tricky due to technology fragmentation and the rapid pace of market innovation and evolution,” said Lewis, and the audience agreed. This is an area where the IAB could work to provide some clarity. 


Source: IDC
PANEL DISCUSSION
The key takeaway from the Town Hall discussion is that there has been a significant and important shift in just the past year or so and the momentum is building.  
PanelGroup.jpg
Key Highlights:

  1. Ad format evolution taking place: From advertising that offers player rewards, value exchange video advertising, rich media creative, branded content and more native integration—ads on games are becoming less aggravating—and more frictionless. 
    • There is an overall increased acceptance of advertising among users when advertising is executed in a way that brings value to their experience, is contextually relevant, delivered in a format that is visually appealing or synergistic to their mobile experience. Benjani highlighted inMobi’s focus on “working with studios and brands to create deeply integrated native ad experiences to connect advertisers to audiences globally.”
    • Emotional targeting that is additive to game play (creating value exchange between advertiser and user) tapping into players’ emotions and serving ads in the right place at the right time with the right message is a win for both advertisers and consumers. This allows the brand to be a welcome “hero” for the player, taking part in the user experience and offering players rewards during moments of “achievement” or tips at points of “frustration.” 
    • “In-game advertising is the only way brand marketers can reach and reward, encourage and rescue players in a way that adds value to the user experience. For example, during Breakthrough Moments™ (BTMs™), brands can reach game players during moments of “achievement,” such as when they get a new high score or a longest jump. With this approach, people will reciprocate the brand’s gift and take a post ad action—such as purchase a product or visit a website—and further engage with the brand, giving marketers a unique way to make lasting, meaningful connections with people,” said Brandt.
  1. Increasing focus on brand metrics: As Lewis noted, CPM, CPC, CPA and CPV all have some traction in mobile games, but increasingly, better brand metrics, analytics and real-time decisioning are changing the way effectiveness is measured. “Keep in mind as to where your ads are running as not all impressions are equal. If your primary KPI is to deliver a positive brand experience and association, look at where the ad is running and ask if you were playing this game - would you feel interrupted by or helped by this advertisement? User experience is at the paramount of successfully advertising on mobile and simply porting over outdated ad units and placements from display advertising is not enough. These are personal experiences on mobile and the key is tailor advertising to match this new medium”, said O’Connor.
  2. More options for developers and advertisers: From in-app to HTML5, more options are emerging for game developers and advertisers to foster “native” experiences. Grossberg added: “Brands are also beginning to leverage HTML5 to create their own mobile web games (the game is the advertising!) to engage their target audience at scale through this preferred activity on mobile, and do so in a cost effective manner in a way that fosters social and viral growth.”
Mobile game integration is a reality and has become industry standard for marketers.  The IAB Games Committee is  finalizing a white paper titled “The Games Advertising Ecosystem” report which is intended to help the industry understand today’s game play, the core game types and advertising categories for marketers to reach consumers.  Stay tuned!

About the Author

KymNelson.png

Kym Nelson

Kym Nelson serves as an IAB Games Committee Co-Chair and is Senior Vice President of Sales at Twitch TV, the world’s largest live-streaming video platform. In this role since May, 2013, she has created Twitch Media Group, launching an inside, direct-sales media group at Twitch. She is responsible for creating and leading a world-class sales organization that delivers completely new and innovative digital solutions on a platform that is spearheading digital media as we know it today. 

What's a VAST?!? Understanding IAB Digital Video Suite

| | Comments

Digital Video has become a thriving advertising channel that enables rich, DigitalSimplifed.jpgengaging creative messaging and provides interaction opportunities with consumers. You may not know about the technical nuts and bolts behind digital video advertising, so to help you, we’ve created a short educational video, “IAB Digital Simplified: Understanding IAB Digital Video Suite”.  This video, narrated by Adapt.tv’s Founder and Chief Product Officer, Teg Grenager, breaks down the processes of digital video advertising and illustrates the technical concepts of the IAB Digital Video Suite (V-Suite). Now you can quickly gain baseline knowledge on some of the critical work developed by IAB members to benefit the interactive advertising industry.

VsuiteVideoImage.jpgAs for digital video advertising, it may not have ever scaled without the help of VAST and VPAID, two specs that are part of the V-Suite. In December 2013, 188.2 million Americans watched a staggering 52.4 billion online content videos.  This amounted to 35.2 billion video ad views and 13.2 billion minutes spent watching video ads for the month.  Additionally in December, 86.9% of the U.S. Internet audience viewed online video.* Recent estimates show U.S. digital video ad spending will nearly double in four years, climbing from $4.14 billion in 2013 to $8.04 billion in 2016.**

Adoption and use of the IAB V-Suite technical specifications have helped in this growth of the digital video marketplace and IAB seeks to encourage further adoption.  We know the full specification isn’t easy reading, so we invite you to check out this video and share it with your colleagues and partners. You’ll be empowered to speak about digital video and these specifications.

The IAB and its member companies have worked extensively to create an interoperable environment for video ad delivery across the digital supply chain. IAB Digital Video Committee working groups representing the industry have invested in long-term collaboration to create a suite of protocols that helps reduce operational complexity for video ad delivery. The result is the IAB Digital Video Suite, which includes three specifications: VAST, VPAID and VMAP. Each one plays a different role to enable communication between video ads and video players, and to simulate a TV ad experience with enhanced interaction.

As with many things in our industry, we’re only going to see more development and progress out of Digital Video. In fact, we’ve already seen attempts at integrating these specifications to work with technology involving connected TVs and cable networks. To stay on top of the issues and learn more about what’s happening in Digital Video, get looped into the Digital Video Committee.

For more information on the IAB Digital Video Suite go to: iab.net/vsuite or email [email protected].








Enhanced by Zemanta

paidOwnedEarned01c.jpeg

Recently there has been significant attention given to the growing importance of “visual content” as part of the paid, owned and earned media marketing mix. The headlines tell the story:

forbes1.png

Beyond the obvious of visually enhancing your online content and helping to give your brand an identity, it is clear that images, whether they are photography, video or infographics, are playing an increasingly important strategic role on many fronts. From content sharing and user generated content, to driving referral traffic and impact on SEO ranking, the discussion about visual content creation is intensifying daily.

A recent and widely circulated infographic from M Booth well illustrates the growing importance of visual content in social media. We asked new IAB member Shareaholic, whose Traffic Sources data is featured in this infographic, to provide some perspective on their findings, and to share their thoughts on how visual content is impacting the paid, owned and earned media mix including what may be in store for the future.

headshot.png“The data shown in the M Booth infographic is based on traffic trends to our publisher network websites, which show that Pinterest is now the fourth largest source of referral traffic, exceeding Twitter and Google referral traffic and, for the first time, exceeding Yahoo! Organic. It is interesting to note is that Pinterest isn’t even in our top 10 most popular social networks for social sharing - meaning that click-throughs on pins are driven by a smaller percentage of organic pins.”
— Janet Aronica, Head of Marketing, Shareaholic, @JanetAronica


chart14234.png

chart2144233.png

Source: Shareaholic. Data based on traffic to 200,000+ websites.
 

“For brands who choose to invest time in Pinterest, we feel that optimizing owned media with images and Pinterest buttons is rather obvious advice. But most importantly, marketers should use content analytics tools like Shareaholic to learn how visitors discover their content and where their opportunities are. Part of this means re-thinking earned media. Pinterest boards are content, and pins are another form of earned media. Just like you build relationships with journalists, building relationships with the community members who pin your content and content similar to yours should be part of your POEM strategy. This is why we also offer Shareaholic Analytics, so publishers can actually see a breakdown of who the most influential sharers are, making those connections happen as efficiently as possible. Moving forward, it’s important to think about visual content for Pinterest as well as other social media sources. In August, nearly 33% of traffic to our publishers’ sites was referral traffic - those are your social media sources. It’s not just about Pinterest. It is important to include images for Pinterest, but it is also important to set featured images for content so that shares to platforms like Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn look as ‘appetizing’ as possible to entice click-throughs from the potential readers who see them.”

This blog series focuses on key areas of interest within the realm of paid, owned and earned media and taps into the expertise of IAB Social Media Committee members to share insights and best practices. What’s your take on the importance of visual content creation? Join in the conversation by commenting here or posting comments and/or questions using #IABPOEM.

About the Author

sp_borst_susan.jpg

Susan Borst

Susan Borst is the Director, Industry Initiatives at the IAB focusing on Social Media, B2B, and Games. She can be reached on Twitter @susanborst.

An Inside Look at Hulu Ad Swap

| | Comments

When we pursue a research project to advance our goal of building the world’s most effective advertising service, we start with some foundational questions: What problem(s) will the innovation solve? Can it scale? How will we measure the effects? What are the paths to increasing monetization? Will this create value for our customers?

Of course, we asked these same questions when designing Hulu Ad Swap, announced live today onstage from the IAB MIXX Conference & Expo during NY Advertising Week. Hulu Ad Swap is the next evolution in user choice and control—an ad innovation designed to dramatically improve the advertising experience for users and results for brands. Hulu Ad Swap puts complete control in the hands of the user by enabling them to instantly swap out of an ad they are watching for one that is more relevant.

We conducted research to determine whether Hulu Ad Swap could quantify (in both statistically reliable and valid terms) the improvement of the ad experience for advertisers and viewers across a variety of dimensions.

Going into the study, our thesis was that users wanted more choice and control, and  advertisers wanted to eliminate waste (via targeting) and drive better outcomes (improved effectiveness measures).  A recent Advertiser Perceptions study commissioned by the IAB entitled, An Inside Look at Demand Side Perceptions of Video Advertising quantified the criteria that advertisers, marketers, TV and online video buyers look for in their online video partnerships. Here’s what they stated (in rank order):

1. Targeting 82% - 88%
2. Results 85% - 86%
3. Reach 68% - 84%
4. Cost 28% - 46%

Advertisers want better targeting and results, and viewers want more choice and relevancy, so naturally the question we wanted to address was simple: through a format rooted in choice, could we deliver on improved relevancy and results? 
Our success measures were the predictive success measures that brand marketers use: Brand recall, favorability and purchase intent.  

Results from the research study were very positive. Video ads that a user proactively chose to swap into (versus a video ad that was served at random) performed to a significantly greater degree than those that were not:

  • Unaided Recall of the brand went from 30% to 58% (+93%)
  • Aided Recall became near universal, from 59% to 91% (+54%)
  • Brand Favorability went from 34% to 43% (+27%)
  • Purchase Intent went from 23% to 31% (+35%)
  • Stated Relevancy went from 15% to 22% (+46%)

The measured performance of choice-based ad formats like Hulu Ad Swap illustrates why offering interactivity can be a powerful mechanism to improve the effectiveness of advertising. Interactive formats can significantly exceed the effectiveness and efficiency of traditional video ad formats for the following reasons:

  • Self-addressability—the consumer can choose the most relevant ad to them at that moment.
  • Increased attentiveness—when a choice is made, a viewer is invested in seeing the outcome.
  • Cognitive dissonance—consumers like to feel justified about the choices they make.

Going forward, we are not expecting all Hulu users to swap ads every time they are offered the option to swap. The power behind Hulu Ad Swap is that a user has maximum control over their ad experience, and can swap their ad if they choose to do so. In fact, we expect response rates of around three percent. But for those who do choose to interact with this feature, we’ll have learned a little more about their preferences. We can turn that learning into a better ad experience for our users, a better ad platform for our advertisers, and an improved monetization vehicle for our content partners.

We are continuing to research Hulu Ad Swap, and as we work to improve this ad innovation over time, our goal is to deliver both a more frictionless consumer advertising experience and even better results for our advertising customers.

With regards to the research we conducted on Hulu Ad Swap, there’s a more comprehensive research FAQ you can read here: Hulu Ad Swap Research Results.

About the Author

sp_schafer_bryon.jpgBryon Schafer
Director of Research & Sales Strategy, Hulu

Bryon Schafer is a member of the IAB Digital Video Committee and serves as Hulu’s director of research and sales strategy, where he is responsible for all research efforts across Hulu’s business units. This encompasses audience measurement, advertising and marketing research, as well as global market research in support of product development. In addition, Bryon leads the company’s advertising sales strategy, where he is tasked with “making it easy” for advertisers to buy Hulu. Prior to joining Hulu in 2008, Bryon held marketing and media research roles at Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group and ABC Television Network. Bryon holds a BA in Anthropology from Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, and he began his career in the media planning department of Ogilvy & Mather in New York City.