Results tagged “Online advertising” from IABlog

Digital Video In-Stream Metrics Released!

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If you are familiar with the story of the Tower of Babel, you’re aware of the potential power behind a commonly understood language. When everyone accepts definitions in the same way, the chance of confusion is eliminated and time can be spent more efficiently in progressing forward rather than having to consistently translate various interpretations. Digital Video In-Stream Metrics serve this exact purpose for buyers and sellers of digital video in-stream advertising, and have played an important role in maturing the industry and supporting its evolution. 

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Digital video is a fast moving marketing channel undergoing a large amount of innovation and technical functionality, so the industry will need to periodically review and revise standards to reflect the needs of current practice. The last update to the metrics was in 2008, so IAB convened a working group to modernize the metrics but we found during comment periods that there were some prevailing questions that we chose to address outside of the document. 

We hosted the webinar, Digital Video Metrics Modernized to provide an overview of the document and addressed those questions, and as an added layer of clarity we have outlined them in an FAQ. Ultimately, our goal is to enable growth in the industry. We do this by building and maintaining consensus around the use of these metrics and concepts so that buyers understand sellers and transparency is established.


FAQ Digital Video In-Stream Metric Definitions 

Why not combine the metric definitions with the Impression Measurement Guidelines?

IAB Impression Measurement Guidelines, which have been developed for display, mobile and digital video, describe technical details for how an ad impression should be counted in each of the specified contexts. Each of the Impression Measurement Guidelines documents is used in the industry to establish sound measurement practices for ad impressions. 

In contrast, the Digital Video In-Stream Metric Definition document, simply describe a baseline of interactive metrics that companies can voluntarily track in digital video. No technical guidelines are imposed for how each metric is measured, allowing companies make the best use of their technology while offering the Industry a common definition for select interactive digital video metrics.

Why isn’t viewability covered in the update to metric definitions for digital in-stream video?

Viewability in digital video is a more complex issue than simply defining a term. The 2014 Digital In-Stream Video Metric Definitions only defines a baseline set of interactive metrics that the industry can use as a common lexicon. However, establishing common measurement practices for determining whether an ad is in view requires a process that identifies and addresses technical and operational challenges. The Make Measurements Make Sense (3MS) initiative is leading the efforts toward more effective impression measurements. As a standard becomes adopted in the industry, these metric definitions may be updated to reflect relevant changes.

We serve video ads into 300x250 placements on websites. Why is this being excluded from the definition for digital video in-stream video ads?

The format of an ad does not make it a digital video in-stream video ad; the context into which the ad is served defines digital in-stream video ads. The technology for receiving and executing ads is different and requires different resources when the ad is served into a webpage and when served into a video player. Video ads that are served into a webpage are commonly known as in-banner video ads and are executed by the browser. Separately, ads served into a player are received and executed by the player—each of which may be built using proprietary code. Therefore, only ads served to a player (video or otherwise), constitute a digital in-stream video ad.

What constitutes a “player?”

In the context of digital in-stream video, a player is a browser-based computer program that executes videos, animation, or games that streams publisher content.

One advertising strategy we use is to stream short clips of content along with ads into a display placement on a publisher’s webpage. Our ads are played before, during, or after the content we serve, and they’re served into a player. Are our ads considered digital in-stream video ads?

If the content being streamed belongs to the same publisher that also owns the webpage content into which you are serving the clips and ads, then yes. For example, a news publisher may post several short news clips in the sidebar of their page. Ads served into these news clips are considered digital in-stream video ads.

However, if the content belongs to publishers other than the one who owns the page content, and especially if that content is served to a display ad placement on the page, the content is a form of advertising. In this case, the content, as well as the ads served with it, are being served to the webpage and classified as in-page, or in-banner video ads.

Is mobile covered in this metric definition update?

Ads served into browser-based players that stream publisher content are considered digital in-stream ads, regardless of the device in which they play. However, mobile devices present some challenges to tracking ad interactions. Native players in mobile devices are capable of playing content while offline and therefore lack the persistent connection required for communicating ad interactions in real time. For now, the 2014 Digital In-Stream Video Metric Definitions are restricted to the context of live streaming content. However, to the extent possible, these metric definitions may be applied to native digital players in mobile.

Are the ads we serve into games considered digital in-stream video ads?

Yes, game publishers may sell ad inventory that is served into their browser-based game players. Ads served into these players are considered digital in-stream video ads.


About the Author
Jessica Anderson
Jessica Anderson is Senior Manager of Advertising Technology at IAB. 





Make Mobile Work Kicks Off with "HTML5: The Mobile Opportunity"

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In case you haven’t heard - we here at the IAB’s Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence are on the charge to Make Mobile Work this year. Based on our research last year around marketer perceptions of mobile and roadblocks to broader adoption of mobile advertising we’re setting out to show brands and agencies how to overcome these issues (both real and perceived) and start engaging with audiences on all of their devices. 

Our first webinar took place last Tuesday, March 18 and was all about discovering the power of HTML5 to create superior mobile ad creative. More than 150 marketers, agency buyers and publishers joined in to hear the IAB, AOL and Google discuss the importance of mobile advertising and steps to get started using HTML5. The webinar showed the power of HTML5, increased engagement of these ads and a walk through of how one brand started down the path to adjust from a Flash-only strategy. You can view the webinar and accompanying materials here as well as explore upcoming sessions on Make Mobile Work.

To keep the conversation going, Mollie Spilman, EVP Global Sales & Operations at Millennial Media, one of the original signatories of our Open Letter to Marketers, shared the following findings:

Millennial Media HTML5 Report
Through the use of rich media, agencies and brands are creating clear, meaningful experiences for their audiences. They’re going beyond the banner to leverage unique features such as gamification, swipe galleries, voice recognition, video, and more - and seeing the benefits in spades. 

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In our latest Millennial Media S.M.A.R.T., we report on the impact rich media and video ads have on click-through rate (CTR) vs. standard banners. Automotive rich media and video ads, for example, saw an average of 3.5 times the CTR of standard banners. We’ve found that automotive advertisers often use video in their campaigns to show in-action driving, or dynamic ads that allow a consumer to swipe through different vehicle models or colors. Rich media and video ads run by education advertisers also saw 3.5 times greater CTR than standard banners. These brands incorporate animation, short quizzes, and video to get consumers thinking about their learning needs and resulting careers. Similarly, consumer goods’ rich media and video ads saw an average of 2.6 times the CTR compared to standard banner ads. Consumer goods advertisers tend to use video and interactive games to drive brand awareness.

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EY (Formerly Ernst & Young) is one company taking its brand awareness to the next level through rich media. In an effort to stay top of mind for - and appeal to - business and accounting majors interested in post-grad entry level positions, EY tapped Millennial Media and Mediahub/Mullen to craft an interactive, highly-targeted campaign. The creative teams collaborated on a strategy to take the main pillar of EY’s campaign, “Amazing from every angle,” and turn the messaging into an engaging experience that allowed mobile users to choose from a selection of origami figures and create them virtually through their smartphones’ touch screen. To ensure the creative reached the most relevant audience, Millennial Media also added deployed geo-location targeting capabilities to pinpoint, within two miles, the 57 pre-selected university campuses.
Rich media capabilities will continue to evolve as mobile devices evolve - but don’t wait! Creative teams are pushing the limits of mobile, much to the benefit and satisfaction of advertisers and consumers. 




About the Authors


sp_smith_belinda_100x134.jpgBelinda J. Smith

Belinda J. Smith is Senior Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the Interactive Advertising Bureau



Mollie Spilman_Millennial Media.jpgMollie Spilman

Mollie Spilman is EVP of Global Sales & Operations at Millennial Media



What's a VAST?!? Understanding IAB Digital Video Suite

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Digital Video has become a thriving advertising channel that enables rich, DigitalSimplifed.jpgengaging creative messaging and provides interaction opportunities with consumers. You may not know about the technical nuts and bolts behind digital video advertising, so to help you, we’ve created a short educational video, “IAB Digital Simplified: Understanding IAB Digital Video Suite”.  This video, narrated by Adapt.tv’s Founder and Chief Product Officer, Teg Grenager, breaks down the processes of digital video advertising and illustrates the technical concepts of the IAB Digital Video Suite (V-Suite). Now you can quickly gain baseline knowledge on some of the critical work developed by IAB members to benefit the interactive advertising industry.

VsuiteVideoImage.jpgAs for digital video advertising, it may not have ever scaled without the help of VAST and VPAID, two specs that are part of the V-Suite. In December 2013, 188.2 million Americans watched a staggering 52.4 billion online content videos.  This amounted to 35.2 billion video ad views and 13.2 billion minutes spent watching video ads for the month.  Additionally in December, 86.9% of the U.S. Internet audience viewed online video.* Recent estimates show U.S. digital video ad spending will nearly double in four years, climbing from $4.14 billion in 2013 to $8.04 billion in 2016.**

Adoption and use of the IAB V-Suite technical specifications have helped in this growth of the digital video marketplace and IAB seeks to encourage further adoption.  We know the full specification isn’t easy reading, so we invite you to check out this video and share it with your colleagues and partners. You’ll be empowered to speak about digital video and these specifications.

The IAB and its member companies have worked extensively to create an interoperable environment for video ad delivery across the digital supply chain. IAB Digital Video Committee working groups representing the industry have invested in long-term collaboration to create a suite of protocols that helps reduce operational complexity for video ad delivery. The result is the IAB Digital Video Suite, which includes three specifications: VAST, VPAID and VMAP. Each one plays a different role to enable communication between video ads and video players, and to simulate a TV ad experience with enhanced interaction.

As with many things in our industry, we’re only going to see more development and progress out of Digital Video. In fact, we’ve already seen attempts at integrating these specifications to work with technology involving connected TVs and cable networks. To stay on top of the issues and learn more about what’s happening in Digital Video, get looped into the Digital Video Committee.

For more information on the IAB Digital Video Suite go to: iab.net/vsuite or email [email protected].








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