Results tagged “Nielsen” from IABlog

3 Strategies to Reach Mobilecultural Users

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Top publishers, mobile and social media experts discuss how to reach multicultural audiences

On Thursday, February 21, 2013, the IAB in partnership with Social Media Week New York held “Mobilecultural: How to Reach the Emerging Mobile, Social and Multicultural User”, a discussion about how brands, marketers and publishers can reach multicultural audiences on social and mobile platforms. The IAB AdLab was packed with more than 100 attendees from agencies, publishers, and brand marketers. Panelists included representatives from all sides of the digital ecosystem, who were able to give a broad perspective how mobile and social media are converging for African American, Hispanic, and other multicultural audiences.

However, it’s not enough to just tell people where the industry is going, it’s better to show them. Monica Bannan, VP of Mobile Media at Nielsen dexterously set the stage with Nielsen’s newly released data that featured the latest trends and data on social and mobile media usage within the last year. Monica opened the presentation with data on how digital is becoming increasing mobile with 36 hours spent online vs. 34 hours spent on mobile devices. This data is in line with the mobile research done by the IAB Mobile Center such as Mobile’s Role in a Consumer’s Media Day.  Monica’s presentation also revealed how multicultural users are over-indexing on smartphone adoption with 74% by Asians and 68% by African American and Hispanic users. Such numbers reinforce not only the increasing growth of mobile but that multicultural usage of the mobile platform is growing at encouraging rates.

 Cheryl Contee, Co-Founder of Fission Strategy, Attentive.ly, and the popular blog Jack & Jill Politics greatly directed and moderated the panel discussion with thought leaders: 

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SMWmbc 2013

The conversation was exciting and dynamic, but if I had to pull out just three main takeaways from it they would be the following:

Marketers and brands must move toward mobile and social to engage users, particularly within multicultural audiences.  

Lateef Sarnor was able to hone in on what most of the thought leaders are seeing at their companies which is that “social is part of the DNA” and with the high adoption of mobile devices by multicultural users “those realities have informed mobile strategy and everything is becoming mobile first.” 

Marketers, advertisers and brands creating engaging multicultural content should avoid the pitfalls of a one-size-fits-all formula.  

As Adrian Carrasquillo said, “multicultural consumers don’t want a second rate experience just because it’s niche. You have to elevate the conversation.” Diana Valencia noted that when creating content for multicultural users “it’s important to play into cultural cues whether it’s with content, style or humor you have to differentiate that. This will enhance affinity and empathy of the consumer.”  

So, what is the future for publishers, marketers and brands reaching mobilecultural users?  Manny Miravete didn’t have his Google glasses on hand to tell us the future but did state that “what is now local engagement will become macro.” It will be increasingly important for all businesses to sync their local and national efforts for both social and mobile campaigns. A second important trend for the mobile industry is as Marcus Ellington concretely states that “in the future more businesses will invest future budget in multicultural, mobile and social because they will see it works.”  

Behind every mouse click or swipe is an actual human.  

Cheryl Contee brought it all home with a statement that many advertisers, brands and marketers can agree with which is that “it’s important to remember you have the technology but be smart with how you’re applying that technology to actual human beings.”  The IAB Mobile Marketing Center strongly supports that idea and will continue to facilitate these and other conversations to continue to move the industry in a direction of growth and understanding of technology and the human beings behind them. 

To learn more about events and groups on this topic please visit iab.net/mobile.

About the Author

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Yolanda Brown


Yolanda Brown works with the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB on their various mobile committees, events, and initiatives. She also manages IAB Mobile Center’s ‘Tap Into Mobile’ program which helps businesses small and large optimize their sites for the mobile web. She can be reached on Twitter @YolandaMBrown.  


The Very Visible Consequences of Bad Methodology

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For the record, interactive media are growing and transforming the way people communicate with brands, with content and with each other. What interactive media do not need is badly executed and poorly reported research. The media themselves already resonate with consumers and the marketing ecosystem.

What specific piece of poorly executed research prompted this? On December 13, Forrester released its North American Technographics Report to great fanfare. Much was made of a finding that simply does not synch up with everything we know using other data sources. According to Forrester, consumers reported that they spent 13 hours a week watching TV and 13 hours a week using the internet in January and February of 2010. Fanfare surrounding the purported parity was nearly matched by the furor over the fact that all other data sources show nothing of the kind. For the same time period, comScore reported that people spend 7 hours and 24 minutes a week using the internet.

The IAB does not need to shill for TV so the fact that Nielsen reports that TV viewing levels are in excess of 30 hours per week is not the point. The point is that we, the IAB and the overwhelming majority of members, stand for transparency and consistency in measurement. We sincerely believe that good measurement must be the barometer against which all media are evaluated.

Putting out numbers that confuse the already confused marketplace—numbers that are based on a methodology that every expert would say is inferior for the purposes of measuring media usage—serves no one. Self-reported usage data rely on consumers’ memories and on their desire to disclose what they do with media. Everyone knows that most people are using the internet at work and spending significant time doing so. We all know that being a “couch potato” is not perceived to be as cool as using new media. We know that people watch TV content on digital media. And, we know that most people are not sitting around making many of the distinctions about media that the professionals do. So why would we expect that people can accurately report their media usage using our artificial business distinctions?

A really thorough review of the Forrester study would also require thinking about the sample. Is it representative of broad population groups? Can the findings be generalized beyond the sample? These complexities are beyond the scope of today’s blog.

Planning and buying media for the purposes of marketing to consumers relies on what people do, not on what they say. To those who continue to confuse the marketplace, we say please consider the disservice you do to all of us. To those who accept counterintuitive information, we say caveat emptor.

Sherrill Mane is Senior Vice President for Industry Services at the IAB.

Nielsen & The Measurement Mess: Why We Need a Fix Now

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Last Thursday, we learned that for some time now, Nielsen has been undercounting Internet usage. Nielsen informed clients in a carefully worded message that the company is investigating an erroneous decline in its Internet usage data. The notification went on to say that Nielsen would be working closely with the Media Rating Council (MRC) on remedying the situation. Last week, Ad Age covered the Nielsen story quite clearly.

What is remarkable is that while for approximately eight months Nielsen clients have been alerting Nielsen to the fact that inexplicable, counterintuitive declines in usage have been occurring, the company chose to investigate and communicate findings at its own unacceptably slow pace. When Nielsen did communicate that the data that have been out there for months are wrong, the sophistication and good citizenship shown by working with MRC were appropriate.

All of this begs the question of why doing the right thing happens so very slowly and poorly in today’s ecosystem? More importantly, what can we do to rectify the situation? A voluntary governing body, a FASB (Financial Accounting Standards Board) like MRC with broader empowerment by the entire industry could make a significant difference. For example, an organization like that could have a three month rule, that is, if data appear wrong for three consecutive months across multiple sites, the measurement service producing the data would have to communicate that the numbers are off and explain the steps being taken to rectify the problem.

The latest news from and about Nielsen online measurement just confirms what we at the IAB and our partners at the ANA and the 4A’s already knew: measurement is in dire straits and will stay there unless and until we as a community fix the process. Next time too few people are using the Internet for too little time we should not be looking at almost a year’s worth of bad data and trying to assess the damage.

More on this story from today’s Ad Age »
More on Metrics from the IABlog  |  Previous commentary on Governance in Measurement

Sherrill Mane is Senior Vice President for Industry Services at the IAB.