Results tagged “Mobile” from IABlog

Reaching Dads on Devices: A High Income Segment Prone to Mobile Purchases

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The media industry has paid a great deal of attention to the role of mobile as an important medium for moms. With Father’s Day nearly upon us, IAB’s Mobile Center and Millennial Media thought it was an opportune time to look at the other half of the parenting equation: dads. We examined how dads use mobile and where marketers should seek them out in app and on the mobile web. Our findings (drawn from comScore data) are detailed in the below infographic, and we summarize some highlights here.

There are 52 million mobile dads in the U.S., and they make up 21% of the total U.S. mobile audience. Eighty-two percent of dads own a smartphone, and 40% own a tablet. Dads spend slightly less of their interactive time on mobile than moms do: while moms spend 71% of their total online time on mobile devices, dads spend about 57% of their online time on mobile. This difference is even more pronounced for millennial moms and dads.

So what makes mobile dads an important demographic segment? Spending power for one thing: 58% of mobile dads have a household income over $75,000 per year, which is 33% higher than the mobile average income. That’s because almost three in four mobile dads work full time. And they are willing to spend some of that money via their mobile devices. Thirty-seven percent of all mobile dads make mobile purchases, and that number jumps to 45% of millennial dads. Dads are twice as likely to spend over $500 on mobile purchases compared to the average consumer; and millennial dads are three times more likely. They are not just buying things for themselves: dads are four times more likely to buy things for their families via mobile devices than the average consumer.

Similar to the general population, dads’ most frequently accessed content categories are weather (their number one category for smartphones) and social media (their number one category for tablets). In terms of mobile categories where they outstrip mobile moms, the top content categories are predictable: dads access sports content 28 percentage points more, financial news 23 more, and technology news 19 more than moms do. More surprisingly, dads also access horoscopes, share photos, use shopping apps, and access maps more often than mobile moms. The stereotypical dad may still have trouble asking for directions in the real world, but he is prepared to ask his phone.

Moms get much attention for being heavy mobile users, as they are. But we think that dads deserve greater attention from marketers as well, and not just around Father’s Day. Seeking out these big mobile spenders can help ensure that family-oriented marketing campaigns reach both parental partners, and increase their likelihood of having an impact.

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About the Authors

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 



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Stephen Jenkins

Stephen Jenkins is VP, Global Marketing & Communications, at Millennial Media.

 


 

U.S. Hispanic Millennial Moms Maximize Mobile

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In February 2015, IAB and BabyCenter published 2015 State of Modern Motherhood: Mobile and Media in the Lives of Moms, a look at U.S. millennial moms and the central role that mobile plays in the things they buy and the media they watch. We decided to dive back into the data for another look, this time specifically at Hispanic millennial moms, to compare how their use of mobile and media stacks up against the average millennial mom. Unless otherwise noted, references to “moms” throughout this post refer specifically to U.S. moms in the millennial generation, aged 18-32 years old.

The Hispanic population is one of the most important demographic groups in the United States today. Among moms this is particularly true: 23 percent of all U.S. births are to Hispanic women. So any marketer looking to reach moms needs to understand Hispanic moms, and tailor their message accordingly, or they risk missing almost one in four of their target audience.

The Digital Toolbox is Key for Hispanic Moms
The data clearly indicate just how important digital media are for Hispanic moms looking for parenting related advice or insights. Seventy-one percent of Latina millennial moms whose primary language spoken at home is Spanish (going forward, we’ll call these moms “Spanish-preferred,” and we’ll call Hispanic moms whose primary language spoken at home is English, “English-preferred”) seek expert advice on parenting websites weekly or more often, as compared to 60% of moms in that demo who prefer English, and only 49% of  moms in general. This holds true for an array of other digital media.  Among Spanish-preferred Hispanic moms, 60% turn to mom blogs, 52% turn to other parents on parenting social media, and 45% look to parenting or baby apps, all much higher than the average mom. While the digital world is important for all moms in the coveted millennial age group, it is particularly so for those who are Hispanic.

Even more than PC/laptop-based digital, mobile is the key medium for Latina moms. As the table below shows, PC ownership drops for Hispanic moms relative to moms in general, and indeed, the Spanish-preferred segment is almost equally likely to own a tablet as a laptop/PC. Moreover, 36 percent of Latina moms rely on a mobile device (smartphone or tablet) as their sole internet connection—more than 2.1 times the rate of moms overall. Clearly, even more so than for the average millennial mom, Latina moms are already leading mobile-first, and sometimes even mobile-only, lives.

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Hispanic Mom Media Time Goes Very Mobile
As a mobile-first demographic, it’s unsurprising that Hispanic moms spend even more media time on their mobiles than the average mom does. While millennial moms estimate they spend about 2.8 hours daily online via smartphone or tablet, English-preferred Latina moms in that generation spend 3.2 hours, and those who prefer Spanish spend 4 hours online that way. In fact, the latter group spends 37% of their media time with mobile.

Spanish-preferred Hispanic moms make heavy use of both TV and mobile media, reporting about 11 hours of total daily media time, as compared to 8.9 hours for moms overall.

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Of course, the only way a busy mom could possibly spend that much time with media is through significant multitasking, and Hispanic moms are true experts at that. About 53 percent of this demo always or often use their smartphones while also watching TV, comparable with moms overall. One area where Hispanic moms are distinctive is in watching online video while watching TV. While 33% of moms overall watch online video on their phones while watching TV, the number jumps to 42% with Latinas.

But Hispanic Moms Present Untapped Mobile Shopping Opportunity
While they have definitely embraced mobile media, Hispanic millennial moms do surprisingly little mobile shopping. For example, 51% of moms overall say they use their mobiles in-store to help them search for better prices, as compared to 42% of English-preferred Hispanic moms, and only 39% of those who prefer Spanish.

Similarly, although 62% of moms overall look for and download mobile coupons, only 31% of the Hispanic segment does, and while 44% of U.S. moms search for and read product reviews, and 40% of English-preferred Latina moms do so, and only 27% of those that prefer Spanish use this mobile capability.

We think this is a big untapped opportunity for marketers to influence Latina moms’ shopping habits via mobile. This adoption gap would quickly close if Hispanic millennial moms were more aware of such services and capabilities, and if they were more widely available in Spanish. Marketers should not overlook the opportunity to make this demographic more mobile-shopping savvy.

Digital Advertising is a Great Way To Attract Hispanic Moms’ Attentions
In the “2015 State of Modern Motherhood” report, IAB and BabyCenter observed that millennial moms were much more likely than Gen X moms to say they frequently notice digital and mobile ads. That’s even more true of Hispanic millennial moms. Fifty-six percent of them say they frequently notice digital (laptop/PC, smartphone, or tablet) ads, as compared to 44% of millennial moms overall. And over half (52%) of Hispanic moms frequently notice mobile ads, as compared to only 37% of all moms. That is on par with the percentage of Hispanic moms who said they notice TV ads (50%). Clearly, for marketers reaching this important segment of U.S. moms, mobile is a key media channel.

About the Authors

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 




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Julie Michaelson

Julie Michaelson, Head of Global Sales at BabyCenter.

 


 

When MRAID Met VPAID

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In May of 2014 the IAB published a position paper on the role and evolution of our major creative specifications, VPAID for video, MRAID for mobile rich media, and SafeFrame for friendly iFrames on the web. We observed that the worlds of each of these individual standards, which were created to facilitate distinct kinds of digital ads, were fast converging. As a result, technology vendors and ad designers increasingly found themselves seeking ways to combine their capabilities.
Today, IAB has solved one aspect of this industry challenge by releasing a final version 1.0 of the Video Addendum to MRAID. This new ad specification facilitates creating mobile video interstitial ads that incorporate MRAID-style rich interactivity and also benefit from VPAID’s standardized methods for counting video plays, partial and complete views, and other core metrics.

This is an important step toward helping video ads propagate throughout the mobile internet. MRAID has become a true industry standard for mobile rich media, and now we have standardized a way to run video ads in mobile interstitial rich media placements.

This project presented a number of interesting challenges, as a “container” that runs MRAID ads (that is, the software within a mobile app) plays a somewhat different role than a video player that runs digital video ads. Simply figuring out how to start playing an ad in this hybrid scenario—how the ad should signal that it needs both MRAID and VPAID support, and how the container should respond—took significant time and effort. But we’ve devised a good and practical solution, while keeping implementation as simple as possible. I don’t have space here to acknowledge the many people from rich media companies and video companies alike who tremendously helped make this specification a reality, but they have my sincere thanks for their time and expertise (and their bosses have my thanks, too).

The next step is for vendors that offer MRAID-compliant containers - the mobile rich media community - to evaluate this specification and determine whether and when to build its capabilities into the next version of their products. I expect it will take a little time for addendum-compliant containers to become widespread, but given the importance of mobile video, I’m sure that we’ll see strong adoption. I’m happy that we’ve achieved today’s milestone, and with my fellow IAB Mobile Center and Tech Lab staff, look forward to continuing to extend MRAID’s capabilities and usefulness in the always-changing mobile world.

About the Author

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 


 

IAB Releases Mobile Programmatic Playbook

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We’re at an inflection point where programmatic advertising is becoming more sophisticated with the buy and sell side applying their power to a broader, more diverse set of opportunities. The benefits of programmatic across the digital spectrum are clear. With mobile an increasingly important part of the consumer’s daily life, reaching on the go consumers via this 24/7 channel is a top priority for marketers, just as learning how to fully monetize their mobile applications and mobile websites is a key goal for publishers. 

Given the growth of mobile advertising over the past year it’s clear that programmatic can be a major contributor to almost all aspects of mobile campaign success due to the combination of decision making intelligence and speed across the programmatic value chain. Brand marketers are leveraging programmatic channels to achieve the massive scale they need for their awareness campaigns, and advertisers now have access to numerous rich media, video and native mobile ad formats which excel at capturing the consumer’s attention.

There are many positive trends emerging among buyers and sellers. Both parties value native, rich media and video ad formats all of which provide better experiences to the consumer. However, in the mobile ecosystem where cookies are less prevalent, a key point to note is that programmatic buying requires greater transparency in terms of mobile data signals to enable publishers to more effectively optimize their yield and brands to achieve greater ROI. 

As the co-chair of the IAB’s Mobile Programmatic Buying Working group I am incredibly excited for us to officially release the IAB Mobile Programmatic Playbook today. This playbook is the first IAB programmatic document that covers all aspects that are unique to the mobile programmatic environment so that publishers, third parties, advertisers, agencies and marketers have a guide to learning more about the current state and evolution of the mobile programmatic market when planning their strategies. 

In addition, as further evidence that mobile programmatic is making waves, it will be one of the main subjects discussed at the IAB Mobile Marketplace conference on March 30th in New York.


About the Author
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Rob Kramer

Rob Kramer is General Manager of Mobile at OpenX



 

Unleashing Mobile Native's Potential in 2015

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Gartner’s recent predictions for the growth of mobile commerce over the next 24 months should come as no surprise - mobile commerce revenue is expected to more than double over the next two years ultimately accounting for 1 out of every 2 dollars spent in digital commerce.  

As consumer spending habits shift sharply to mobile, so too are advertising budgets with the rapid growth in mobile advertising today reminiscent of the same trajectory we witnessed in display advertising after the RTB protocol was introduced seven years ago. Put simply: mobile (and mobile native) advertising represents an opportunity that is about to fast eclipse that of display.

The challenge for those seeking to capitalize on the perfect storm of powerful data-based insights for targeting mobile consumers and rapidly accelerating spend on mobile will be to develop marketing strategies that unlock the full potential of mobile consumer engagement. This opportunity has highlighted the clear and immediate need for uniform industry standards to help unlock the full potential of mobile and mobile native advertising—for both the advertiser as well as for the publishers and application developers.  

The lack of standardization is probably the number one reason that buyers and sellers are unable to connect effectively when it comes to mobile native advertising and this creates a huge amount of friction. 

The second reason is the inefficiency with direct ad buying in mobile. Advertisers can go directly to an app developer and buy inventory on a single app or across a family of apps, but this is time intensive. In order to reach the scale advertisers now demand for their campaign objectives, they would need to make dozens, if not hundreds of deals with separate publishers and app developers located around the world. This is simply not a viable option for large scale consumer campaigns. And to makes matter worse for direct advertisers, many large and successful app developers don’t operate large sales teams (or sales teams at all!) making it nearly impossible for advertisers to secure inventory directly on many successful apps. 

Thirdly, relying on mobile ad networks - while streamlining the process for the advertiser - has led to crippling and unintended consequences for publishers and app developers. With each ad network integration the app developer is required to insert a unique ad network code - a Software Development Kit (SDK). As more and more SDKs are inserted, rendering quality of the app is negatively impacted.  In speaking with many app developers I have heard time and again that the integration of these SDKs has been identified as the #1 cause for application crashes, consequentially proving a poor user experience which drives down usage, stickiness, and ultimately depresses potential monetization.  

The good news for both buyers and sellers is that the industry has been focused on addressing these issues and just completed an 8-month review process to develop a  common, programmatic language to drive efficiency in mobile native advertising. This extension to the OpenRTB offers advertisers a better way to access millions of applications and will help establish integration processes that will complement the user experience. 

The IAB’s publication of this standards-track specification signals a game-changing advancement for the advertising industry with benefits seen across the entire ecosystem, including:

  1. A new and better revenue stream for app developers. Currently, app developers make the majority of their revenue through paid downloads. By standardizing the mobile native transaction process, a previously unavailable revenue stream will be delivered to the market fueled by allowing developers to make money from engaging and lucrative native ads appearing within their apps.  
  2. Increased supply of premium mobile native inventory. With the new potential for revenue, more app developers will enter the market and existing app developers will now make their inventory available more easily to advertisers. The core “network” effects of advertising technology - more sellers attracting more buyers - will be further unleashed. 
  3. Acceleration of scale within mobile native. By standardizing mobile native advertising, brand advertisers and agencies will now have access to larger amount of inventory making it easier for them to achieve their campaign objectives. 
  4. Improved user experience. By standardizing the process and removing the need for multiple SDK integrations, mobile apps will render more quickly and will be less likely to crash, thus delivering an optimal user experience.

The adoption of a standard means of buying and selling mobile native ad placements is a win for publishers and developers seeking greater avenues for monetization, and will create better, more varied ad experiences for mobile users. Enabling brands with deeper opportunities to reach and engage key audiences will be crucial in mobile advertising’s continued growth. 

About the Authors

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Neal Richter

Neal Richter is the Chief Scientist of Rubicon Project and co-chair of OpenRTB



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Brendan Riordan-Butterworth

Brendan Riordan-Butterworth is the Director of Technical Standards at IAB.





 
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The International Breakfast Session, which was started a few years ago, has now become a key discussion during the IAB Annual Leadership Meeting. Taking place on the closing day of the conference in Phoenix, Arizona, the session gathered over 50 digital advertising leaders from 11 countries to discuss the pressing issues facing the industry and how we can work better together to advance our common interests. 

Two very lively conversations were the focus of the morning, in addition to the newly released research in partnership with BabyCenter and the IAB multinational research: The first was an open International Town Hall on mobile integration, and the second was a chat on Viewability

“Everything is mobile,” explains Guy Phillipson, CEO, IAB UK, “and we are clearly in a period of global mobile exponential growth.” Although the UK now sees mobile dominates digital time, many other countries are not far behind, from a shift in consumer behavior to one in digital ad spending. As such, it is not surprising that global media owners are considering cross screen strategies to be vital even though monetization remains a key challenge. 

The challenges publishers are faced with are not necessarily country specific. Issues such as access to subscription data, tracking consumers on mobile devices, targeting and frequency capping are real problems in many markets. Certainly, regions like Southeast Asia face additional hurdles compared to Europe as the diversity from country to country is remarkable and although mobile is at the heart of what IAB Singapore has to offer, lobbying for standards and setting policy is primordial.

It also came to light in this discussion that as IABs around the world address mobile integration, it does not always make sense to have mobile broached separately from the rest of the digital landscape. The same is true with digital video, which is becoming increasingly important, as is the need for content and advertising to be constructed in a different ways (ie shorter). It was also interesting to hear how even the definition of mobile isn’t always as clear-cut as one would expect. IAB Canada, Vice President, Operations, Julie Ford, suggested separating smartphones from everything else maybe a better approach.
 
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As Randall Rothenberg, President and CEO, IAB, points out, maybe we are seeing a return of interruptive advertising because of mobile. Where it used to be one of the worse kinds of advertising, cluttering the screen, the remarkable success of mobile is that it puts ads in the middle of the content. Native or in-stream advertising in mobile can in essence be compared to television ads or even magazine ads.  

There was a solid agreement from everyone present on the need to better understand the multi-screen evolution, what meets consumers’ needs and what works for advertisers. And clearly the need for research in terms of screen sizes and their impact as that is an important part of creating effective advertising. From IAB Canada’s html5 webinar series to the work IAB is doing this year on establishing new responsive standards, it is evident that the key is to get agencies and advertisers on board by understanding the impact of mobile advertising and not just looking at mobile from a technology standpoint.

The chat on Viewability was equally vibrant. 

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Lou Paskalis, SVP, Enterprise Media Executive, Bank of America, and Julian Zilberbrand, EVP, Activation Standards, Insights & Technology, ZenithOptimedia, were joined by Sherrill Mane, Senior Vice President, Research, Analytics, and Measurement, IAB, and actively engaged everyone in the breakfast on what planning and trading on a viewable metrics means and how we as a global industry are not ready for this yet, until the issue measurement has been tackled. 

Again, not limited to the U.S. market, there are fraudulent actors in the digital advertising ecosphere and it is completely understandabl
e that advertisers do not want to be paying to send a message out to consumers that is never seen. As Julian pointed out, that would just be a waste. What it comes down to is the opportunity to have consumers receive the message and for it to be viewed. Sherrill underlined that Viewability is important for everyone’s KPIs, and it is more than planning and buying media, it is knowing the value so that you can build models based on more than air.

From all corners of the world, there is a lot of noise out there about Viewability but until there is clarity and agreement on measurement, we are functionally in a period where the focus needs to be on tracking. Conducting business on viewable impressions does not make sense today. Most publishers don’t have systems in place to manage Viewablity and as Julian pointed out so well, this is the year they need to push technology partners for a solution. And tying in to our earlier conversation about mobile, Lou pointed out that not only does the counting process need to be addressed overall but given that mobile is at the center of what so many are doing now, mobile Viewability aught to be fast-tracked. 
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If you would like to get engaged with the IAB Global Network, be sure to save the date for the next significant event, IAB Global Summit, to be held in New York on September 30 and October 1, 2015. In the meantime, you can learn more at www.iab.net/global and browse the full IAB Global Network Facebook photo album here.


About the Author

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Alexandra Salomon

Alexandra Salomon is the Senior Director, International at the Interactive Advertising Bureau


 

Closing the Loop with Location Data

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In this age of digital media, technology and data are changing rapidly as data signal continues to explode. Each new data brings the possibility of new measurement solutions and new methodological approaches that allow us to better understand the consumer path to purchase and overall campaign effectiveness. 

If you think about it, measuring clicks and click-through rates (CTR) in digital channels has long been an industry standard of evaluating campaign effectiveness and used in modeling campaign attribution. However, research shows that clicks on online display ads are often not correlated with brand awareness or purchase intent, and using clicks in mobile as brand interest can be even more of an issue. Since clicks are not good indicators of consumer brand awareness or purchase intent, we can look to the growth in marketing data to help us find alternatives.

Mobility data (data from tablets, smartphones, IoT, wearables) is a perfect example of new data that improves our ability to measure advertising. As the consumption of digital media continues to move to devices which can provide mobility data, the arsenal of physical signal of user behaviors explodes. One of the pieces of mobility data which has proven to be most valuable to marketers is location data. Cross-channel location data is essential for enhancing our ability to measure the effectiveness of advertising by actually allowing us to measure the effect of online to offline on a broad scale and not just for those users who we have been able to track through qualitative surveys and diaries.

Passive location data, specifically lat/long, is a by-product of opt-in user brand app usage, check-ins, photo tagging, social posts and more. Location data can be used to move beyond geo-fencing and targeting users based on geography to providing a signal for mobile based audience models and in-store measurement. The key to location-based metrics is to tie location to other attributes: brick and mortar brands, events, behavioral propensities or any other audience signal that can be associated to a geographical area.  

The magic of location data is the power of its signal when it is accurate and associated with other relevant metadata. Once location is in context, we can connect digital campaign information to the corresponding audience interaction in the physical world to achieve that dream of measuring the effect of online brand interactions to offline sales as we know online channels have increasing influence on offline sales (see the chart below).  
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Location data also enables us to better understand attribution and campaign performance across channels (desktop, tablet, smartphone, TV, OOH, etc.).  

By identifying location data and subsequently analyzing the physical patterns of the audiences targeted on various channels, you can go beyond click-through to measure what matters - the impact your cross-channel campaign has on in-store traffic and purchases. And now for the best part, I’m extremely excited for the release of an important project many companies, colleagues, and myself have been working on in collaboration with the IAB. Today we are releasing a primer on how location data is used to better understand ROI and attribution. This piece highlights current and emerging practices for using mobile location data in numerous ways to better understand campaign and marketing performance. You can download the primer, “Marketing ROI and Location Data” here


About the Author

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Lauren Moores

Lauren Moores is the VP of Analytics at Dstillery



 
For a simple question, “what is mobile?” can be surprisingly difficult. Most of the time when we’re asked, my IAB Mobile Center colleagues and I tend to talk about mobile as a social shift, a major change in the way people live their lives, keep up with friends, and stay informed and entertained. All of that is true, and should define media company and marketer strategies. But social shifts don’t necessarily make for straightforward revenue accounting practices, and so the IAB CFO Council and the Mobile Center collaborated on a brief survey of ad seller IAB members, asking them what they counted as “mobile” from a revenue perspective.

We’ve just released the results, in our 2014 IAB Mobile Revenue Recognition Survey. In terms of answering the question at hand, smartphone ad revenue is almost always mobile (93% of respondents), and tablet ad revenue is are generally considered mobile too (by 78% of respondents). Only 16% think of laptop ads as generating mobile revenue. Revenue from apps is almost universally considered mobile, while revenue from websites viewed on phones or tablets is much less so.

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IAB believes that surveys like this one provide useful guidance to the industry, indicating emerging best practices and de facto standards that all ad sellers should consider when revamping their accounting systems to reflect the modern, cross-screen world.


About the Author

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 


 

Forging the path to Data Demystification

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Data had a landmark year in 2014. This year we saw everyone get interested in data. Brands, agencies, publishers, automakers, consumers, legislators and even the Supreme Court was fixated on issues surrounding digital data. Most of these issues centered on the data captured, stored and shared by our mobile phones. 

As the device that goes everywhere with us throughout the day, the industry is now just starting to realize the immense data opportunities created by Mobile. On the revenue side, Mobile continued its unhindered ascension to digital dominance. The IAB half-year ad revenue numbers showed Mobile revenues increased 71% in 1H14 capturing 24% of total internet revenues or a total of $2.8B in ad spend.  

With this continued monumental shift to Mobile comes an ever-growing list of terms, acronyms and the confusion that accompanies any nascent industry. We at the IAB are no strangers to helping supply the tools to enable nascent markets to grow. Our Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence was started four years ago with the sole purpose of growing Mobile budgets and today we have taken another leap towards facilitating that goal. 

I’m excited to announce the release of the IAB’s Mobile Data Primer - a companion document to our updated Data Primer released in 2013. This Mobile Data Primer marks an important step in helping us coalesce, as an industry, around the data opportunities, classifications and use cases available in the Mobile Advertising Market. It also provides important Mobile data best practices and an updated code of conduct. 

Beyond providing clarity and transparency, our aim is for this primer to be used as a foundation that will enable deeper conversations around the Mobile data opportunity in the coming year. Now that we have a common knowledge base, we can explore more sophisticated use cases and can leverage Mobile data as part of an overall marketing automation strategy to inform better messaging and creative, and foster deeper consumer relationships. 

I would like to thank the IAB’s Data Council for their continued work to help truly demystify data for the digital industry, and also for their leadership in the creation of this primer. We are excited to continue these conversations as data maintains center stage in the coming years. 


About the Author

headshot.jpgBelinda J. Smith

Belinda J. Smith is Senior Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the Interactive Advertising Bureau



 

Who are Mobile Gamers and Why Do They Matter?

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Mobile Gaming apps are the most popularly used mobile app type, according to the recently released IAB study “Mobile Gamers: Who They Are, How They Shop, and How to Reach Them” which is based on an IAB analysis of Prosper Insights data and represents the self-reported media behaviors of about 15,000 US adults 18 and older (A18+). Not only is Mobile Gaming the number one app type, but Mobile Gamers represent a substantial 37% of the US adult population. 
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Who are Mobile Gamers and why should marketers and digital publishers care? Mobile gamers are likely to be women (56% vs. 51%A18+), professionals (35% vs. 28%), higher earners ($68k vs. $62k) and purchase influencers (40% vs. 32%). They earn more, they spend more and they’re more likely than the general population to be planning both major and minor purchases. A full 16% are planning to buy an auto (vs. 12% A18+). Female mobile gamers are more likely to be planning a vacation (25% vs. 18%A18+) while male mobile gamers are more likely to be shopping for a new mobile device (17% vs. 10% A18+). This is a desirable audience.

But perhaps most important to digital publishers, Mobile Gamers are heavy mobile media users who can also be reached on digital media via their mobile devices. While male Mobile Gamers tend to be heavy gamers (74% play videogames during the week), female Mobile Gamers’ video gaming habits are more reflective of the general population (49% game during the week vs. 44% of A18+). Female Mobile Gamers are casual gamers and they spend their time online, taking in all forms of media on their computers and smartphones.

As heavy digital and mobile users, Mobile Gamers’ purchases are much more influenced by various forms of digital and mobile media than the general adult population, providing ample opportunities to reach them using these ad formats. Not only is this desirable audience more likely to watch online video (73% vs. 56% A18+) and mobile video (65% vs 41%A18+) but they’re also more likely to watch the video ads (62% vs 34%A18+) and even say that their Electronics (18% vs. 13%A18+) and Clothing (12% vs. 8%A18+) purchases are influenced by mobile video.  

Being digitally savvy and mobile focused, 94% of Mobile Gamers regularly research products online (vs. 89% A18+) and on their mobile devices before buying. Interestingly, the products they’re most likely to research (Electronics and Clothing) are also the ones that digital advertising is most likely to persuade them in, presenting an ideal environment to serve such ads. Internet ads and Email ads have more influence on them than Cable TV and nearly as much influence as Broadcast TV. One in three Mobile Gamers say their Electronics purchases are influenced by Internet Ads (vs. 24% A18+) or Email Ads (vs. 25% A18+). Female Mobile Gamers are heavier Social Media users and 23% admit that their clothing purchases are influenced by Social Media (vs. 13% A18+). Thus, ads served to them while researching products, whether online or in the store on their phones, will likely be rewarded.  

Mobile Gamers are more likely to own a smartphone (52%) than a desktop computer (45%) and they regularly showroom. They’re also much more likely than the general US adult population to make purchases using their mobile devices. While Mobile Gamers ‘showroom’ regularly, consisting mostly of reading product reviews and price checking, they most often end up buying the product in person at the store or at a competitor’s store. Interestingly, Mobile Gamers are more likely to both check email on their smartphones (90% vs 62%A18+) and to be influenced by email ads, providing another opportunity to reach them in store. Since they’re reachable on the go via mobile while in the stores, targeted ads, offers or email coupons during their shopping experience would likely sway their purchases. After they’ve left the store, many Mobile Gamers will buy the product online, offering a second chance for advertisers to reach them through digital media.

In summary, Mobile Gamers are a desirable audience that is planning to spend and they shop armed with a smartphone. As heavy mobile users, they are reachable online and are always connected. Their overall media consumption profile implies that a sequenced media mix to these Mobile Gamers could be effective. An ad on a mobile video game, followed by a targeted ad online while they’re researching the product, then followed up with an email offer or targeted in-store offer (for those who are reached by beacons) to catch them while they’re showrooming could win Mobile Gamers’ dollars. Digital and mobile ads are likely to influence Mobile Gamers’ purchases so intercepting their online activities with ads and offers is likely to pay off. A savvy marketing mix that makes good use of the variety of digital formats and mobile technologies could transform Angry Birds into Happy Marketers and Words With Friends to Advertisers With ROI.


About the Author

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Kristina Sruoginis

Kristina Sruoginis is the Research Director at IAB.


 

From the Winter Olympics to a fantastic World Cup, it’s already been a great year for sports around the world. And as the summer baseball season unfolds in the US, the IAB Mobile Center and InMobi have collaborated to publish a look at how US consumers use their smartphones to plan and purchase tickets to sporting events.

This report completes a trilogy of studies examining mobile and ticketing. Previously we looked at mobile and movies and mobile and live theater and music performances. Like those event categories, sports benefits greatly from the ease and convenience of the mobile internet.

Among the key findings from the sports research:

  • 85% of mobile sports fans turn to mobile after seeing ads for entertainment events on other channels. 
  • 49% of mobile sports fans say they find information about entertainment activities via mobile, making that channel more important than PC and print for entertainment information.
  • 78% of mobile sports fans use their mobiles to help plan trips to watch live sporting events.
  • Sports fans use their devices during games to record videos and watch replays.
  • 1 out of 3 mobile sports fans purchases game tickets directly through their phones or tablets. Box office, online and mobile are now all major sources of ticket sales. 

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Like mobile consumers generally, mobile sports fans gravitate toward ads that combine fun and relevance. Sports marketers seeking to make mobile an MVP on their media team should remember that 36% of this group prefer ads that showcase video, sound, and photos; 33% like deals or other promotions; 28% like pre-sale ticket opportunities; and 27% like ads that feature their favorite sports team.

It’s hard to imagine a category of marketer that’s a more natural fit for mobile than entertainment ticketing. Whether it’s a spontaneous movie night, the game of the year, or the concert of a lifetime, mobile has the immediacy and relevance to help a fan learn what’s going on, act on that, and share the experience with friends and the world. We hope these three studies help open marketers’ eyes to the value that mobile brings to the world of event ticketing, and look forward to seeing even tighter and better integration of mobile into sports, music, theater, event, and movie marketing.


About the Author

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 



 

Make Mobile Work continues with Design with Device in Mind

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On Tuesday, May 13th IAB’s Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence hosted our second Make Mobile Work webinar of the four-part series. Devoted to cross-screen creative and “Designing with Device in Mind” we had a great discussion with insights from Xaxis, Doubleclick and Tremor Video. View the full webinar, download the slides and sign up for future webinars here.

As we continue our call to help marketers navigate mobile and cross-screen opportunities - we’ve invited Time, Inc. to share some additional studies of brands successfully connecting with their always-on, device-agnostic, digital consumers. Additionally, be sure to check out the Mobile Center’s new launched creative and case study showcases page where you can see examples of HTML5 mobile and tablet creative as well as cross-screen case studies from our members.

The Driven Campaign 
A Time Inc. Digital Experience 
Coming from a publisher’s point of view there are several important factors when addressing cross-screen capabilities for our sites and ad campaigns.  With upwards of 50% of our digital audience visiting us from mobile devices, and growing, it makes cross-screen strategies an imperative from both the user experience and business operations point of view. Today Time Inc. has 21 Tablet Magazines, 25 Mobile & Tablet Apps, and 19 Mobile Websites  ̶  many of which are going through responsive design reboots. 

For this post I’m going to focus on a specific campaign we created for Land Rover that was powered by our Watercooler LIVE content marketing platform. The platform comprises several unique products and capabilities that come together like Voltron to help marketers win the battle for attention and engage with audiences across devices.  

In the demos below you can see the Land Rover - “Driven” campaign as it renders for users across multiple environments. Time Inc. curated the “Driven” campaign content from paid, owned, and earned media channels into a responsive site that was iFramed into landroverusa.com/driven. We also put a re-direct on that domain pointing to a standalone site for users coming from mobile devices in order to ensure an ideal user experience for every device.  

This is how visits were divided by screen:
  • 66% Desktop
  • 12% Tablet
  • 20% Smart Phone
The HTML5 responsive site worked seamlessly across screens and was also engineered to provide dynamic content to its accompanying Time Amplify ad units. All of our products are designed to increase both reach and engagement by allowing advertisers to take context (Time Inc. content) to go.  Through our data assets and platform connections, we were able to run these units both on and off of the Time Inc. network, finding our audience at the right place, at the right time, and on the right device. As part of this campaign, we also created a custom unit to roadblock sponsored editorial content and provide users with another opportunity to engage with the “Driven” campaign as a 100% opt-in experience. The video below showcases the Time Amplify units that dynamically pair Sports Illustrated content to the “Driven” campaign elements. 
Using MOAT analytics to measure in-view and interaction across all screens, we delivered the equivalent of over 10 years of measured in-view time across desktop, mobile and tablet in a two-month period. As you can see, the “Driven” campaign really benefited from us taking device into consideration from the outset. The campaign garnered an average engagement rate north of 7% and Average Time Spent across all elements of the campaign of nearly a minute. Great results across the board.

Here are a few tips for marketers wondering where to get started for a winning cross-screen strategy of their own. Developing for cross-screen has never been easier:
  • Start with the basics - Campaign objectives, creative brief, brand guidelines
  • Tailor your objectives to fit each screen—While you can leverage desktop assets across screens you should be mindful of screen size, bandwidth, and device-specific user behavior
  • Leverage platforms and tools to develop/experiment in faster cycles
  • Chart your users’ journey and create meaningful touch points using the screen and technology that’s most appropriate
  • Measure the metrics that matter for each screen and look at campaign results both holistically and in detail A/B test, measure, analyze, improve, and repeat
  • Always identify what could be done better and incorporate that learning into the next campaign

At Time Inc., we strive to leverage large, impactful, flexible, and standardized canvases — including the IAB rising stars — by painting them with dynamic, content-driven ad experiences that feel authentic to consumers and drive engagement and results for marketers. Make sure your partners are equally committed to approaching cross-screen in a way that resonates with your customers. 


About the Authors


headshot.jpgBelinda J. Smith

Belinda J. Smith is Senior Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the Interactive Advertising Bureau



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Sam Mansour

Sam Mansour is Director of Digital Ad Product Experience at Time Inc


 
The IAB’s standardized interfaces for rich ads—Video Suite (VAST, VPAID and VMAP), MRAID, and SafeFrame—are among our most important contributions to enabling engaging, dynamic advertising to scale.  In three different ad environments, these technical specifications standardize communication between the ad creative and the systems that host the content. In a video player, the player must be able to understand and process the ad’s requests to operate smoothly (VPAID). For mobile in-app ads, the mobile app must be programmed to recognize the ad’s requests (MRAID). In a webpage where the ad runs in an iframe, a line of communication is needed between the page and the iframe (SafeFrame).

The three specifications IAB and our members have developed to standardize these communications have significantly reduced the friction associated with buying and selling advertising in web, mobile, and video environments. 

However, there’s a challenge.  Each of the three IAB specs was designed for a distinct scenario, and we live in a world where those scenarios are increasingly blurring together.  Companies are increasingly dealing with the convergence of these standards, asking questions like: 

  • How can VPAID and MRAID best be used together? 
  • While MRAID was developed for in-app experiences, what about browser-based apps? 
  • Should SafeFrame be the sole solution for browser-based experiences?

To formulate a game plan for addressing this convergence, IAB assembled leaders from each of the three standards efforts, along with relevant IAB staff, to publish a perspective on the challenges of bringing these standards into harmony with one another.  This document includes an overview of the specifications, the challenges we’re hearing about from the industry, and an overview of next steps IAB intends to take.  Over the long-term, there’s no question that we should place VPAID, SafeFrame, and MRAID on a convergence path.  But that’s necessarily going to be a lengthy process.  

In the short and medium term, we are talking with industry representatives about how to formulate best practices for working effectively with these specs, notably combining VPAID and MRAID, and other best practices as industry need warrants.  We encourage interested members to get involved as we make sure MRAID, VPAID, and SafeFrame stay relevant and valuable in a rapidly evolving—and converging—digital advertising world. 


About the Author

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 


 

Digital Video In-Stream Metrics Released!

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If you are familiar with the story of the Tower of Babel, you’re aware of the potential power behind a commonly understood language. When everyone accepts definitions in the same way, the chance of confusion is eliminated and time can be spent more efficiently in progressing forward rather than having to consistently translate various interpretations. Digital Video In-Stream Metrics serve this exact purpose for buyers and sellers of digital video in-stream advertising, and have played an important role in maturing the industry and supporting its evolution. 

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Digital video is a fast moving marketing channel undergoing a large amount of innovation and technical functionality, so the industry will need to periodically review and revise standards to reflect the needs of current practice. The last update to the metrics was in 2008, so IAB convened a working group to modernize the metrics but we found during comment periods that there were some prevailing questions that we chose to address outside of the document. 

We hosted the webinar, Digital Video Metrics Modernized to provide an overview of the document and addressed those questions, and as an added layer of clarity we have outlined them in an FAQ. Ultimately, our goal is to enable growth in the industry. We do this by building and maintaining consensus around the use of these metrics and concepts so that buyers understand sellers and transparency is established.


FAQ Digital Video In-Stream Metric Definitions 

Why not combine the metric definitions with the Impression Measurement Guidelines?

IAB Impression Measurement Guidelines, which have been developed for display, mobile and digital video, describe technical details for how an ad impression should be counted in each of the specified contexts. Each of the Impression Measurement Guidelines documents is used in the industry to establish sound measurement practices for ad impressions. 

In contrast, the Digital Video In-Stream Metric Definition document, simply describe a baseline of interactive metrics that companies can voluntarily track in digital video. No technical guidelines are imposed for how each metric is measured, allowing companies make the best use of their technology while offering the Industry a common definition for select interactive digital video metrics.

Why isn’t viewability covered in the update to metric definitions for digital in-stream video?

Viewability in digital video is a more complex issue than simply defining a term. The 2014 Digital In-Stream Video Metric Definitions only defines a baseline set of interactive metrics that the industry can use as a common lexicon. However, establishing common measurement practices for determining whether an ad is in view requires a process that identifies and addresses technical and operational challenges. The Make Measurements Make Sense (3MS) initiative is leading the efforts toward more effective impression measurements. As a standard becomes adopted in the industry, these metric definitions may be updated to reflect relevant changes.

We serve video ads into 300x250 placements on websites. Why is this being excluded from the definition for digital video in-stream video ads?

The format of an ad does not make it a digital video in-stream video ad; the context into which the ad is served defines digital in-stream video ads. The technology for receiving and executing ads is different and requires different resources when the ad is served into a webpage and when served into a video player. Video ads that are served into a webpage are commonly known as in-banner video ads and are executed by the browser. Separately, ads served into a player are received and executed by the player—each of which may be built using proprietary code. Therefore, only ads served to a player (video or otherwise), constitute a digital in-stream video ad.

What constitutes a “player?”

In the context of digital in-stream video, a player is a browser-based computer program that executes videos, animation, or games that streams publisher content.

One advertising strategy we use is to stream short clips of content along with ads into a display placement on a publisher’s webpage. Our ads are played before, during, or after the content we serve, and they’re served into a player. Are our ads considered digital in-stream video ads?

If the content being streamed belongs to the same publisher that also owns the webpage content into which you are serving the clips and ads, then yes. For example, a news publisher may post several short news clips in the sidebar of their page. Ads served into these news clips are considered digital in-stream video ads.

However, if the content belongs to publishers other than the one who owns the page content, and especially if that content is served to a display ad placement on the page, the content is a form of advertising. In this case, the content, as well as the ads served with it, are being served to the webpage and classified as in-page, or in-banner video ads.

Is mobile covered in this metric definition update?

Ads served into browser-based players that stream publisher content are considered digital in-stream ads, regardless of the device in which they play. However, mobile devices present some challenges to tracking ad interactions. Native players in mobile devices are capable of playing content while offline and therefore lack the persistent connection required for communicating ad interactions in real time. For now, the 2014 Digital In-Stream Video Metric Definitions are restricted to the context of live streaming content. However, to the extent possible, these metric definitions may be applied to native digital players in mobile.

Are the ads we serve into games considered digital in-stream video ads?

Yes, game publishers may sell ad inventory that is served into their browser-based game players. Ads served into these players are considered digital in-stream video ads.


About the Author
Jessica Anderson
Jessica Anderson is Senior Manager of Advertising Technology at IAB. 





 
There is no doubt that mobile gaming is a hot topic that is attracting the notice of brand advertisers. Mobile gaming is growing significantly due to three key trends:
  1. Growth in smartphone and tablet usage (according to the IAB Mobile Center research, as of January 2014, 57% of all US adults owned a smartphone and 44% owned a tablet)
  2. Increasing sophistication in mobile app ecosystem
  3. Growing willingness among consumers to pay for virtual goods and accept mobile advertising
Mobile game monetization comes from:
  1. Virtual goods
  2. Paid apps and downloads
  3. Advertising
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Per eMarketer, mobile game monetization is projected to increase significantly over the next four years. All three of the primary monetization models—downloads, in-game/virtual goods, and ad-supported—will grow, but the mix will shift in favor of in-game/virtual goods.
 
For these reasons, the IAB Games and Mobile Committees convened a Town Hall discussion titled “The Future of Mobile Game Advertising.” Susan Borst, Director of Industry Initiatives and the IAB lead for the Games Committee stated that interest in game advertising has never been higher and bringing these two committees together is important given that nearly a third of all time spent on mobile is on games. Joe Lazlo, Senior Director of the IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence added that successful game advertising has much to teach the rest of the mobile ecosystem.

Following a welcome and some perspective on the state of mobile games advertising from event host, Jeff Colen, Ad Sales & Marketing at Zynga, Lewis Ward, Research Director of Gaming at IDC, shared some background information on smartphone growth and share, consumer spending on games and consumer sentiment for game play by device.
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Lewis noted the growth of the tablet for game play, and in particular the iPad as gamer’s favorite iOS devices. He went on to say that significant demographic differences exist across the various mobile platforms, notably HH income and gender, which have obvious implications for game developers and advertisers. For instance, the IDC study showed a big disposable income gap between iOS and Android, and game play on Kindle Fire skews heavily female.

Defining and sizing smartphone and tablet ads is “tricky due to technology fragmentation and the rapid pace of market innovation and evolution,” said Lewis, and the audience agreed. This is an area where the IAB could work to provide some clarity. 


Source: IDC
PANEL DISCUSSION
The key takeaway from the Town Hall discussion is that there has been a significant and important shift in just the past year or so and the momentum is building.  
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Key Highlights:

  1. Ad format evolution taking place: From advertising that offers player rewards, value exchange video advertising, rich media creative, branded content and more native integration—ads on games are becoming less aggravating—and more frictionless. 
    • There is an overall increased acceptance of advertising among users when advertising is executed in a way that brings value to their experience, is contextually relevant, delivered in a format that is visually appealing or synergistic to their mobile experience. Benjani highlighted inMobi’s focus on “working with studios and brands to create deeply integrated native ad experiences to connect advertisers to audiences globally.”
    • Emotional targeting that is additive to game play (creating value exchange between advertiser and user) tapping into players’ emotions and serving ads in the right place at the right time with the right message is a win for both advertisers and consumers. This allows the brand to be a welcome “hero” for the player, taking part in the user experience and offering players rewards during moments of “achievement” or tips at points of “frustration.” 
    • “In-game advertising is the only way brand marketers can reach and reward, encourage and rescue players in a way that adds value to the user experience. For example, during Breakthrough Moments™ (BTMs™), brands can reach game players during moments of “achievement,” such as when they get a new high score or a longest jump. With this approach, people will reciprocate the brand’s gift and take a post ad action—such as purchase a product or visit a website—and further engage with the brand, giving marketers a unique way to make lasting, meaningful connections with people,” said Brandt.
  1. Increasing focus on brand metrics: As Lewis noted, CPM, CPC, CPA and CPV all have some traction in mobile games, but increasingly, better brand metrics, analytics and real-time decisioning are changing the way effectiveness is measured. “Keep in mind as to where your ads are running as not all impressions are equal. If your primary KPI is to deliver a positive brand experience and association, look at where the ad is running and ask if you were playing this game - would you feel interrupted by or helped by this advertisement? User experience is at the paramount of successfully advertising on mobile and simply porting over outdated ad units and placements from display advertising is not enough. These are personal experiences on mobile and the key is tailor advertising to match this new medium”, said O’Connor.
  2. More options for developers and advertisers: From in-app to HTML5, more options are emerging for game developers and advertisers to foster “native” experiences. Grossberg added: “Brands are also beginning to leverage HTML5 to create their own mobile web games (the game is the advertising!) to engage their target audience at scale through this preferred activity on mobile, and do so in a cost effective manner in a way that fosters social and viral growth.”
Mobile game integration is a reality and has become industry standard for marketers.  The IAB Games Committee is  finalizing a white paper titled “The Games Advertising Ecosystem” report which is intended to help the industry understand today’s game play, the core game types and advertising categories for marketers to reach consumers.  Stay tuned!

About the Author

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Kym Nelson

Kym Nelson serves as an IAB Games Committee Co-Chair and is Senior Vice President of Sales at Twitch TV, the world’s largest live-streaming video platform. In this role since May, 2013, she has created Twitch Media Group, launching an inside, direct-sales media group at Twitch. She is responsible for creating and leading a world-class sales organization that delivers completely new and innovative digital solutions on a platform that is spearheading digital media as we know it today. 

 

IAB Standards Reach Japan

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As we hear of increased demand for IAB or IAB-like standards, guidelines and best practices in countries where IAB does not yet have a local IAB operation, we are intentionally seeking ways to engage in meaningful discussions and collaborate on specific initiatives in strategic markets like Japan.  
 
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IAB has been working in close collaboration with D.A. Consortium in Japan for nearly a year. As strong advocates for IAB standards and guidelines, DAC announced its launch of IAB Mobile Rising Stars in Japan and conducted research into their effectiveness in that marketplace. DAC has also translated and published on their subsidiary PlatformOne in Japan the IAB whitepaper “Programmatic and Automation: The Publisher’s Perspective”, part of IAB Digital Simplified Series.
 
Continuing this trend, the DAC team just recently they published a translation of the IAB whitepaper “Privacy and Tracking in a Post-Cookie World”. Click here to view the Japanese version or here for the original English version.

About the Author

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Alexandra Salomon

Alexandra Salomon is the Senior Director, International at the Interactive Advertising Bureau



 

Just before Valentine’s Day we held an industry town hall style conversation in San Francisco on the romantic topic of mobile and cross-screen audience metrics and measurement.

Before an audience comprised of members of the IAB Mobile and Tablet Committees, and the Research and Ad Ops Councils, a diverse panel of experts shared what their companies are doing around mobile and cross-screen measurement, what buyers want from metrics, and areas where this part of the mobile ecosystem needs to improve.

I want to thank my great group of speakers, including:

  •  Yvonne Chou, Product Management, Ads, and Monetization, Flipboard
  • Anne Frisbie, VP and GM, Global Alliances, InMobi
  • Graham Mudd, Director, Advertising Measurement, North America, Facebook
  • Steve Yarger, Head of Mobile, Trulia

Particular thanks to the folks at Trulia, who kindly let us use their event space for this conversation.

One topic we discussed was the traditional view of “reach” as an important metric—and the question of whether simply being the biggest was still a valuable differentiator for a network or media company.  The answer seemed in general that, yes, scale matters to ad buyers.  But raw, undifferentiated, mass-audience scale is not as valuable as it once might have been.  So InMobi, for example, tends not to talk about its raw reach number, but rather a smaller number (though still a big number—759 million) that counts only those end users for which it has some user-level targeting capabilities.

And of course where reach goes, so goes frequency, and to some extent duration as well.  I wondered (devil’s advocate-style) whether the age of audience buying meant that the good old GRP (reach x frequency) was obsolete.  None of the panelists really felt that way—indeed they all felt that there was increasing need for standardization of GRP-type metrics, for digital (including mobile) and then for cross-screen as well.  Making Measurement Make Sense deserves great credit for coming as far as it has, but the panelists agreed (and I think most 3MS participants would as well) that they still have a very long way to go.  Ad sellers are increasingly hearing demand from agencies to buy based on Nielsen OCR or comScore VCE, and see a role for IAB to help ensure those and any other GRP-style metrics are a sound basis for transactions.

And on the cross-screen frontier, there is a lot of interest, but a lot of concern as well. Vendors helping establish bridges between PC and mobile audiences are great, but some on the panel worry that they are either not transparent enough (or there’s no good way to validate their accuracy) and that on the consumer side there is not enough disclosure yet. Users need to accept and expect what you’re doing with their data, goes the sentiment, and with cross-screen data aggregation, there’s a risk of backlash from not-yet-informed or aware consumers.

Capping this part of the conversation I asked about the future of metrics and Alex from Weather said (half serious half in jest, I think) that we need an industry standard around cross-screen view-through conversions.  He’s probably right, but that’s an intimidating project.

Another point of metrics agreement among all five panelists was that clicks still matter too much in mobile.  First off, we shouldn’t even be calling them “clicks” or using the acronym “CTR” at all—in mobile the term is “taps.”  So even getting marketers talking about “tap rates” would be a minor victory.  But the major victory would be moving them from talking about taps to identifying and using better, deeper metrics to judge whether their messages are working.

I’ve been a proponent of trying this for some time, indeed IAB’s been on the “down with CTRs” message on desktop for ages.  But one interesting thing that came up in the town hall was that specific verticals have metrics they like, that they feel have proven (at least in terms of conventional wisdom) correlations to business results.

The two cited were:

Media and entertainment: movie studios look at trailer completion rates, believe a higher completion rate correlates with better box office.

Pharma: pharmaceutical companies look at the number of ad viewers who go three-clicks-deep into the content about a given drug. There’s a belief that people who do that are much more likely to go on to talk to their doctors and possibly get a prescription.

I am intrigued by these “magic metrics”—I’d like to start a collection of them for other verticals.  There’s a huge  value to simple, relevant, consistently defined metrics, especially if those metrics have an accepted correlation with actual leads, sales, or other valued business results.

Making mobile measurement make sense (which I’ve already heard referred to half-jokingly as “4MS”) is very much on the Mobile Center’s mind this year.  This town hall  was the first, but certainly not the last, industry conversation we’ll be facilitating, and Metrics and Measurement is going to be big at our upcoming Mobile Marketplace conference on April 7 here in New York.  I’m looking forward to hearing your thoughts on these issues, either there or in other venues later in the year.

About the Author

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Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Senior Director, Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.

 

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For marketers just getting their feet wet in mobile, it can be hard to understand return on investment. At the macro level, spending on mobile advertising is booming (new research from IAB and IAB Europe pegs mobile ad revenue at $8.9 Billion USD worldwide in 2012). However, an overly narrow view risks undervaluing the benefits that mobile advertising brings. That’s why we are pleased to unveil the newest IAB Mobile Center web tool: Mobile Value.

Mobile Value enables a holistic view of the multi-channel impact of mobile advertising.  Our calculator consists of a series of simple, fill-in-the-blank web-based forms that invite marketers to input basic data from a recent (or ongoing) campaign—no names or details needed. 

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The Mobile Value tool incorporates five key mobile value-drivers:

  • Calls
  • App downloads
  • Cross device purchases
  • Mobile site visits
  • In-store sales

Of course, not all of these will apply to all campaigns or all marketers, but completing a full circuit of the tool’s components results in a calculation that demonstrates, in dollars and cents, the value a marketer derives from its mobile ad investment.

Complementing each component is a set of measurement tips to help a marketer find (or estimate) the data they need, along with case studies that drive home how each of these components contributes to the total return from mobile advertising.

We’d like to thank our friends at Google for their help creating this tool, and we hope that marketers find it a useful compass as they navigate mobile’s waters!

About the Author 

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Joe Laszlo


Joe Laszlo is Senior Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB.

 

3 Strategies to Reach Mobilecultural Users

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Top publishers, mobile and social media experts discuss how to reach multicultural audiences

On Thursday, February 21, 2013, the IAB in partnership with Social Media Week New York held “Mobilecultural: How to Reach the Emerging Mobile, Social and Multicultural User”, a discussion about how brands, marketers and publishers can reach multicultural audiences on social and mobile platforms. The IAB AdLab was packed with more than 100 attendees from agencies, publishers, and brand marketers. Panelists included representatives from all sides of the digital ecosystem, who were able to give a broad perspective how mobile and social media are converging for African American, Hispanic, and other multicultural audiences.

However, it’s not enough to just tell people where the industry is going, it’s better to show them. Monica Bannan, VP of Mobile Media at Nielsen dexterously set the stage with Nielsen’s newly released data that featured the latest trends and data on social and mobile media usage within the last year. Monica opened the presentation with data on how digital is becoming increasing mobile with 36 hours spent online vs. 34 hours spent on mobile devices. This data is in line with the mobile research done by the IAB Mobile Center such as Mobile’s Role in a Consumer’s Media Day.  Monica’s presentation also revealed how multicultural users are over-indexing on smartphone adoption with 74% by Asians and 68% by African American and Hispanic users. Such numbers reinforce not only the increasing growth of mobile but that multicultural usage of the mobile platform is growing at encouraging rates.

 Cheryl Contee, Co-Founder of Fission Strategy, Attentive.ly, and the popular blog Jack & Jill Politics greatly directed and moderated the panel discussion with thought leaders: 

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SMWmbc 2013

The conversation was exciting and dynamic, but if I had to pull out just three main takeaways from it they would be the following:

Marketers and brands must move toward mobile and social to engage users, particularly within multicultural audiences.  

Lateef Sarnor was able to hone in on what most of the thought leaders are seeing at their companies which is that “social is part of the DNA” and with the high adoption of mobile devices by multicultural users “those realities have informed mobile strategy and everything is becoming mobile first.” 

Marketers, advertisers and brands creating engaging multicultural content should avoid the pitfalls of a one-size-fits-all formula.  

As Adrian Carrasquillo said, “multicultural consumers don’t want a second rate experience just because it’s niche. You have to elevate the conversation.” Diana Valencia noted that when creating content for multicultural users “it’s important to play into cultural cues whether it’s with content, style or humor you have to differentiate that. This will enhance affinity and empathy of the consumer.”  

So, what is the future for publishers, marketers and brands reaching mobilecultural users?  Manny Miravete didn’t have his Google glasses on hand to tell us the future but did state that “what is now local engagement will become macro.” It will be increasingly important for all businesses to sync their local and national efforts for both social and mobile campaigns. A second important trend for the mobile industry is as Marcus Ellington concretely states that “in the future more businesses will invest future budget in multicultural, mobile and social because they will see it works.”  

Behind every mouse click or swipe is an actual human.  

Cheryl Contee brought it all home with a statement that many advertisers, brands and marketers can agree with which is that “it’s important to remember you have the technology but be smart with how you’re applying that technology to actual human beings.”  The IAB Mobile Marketing Center strongly supports that idea and will continue to facilitate these and other conversations to continue to move the industry in a direction of growth and understanding of technology and the human beings behind them. 

To learn more about events and groups on this topic please visit iab.net/mobile.

About the Author

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Yolanda Brown


Yolanda Brown works with the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB on their various mobile committees, events, and initiatives. She also manages IAB Mobile Center’s ‘Tap Into Mobile’ program which helps businesses small and large optimize their sites for the mobile web. She can be reached on Twitter @YolandaMBrown.  


 

Understanding Mobile Discrepancies and the Technology Frontier

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Mobile is often referred to as the Wild Wild West of digital media. Well, the West didn’t stay “wild” forever, and neither can the mobile marketplace. It is one of the roles of the IAB to help tame this new frontier. Discrepancies, differences in the count of metrics like impressions or interactions between two parties, are one of the major challenges that make mobile seem lawless today. While discrepancies aren’t unique to mobile campaigns, some of the challenges with investigating and solving them are.

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To dig further into this issue, the IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence hosted a mobile discrepancy working session on February 5th here at the IAB Ad Lab. We brought participants from each part of the mobile supply chain together to talk through mobile discrepancies with the objective of identifying where they are occurring, why, and potentially avenues where the IAB can help the industry. Having a collaborative mix of different perspectives all together in one room fostered knowledge sharing and brought to light new insights.

 

From a combination of breakout sessions and group conversations we learned that while the troubleshooting process and even some of the root causes of mobile discrepancies are pretty similar to display campaigns on the web, new technology drives some differences. This includes new technology from within the advertising industry as well the innovation taking place in the marketplace.

 

The new ad specific technology of mobile is an area where the IAB can help. New mobile-focused ad  products result in differences in how metrics are counted, reported and even terminology is defined. Like in the early days of web advertising, this is a clear place where the IAB along with our members can help by developing definitions and guidelines. We have already started this with initiatives like MRAID, Mobile Web Measurement Guidelines and the Mobile Phone Creative Guidelines.

 

Addressing marketplace technology, the fragmentation of devices, operations systems, screen sizes etc., is a bit more challenging. Not only does this create a challenge for developing ad creatives and testing them on devices, but also targeting and even traffic validation, especially for campaigns running across platforms. While some of these variables are beyond the advertising industry’s control, education and best practices can help reduce the friction they cause.

 

Now that we have clearer understanding of the many factors causing mobile discrepancies we can buckle down, roll up our sleeves, and work together to reduce them and grow trust in the mobile platform. This will take time and involvement from all parties in the digital advertising ecosystem, but based on the enthusiasm of everyone who attended the working session it is clear this is something the industry needs and is ready to do.  After all, the West wasn’t settled in one afternoon.


 About the Author

sabrina alimi.jpg

Sabrina Alimi

Senior Manager, IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence


Sabrina Alimi is the Senior Marketing Manager of the IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, where she has a focus on ad operations and key mobile initiatives such as HTML best practices, mobile creative guidelines, discrepancies, and the future of the cookie. In addition, Sabrina leads the IAB’s Local Committee, exploring the opportunities that the use of location unlocks for mobile advertising. Prior to the IAB, Sabrina worked at Microsoft Advertising on the Atlas Media Console where she became a product expert providing technical support to clients and managing bug escalations. She can be reached on Twitter @SabrinaAlimi.

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