Results tagged “Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence” from IABlog

For marketers just getting their feet wet in mobile, it can be hard to understand return on investment. At the macro level, spending on mobile advertising is booming (new research from IAB and IAB Europe pegs mobile ad revenue at $8.9 Billion USD worldwide in 2012). However, an overly narrow view risks undervaluing the benefits that mobile advertising brings. That’s why we are pleased to unveil the newest IAB Mobile Center web tool: Mobile Value.

Mobile Value enables a holistic view of the multi-channel impact of mobile advertising.  Our calculator consists of a series of simple, fill-in-the-blank web-based forms that invite marketers to input basic data from a recent (or ongoing) campaign—no names or details needed. 

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The Mobile Value tool incorporates five key mobile value-drivers:

  • Calls
  • App downloads
  • Cross device purchases
  • Mobile site visits
  • In-store sales

Of course, not all of these will apply to all campaigns or all marketers, but completing a full circuit of the tool’s components results in a calculation that demonstrates, in dollars and cents, the value a marketer derives from its mobile ad investment.

Complementing each component is a set of measurement tips to help a marketer find (or estimate) the data they need, along with case studies that drive home how each of these components contributes to the total return from mobile advertising.

We’d like to thank our friends at Google for their help creating this tool, and we hope that marketers find it a useful compass as they navigate mobile’s waters!

About the Author 

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Joe Laszlo


Joe Laszlo is Senior Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB.

A room full of top mobile thought leaders gathered at the 5th annual IAB Mobile Marketplace yesterday. The IAB Mobile Marketing of Excellence was honored to lead the full day of keynote speakers, workshops, and town hall discussions on leveraging opportunities in mobile marketing. The time to act on those opportunities is now.

Inspired by an awesome event, I put together a list of 10 tweets from the event highlighting the power of mobile. Don’t hesitate to retweet them out!

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About the Author

Anna Bager


Anna Bager

Anna Bager is Vice President and General Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB. You can tweet her @AnnaBager.

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Another great Mobile World Congress has come to an end and as always it was even greater and more spectacular than last year. As interesting as the event was, it was challenging to really grasp MWC 2012 as a whole because of the size and mass of things going on at the same time.

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Brands, agencies, technology and operators seemed to be well represented in MWC attendance. While this clearly proves the greatness of mobile right now, it also highlights the problems an event like this faces when it no longer is “just for the tech folks”; there are so many cool things going on and so much networking it becomes almost overwhelming. The top things that stood out to me were:

  1. Less focus on technology and more on features or utility, such as M-Commerce, M-Wallet and Mobile banking. This represents huge opportunities globally—people want their mobile experience to reflect their lives and provide functionality, not just be a cool device. Mobile is no longer just about mobile. It is about media consumption and communication across several devices and platforms, and a tie-in to the way people live their lives across multiple screens.

  2. Regulation was also a continuously recurring topic of discussion. It is clear that the industry needs to show responsibility and start paying even more attention to regulators in order to continue growing, something the IAB Public Policy office in Washington, D.C. is closely working on.

  3. Advertising and monetization of mobile. While that theme was around last year, in 2012 this was actually a conference track. I led a panel in this track, “Mobile Advertising: The Mobile Advertising Ecosystem - Making It Work”, with a fantastic lineup: Google, Huawei, Telenor, Adidas and Initiative. The key takeaway was that the main things we all need to do to drive this forward are: Education, Education and Education and then Evangelization.

  4. 1% women max. Even though the event is getting broader it is somewhat sad to see that it is still hugely male dominated. Especially with the focus on mobile naturally integrated into people’s lives, busy female professionals and the strength of mobile moms are an incredibly powerful demographic opportunity for advertisers to capture.

  5. The Samsung Galaxy Beam projector smartphone. Everyone seemed to talk about this device. It’s fascinating to think about how phones and tablets with projectors can even further change media consumption. Check out MobileBurn.com’s video demo of it here.

Most importantly MWC 2012 was a great party, truly global, friendly, massive and totally worth it. See you at next year’s!

About the Author

Anna Bager

Anna Bager

Anna Bager is Vice President and General Manager of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB. You can tweet her @AnnaBager and follow the IAB on Twitter @IAB.

 

The IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence held our second tablet event in the IAB Ad Lab last week. A breakfast session focused on the theme of creativity, this event included some intriguing data from Nielsen, inspirational examples of ads and content pushing the bounds of tablet creativity, and a spirited discussion on what 2012 holds for the tablet.

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That part of the conversation focused on looking ahead particularly caught my attention. The answers varied broadly and included:

  • The rise of the “7-inch” tablet form factor; the question of where smartphones end and tablets begin will be a really interesting and tricky one.

  • The web experience on tablets. Delivering a better web experience, or hybrids of web and app experiences, will be a potential game-changer.

  • Fragmentation and the lack of standardization. A myriad of screen sizes, app user interfaces, and ad formats all combine to make tablets a great creative opportunity, but a tricky and hard-to-scale one, too.

  • The tablet as foundation. Right now tablets enter late in the media conversation. But that could flip: imagine discussions that center on the tablet as the start of the process of designing a new content offering or consumer service.

All great food for thought, and beyond that ongoing issues like the race to be the number 2 tablet, what Apple does next, and how tablets influence and affect overall consumer media consumption behaviors, virtually assure that we’ll have a lot to watch and learn from in the coming year.

The thing that intrigues me about tablets is that, more than any other device today, people see in them any and every device or medium they want to see. For people with a TV heritage, tablets are TVs you can hold in your hands. For people coming from the print world, tablets are the ideal, interactive magazine. And for those from the Internet universe, tablets are the perfect, tactile, portal onto interactive content. And all of these seemingly incompatible views are correct. Tablets really can be all these things, and more.

But given this wonderful, amazing diversity, how do content owners and marketers make sense of the tablet opportunity? As with previous interactive media, this is a place where the IAB can help.

The IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence is turning the Tablet Task Force group into an official Tablet Committee, taking its place alongside the other platform-specific IAB committees. This group will be open to any IAB member company that wants to participate, taking on projects to grow the tablet advertising market and providing an industry-wide forum for discussing how the tablet is evolving as a medium. Interested in joining the Tablet Committee? IAB members please contact Luke Luckett in the IAB Member Services group - we’d love to have you aboard.

About the Author

Joe Laszlo Joe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Deputy Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB.

 

davy.jpgLast month the IAB’s Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence launched a new working group focused on identifying, discussing, and (where possible) solving mobile ad operations issues. Tackling the challenges of online ad ops has been one of the IAB’s core priorities over the years—and an area of some of our most important accomplishments. We hope that we can leverage that long experience to help the mobile interactive industry tackle its unique challenges at an accelerated rate.

Working closely with both the Mobile Center and the IAB Ad Ops Council, the Mobile Ad Ops Working Group will help us keep pace with the fast-changing mobile world. I thought the first conversation was great. It uncovered a number of issues that I was aware of, but also some that I’d not really considered. Here is a brief review of some of the topics keeping the mobile ad ops community up at night.

  • Mobile ad serving. I’ve been hearing a lot about the problems that exist around mobile ad serving, particularly mobile rich media and video ads. The IAB’s Mobile Rich-media Ad Interface Definitions (MRAID) is an effort to simplify life for creators of mobile rich media ads. We need to investigate further the state of mobile video serving, including the applicability of the IAB’s existing Video Ad Serving Template (VAST) and Video Player Ad Interface Definitions (VPAID) specs.

  • Discrepancies. A longstanding thorn in the side of interactive advertising, discrepancies are a big problem in mobile impression counting and other measurement as well. The IAB/MMA/MRC guidelines for mobile web ad measurement should help by providing common principles for how to count impressions, but it’s clearly an area where more work is needed. Our group will also explore leveraging the IAB’s Impression Exchange Solution (IES) to help advance the mobile front of the war on discrepancies.

  • HTML5. Many in the industry think HTML5 is going to be sort of a savior, a standard that will make content development much easier across the fragmented landscape of mobile devices. Online ad sellers need to set expectations about how much of a panacea HTML5 will or can be. We can help educate buyers about the when and how of HTML5, too. At the same time, some in the industry are beginning to think about how much HTML5 is going to change not just the mobile web, but the PC web as well.

  • Testing and Validation Challenges. The testing and validation process is always going to be a difficult challenge in mobile—with thousands of devices all potentially behaving slightly differently from one another, it will never be simple. Establishing some best practices around testing and validation, and providing a forum for sharing insights, both came up as helpful steps.

  • Geotargeting. It turns out that when you don’t have access to a handset’s GPS or other location data, geotargeting is problematic, with issues similar to the early days of the web: proxy server locations throw off automated technologies for geotargeting.

  • Educating Agencies. Members of the working group see a strong need for a one-stop place the agency community can go for mobile education in laymen’s terms. They find themselves explaining even basic things, like the MMA ad sizes, and the lack of support for Flash on Apple devices. At the same time there’s a perception that agencies want jump straight to creating the most sophisticated “crazy shaking pouring-the-beer-type” ads.

  • Communicating With Phone Developers/Manufacturers. The other common refrain from the ad ops group was the need for a better dialog with device makers. This is a big challenge, since some of them famously don’t listen to outsiders much.

Of course, some of these challenges are easier to address than others. But all are important, and I’m looking forward to working with our mobile ad ops group, the IAB Ad Ops Council, and the larger community of IAB Mobile Center and Mobile Committee members to develop a game plan and to start to tackle them.

About the Author

sp_laszlo_joe.jpgJoe Laszlo

Joe Laszlo is Deputy Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, at the IAB.