Results tagged “Google” from IABlog

8 Headlines For Digital Publishers To Ponder

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In a din of daily tweets, press releases and stories covering the media space, some stories deserve more attention than others. Here are 8 signs of the times that digital publishers should peruse and ponder as they head into 2014.

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1. ESPN mobile traffic eclipses its desktop traffic

It’s been widely anticipated that mobile will overtake desktop traffic for most publishers in 2014. One by one you see brands like ESPN announcing that this milestone has already occurred. Publishers need to be ready for the implications of a mobile first world. New ad solutions and new business models are required. If you don’t have a strategy for mobile yet (and you should), it’s critical you get one before 1/1/14.

2. YouTube announced that they are adopting Nielsen OCR as currency

With this move YouTube should be poised to capture a large amount of the volume of investment spent on video advertising since they are now being seen as more friendly by marketers and their agencies. Anybody in the video advertising space knows that transacting on Nielsen OCR or comscore VCE is not an easy proposition since it can result in serving ads against impressions that don’t count towards the advertiser campaign goals. YouTube’s move is a big signal that these forms of currency are fast becoming the norm.

3. Yahoo News hires Katie Couric and FOX Business News hires Maria Bartiromo.

It’s important to ask if Yahoo thinks Couric will drive more 18-to-34-year-old news hounds to Yahoo News? Probably not. However it will make it easier for Yahoo News to earn a place in the White House press corps, secure big news gets, and help to continue to position Yahoo as more than an aggregator. Ditto with Maria Bartiromo. Her presence may not drive immediate ratings or hurt CNBC, but it will certainly attract high level exclusives and in the long run, potentially switch momentum.

4. Rolling Stone announces Rolling Stone Country.

The expansion of Rolling Stone content into country music is a sign that all publishers (online or off) are looking at new ways to get into businesses that are adjacent to their core business models. Every publisher should be going through the same exercise and making similar moves into adjacent businesses. As other examples of this, CNN recently launched a platform to share Instagram photos direct from the field, called Scenes, and dozens of publishers are publishing their content directly through Flipboard. These are the kinds of innovations each publisher should be seeking out.

5. Google adopts viewable impressions as currency in AdWords. 

In August Google quietly announced that it was going to transact with viewable impressions. The current proposed viewable impression definition is still only a recommendation from the Making Measurement Makes Sense consortium made up of the IAB, ANA, and 4A’s. Google’s running ahead with what they’re calling ‘active view’ as a currency that viewable impressions are something that every publisher needs to pay close attention to because it is absolutely going to become table stakes for ad campaign budgets moving forward.

6. The FTC review of native advertising

When hundreds of people descended on Washington to attend the FTC’s review of native advertising it signaled not only that native advertising was big (eMarketer estimates say it’s a $2.36 Billion market) but that it’s something the industry needs to get its act together on and self-regulate. Publishers should go out of their way to make sure readers are not confused on the difference between editorial content and advertising content. Proper labeling is the key. If publishers label paid content as coming from an advertiser, there should be no more confusion. If they do that, there should be no more FTC hearings. The IAB recently released their native advertising guidelines which is a first positive step to tackling this problem/opportunity.

7. The Visual Revolution Summit

Early in December in New York City a first of its kind summit around the visual web occurred. The “Visual web” feels like it’s the new new thing. One only needs to look at the rise of Pinterest, Instagram, BuzzFeed, Tumblr and others to know that a picture is worth more than 1000 words. Publishers are actively redesigning for feed and gallery formats. Native advertising can be simplified with and an embrace of images over text is a way to communicate this. The emergence of the visual web is a big deal.

8. The Internet of things

While CES is only a few weeks away it’s safe to assume that the Internet of things is going to receive a tidal wave of attention coming out of this massive gathering in sunny Las Vegas. It’s hard to predict what digital publishers will do in this new ecosystem but it’s safe to assume that marketers will be looking for ways to bring their products and services into the home and workplace and non-conventional, non-media driven ways.

About the Author
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Peter Naylor is the IAB’s first Publisher-in-Residence, providing thought leadership and critical industry insights on the most important challenges and opportunities facing digital publishers today. Until recently, the digital media pioneer was the EVP of Sales for NBC News Digital. Prior to that, he oversaw advertising sales for the company’s entertainment and sports digital properties. Naylor was Chairman of the IAB Board of Directors from February 2012 through February 2013. You can reach him on Twitter @prnaylor.
 




For marketers just getting their feet wet in mobile, it can be hard to understand return on investment. At the macro level, spending on mobile advertising is booming (new research from IAB and IAB Europe pegs mobile ad revenue at $8.9 Billion USD worldwide in 2012). However, an overly narrow view risks undervaluing the benefits that mobile advertising brings. That’s why we are pleased to unveil the newest IAB Mobile Center web tool: Mobile Value.

Mobile Value enables a holistic view of the multi-channel impact of mobile advertising.  Our calculator consists of a series of simple, fill-in-the-blank web-based forms that invite marketers to input basic data from a recent (or ongoing) campaign—no names or details needed. 

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The Mobile Value tool incorporates five key mobile value-drivers:

  • Calls
  • App downloads
  • Cross device purchases
  • Mobile site visits
  • In-store sales

Of course, not all of these will apply to all campaigns or all marketers, but completing a full circuit of the tool’s components results in a calculation that demonstrates, in dollars and cents, the value a marketer derives from its mobile ad investment.

Complementing each component is a set of measurement tips to help a marketer find (or estimate) the data they need, along with case studies that drive home how each of these components contributes to the total return from mobile advertising.

We’d like to thank our friends at Google for their help creating this tool, and we hope that marketers find it a useful compass as they navigate mobile’s waters!

About the Author 

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Joe Laszlo


Joe Laszlo is Senior Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB.

The advertising ecosystem today is inventing smart, unique campaigns that use the latest interactive advances to engage consumers. The results are powerful.  With audiences bombarded by marketing messages in every medium, advertisers are pushing the envelope to get attention and creating a truly dynamic marketplace as they surprise, delight, and win followers.

In response, we’ve added seven new categories to this year’s IAB MIXX Awards to make sure the best, most forward-thinking work gets noticed. Through the global IAB MIXX Awards, the IAB recognizes the talent that crafts this innovative, leading edge and high impact creative. The new categories give the digital industry more opportunities to showcase how brands and agencies move their business - and the advertising industry - forward.

Iab-mixx-awards-2013-logo.jpgBranded Utility
A successful branded utility campaign has the power to embed the use of the brand into consumers’ everyday behavior—Nike+ FuelBand, the 2013 IAB MIXX Awards Gold winner in Digital Integration—is the perfect example.  David’s Bridal recently got media attention for its app that lets brides make wish lists, interact with bridesmaids, keep track of their bridal purchases, plan the wedding party, show her current mood through an icon, upload images, log-in via Facebook and send invites to friends through the social network.  Those newlyweds might then move on to using the Chip It! app from 2012 IAB MIXX Awards’ “Best in Show” winners Sherwin Williams and McKinney that lets you match real world colors with paint colors. 

Content Marketing
Content marketing is increasingly recognized as a new channel for brand marketers.  At least two major agencies recently announced new units devoted to helping clients with content marketing development.  American Express is well known for its “OPEN” Forum dispensing advice of all kinds to small businesses.  Lincoln Motor Company’s “Lincoln Now” site features content that celebrates design, technology and art, and in the process, the company’s 90-year history of making cars.

Augmented Reality
Augmented reality campaigns take advantage of consumers’ addictive smartphone behavior by creating often game-like apps that communicate brand messages in clever ways.  How do you get an adult audience to rekindle their love of Lucky Charms cereal?  This year Lucky Charms agency Saatchi and Saatchi created an augmented reality app that sent customers on a “Chase for the Charms,” complete with a $10,000 “pot of gold” at the end of the rainbow.

Custom Mobile Rich Media Display  AND IAB Standard Mobile Rich Media Display

With mobile advertising skyrocketing by 111% in 2012 as reported in our recent study, brands are out to take advantage of the landslide shift of eyeballs to mobile. Major publishers like USA Today, New York Times, ESPN and more are hosting rich media ads on their mobile apps, and platforms like Google, Twitter, Facebook and Pandora are drawing huge mobile audiences.  Last year the IAB established its first-ever mobile ad standards — the Mobile Rising Stars.  Agencies are expressing great creative ideas through these new formats with great consumer and business effect.  For example, Dunkin’ Donuts and Celtra used Facebook for a mobile ad using rich media and HTML5 to let users customize their perfect drink.

Clicks-to-Bricks
Retail brand marketers are using interactive in significant ways to drive traffic to their brick and mortar stores.  Macy’s created an all-purpose Black Friday app last November that enabled shoppers to preview and get push notification on Black Friday specials, create lists to share with friends and family, direct shoppers toward local store specials and preview exclusive items.  The app’s debut coincided with Macy’s holiday broadcast campaign featuring spots with Justin Bieber, Carlos Santana, Martha Stewart and Taylor Swift.  The IAB MIXX Awards honor not just creativity but impact and nowhere is ROI felt more immediately than in a retail environment

What’s next? We’ve added one final category to find out:

Can’t be Contained!  - Any execution so experimental and innovative that it defies categorization in the IAB MIXX Awards!
Technology is moving fast, and cutting edge agencies and brand marketers are keeping up with it.  “Can’t be Contained” offers agencies and brand marketers the chance to submit their campaigns using the latest most experimental, groundbreaking technology.  No doubt there are even more forward thinking digitally savvy campaigns on the horizon.

Learn more about the global IAB MIXX Awards at iab.net/mixxawards.

About the Author 
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Peter Minnium
As the Head of Brand Initiatives at IAB, Peter Minnium leads a series of initiatives designed to address the under-representation of creative brand advertising online. He can be reached on Twitter @PeterMinnium.

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3 Strategies to Reach Mobilecultural Users

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Top publishers, mobile and social media experts discuss how to reach multicultural audiences

On Thursday, February 21, 2013, the IAB in partnership with Social Media Week New York held “Mobilecultural: How to Reach the Emerging Mobile, Social and Multicultural User”, a discussion about how brands, marketers and publishers can reach multicultural audiences on social and mobile platforms. The IAB AdLab was packed with more than 100 attendees from agencies, publishers, and brand marketers. Panelists included representatives from all sides of the digital ecosystem, who were able to give a broad perspective how mobile and social media are converging for African American, Hispanic, and other multicultural audiences.

However, it’s not enough to just tell people where the industry is going, it’s better to show them. Monica Bannan, VP of Mobile Media at Nielsen dexterously set the stage with Nielsen’s newly released data that featured the latest trends and data on social and mobile media usage within the last year. Monica opened the presentation with data on how digital is becoming increasing mobile with 36 hours spent online vs. 34 hours spent on mobile devices. This data is in line with the mobile research done by the IAB Mobile Center such as Mobile’s Role in a Consumer’s Media Day.  Monica’s presentation also revealed how multicultural users are over-indexing on smartphone adoption with 74% by Asians and 68% by African American and Hispanic users. Such numbers reinforce not only the increasing growth of mobile but that multicultural usage of the mobile platform is growing at encouraging rates.

 Cheryl Contee, Co-Founder of Fission Strategy, Attentive.ly, and the popular blog Jack & Jill Politics greatly directed and moderated the panel discussion with thought leaders: 

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SMWmbc 2013

The conversation was exciting and dynamic, but if I had to pull out just three main takeaways from it they would be the following:

Marketers and brands must move toward mobile and social to engage users, particularly within multicultural audiences.  

Lateef Sarnor was able to hone in on what most of the thought leaders are seeing at their companies which is that “social is part of the DNA” and with the high adoption of mobile devices by multicultural users “those realities have informed mobile strategy and everything is becoming mobile first.” 

Marketers, advertisers and brands creating engaging multicultural content should avoid the pitfalls of a one-size-fits-all formula.  

As Adrian Carrasquillo said, “multicultural consumers don’t want a second rate experience just because it’s niche. You have to elevate the conversation.” Diana Valencia noted that when creating content for multicultural users “it’s important to play into cultural cues whether it’s with content, style or humor you have to differentiate that. This will enhance affinity and empathy of the consumer.”  

So, what is the future for publishers, marketers and brands reaching mobilecultural users?  Manny Miravete didn’t have his Google glasses on hand to tell us the future but did state that “what is now local engagement will become macro.” It will be increasingly important for all businesses to sync their local and national efforts for both social and mobile campaigns. A second important trend for the mobile industry is as Marcus Ellington concretely states that “in the future more businesses will invest future budget in multicultural, mobile and social because they will see it works.”  

Behind every mouse click or swipe is an actual human.  

Cheryl Contee brought it all home with a statement that many advertisers, brands and marketers can agree with which is that “it’s important to remember you have the technology but be smart with how you’re applying that technology to actual human beings.”  The IAB Mobile Marketing Center strongly supports that idea and will continue to facilitate these and other conversations to continue to move the industry in a direction of growth and understanding of technology and the human beings behind them. 

To learn more about events and groups on this topic please visit iab.net/mobile.

About the Author

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Yolanda Brown


Yolanda Brown works with the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB on their various mobile committees, events, and initiatives. She also manages IAB Mobile Center’s ‘Tap Into Mobile’ program which helps businesses small and large optimize their sites for the mobile web. She can be reached on Twitter @YolandaMBrown.  


For those who have been out of the IAB news loop, last week we held our Annual Leadership Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona.  It was an intense, jam-packed few days.  One of the highlights for me was that I got to be a “provocateur” in a Town Hall-style break out session we held on mobile monetization, called “Are Mobile Pennies Inevitable? The Challenge of Mobile Monetization.”  Under the able moderation of Chris LaSala of Google and Cary Tilds of GroupM, participants jumped in to a lively series of discussions about the challenges facing mobile advertising today, and how we—the industry and the IAB—can contribute to solving them.

We started by enumerating and prioritizing the problems:  according to a Kleiner Perkins study, mobile revenue is something like 75 cents per user as compared to $3.50 per user on desktop. 

Most of the mobile problems we came up with are familiar ones:

·        1. Lack of knowledge about how to measure

·         2. Too much complexity (HTML5 v Flash, varied screen sizes, etc)

·         3. Creatives hate it:  too small, too fragmented

·         4. Standardization is needed

·         And so on….

But the biggest problem for investors and brands in mobile is that there’s a lot of chaos to sort through.  It’s hard to figure out how to invest in mobile faster, and hard to keep on top of the landscape.

What is Mobile?

 One challenge is that we don’t even have a firm answer to “what is mobile?”  And indeed, the distinction between “mobile” and “not mobile” may be fading away.  Whether we separate out mobile, or how we divide up the world, depends on what we’re talking about. 

From a marketing strategy perspective, there’s a compelling view that “mobile” shouldn’t be separated out, we should think in terms of at home versus office, event, retail, and other places.  The tablet on the couch, the screen in the car dashboard, the smartphone in a restaurant:  it’s where you are physically that defines the opportunity, not what device you happen to have.  As the IAB says, mobile is really a behavior, not a device type.

Another participant advocated a hub-and-spoke framework, where mobile is not unique or disconnected from other media, but is the central device/medium for advertising, and other media (TV, outdoor, print, PC, etc) all are spokes that relate to the mobile hub.

Plumbing

While a marketing strategy perspective may be ready to move beyond the mobile/non-mobile dichotomy, a plumbing point of view still argues for looking at mobile as a distinct medium.  There are unique, mobile-specific problems that need to be resolved before these integrated, cross-screen marketing plans are feasible.  These relate to scale, approach, and currency, among other things.  Technical solutions like HTML 5 will help with some aspects of the plumbing problem but there’s still a lot to do to get mobile advertising flowing easily.

Standards

Another strong theme from the Town Hall was that while standards are starting to exist (thanks, IAB!), they are not there, not deep enough, or not clear enough yet.

One of our subgroups recommended, “standardize first, and innovation follows.”  Another asked if it shouldn’t be the other way around.  That comment sparked the great question: “Is there a necessary trade-off between awesomeness and standardization?”  The broader chicken-and-egg question is important, and it shapes the way the IAB approaches timing for mobile and other standards projects.  We count on members and others in the ecosystem to let us know if we’re being premature or late to the game.  And I do agree that we should strive for standards that permit, or even encourage, awesomeness.

Takeaways

One summary of the conversation held that mobile does not have a monetization problem, it has a measurement problem.  And the measurement problem can be decomposed into two parts:  a plumbing problem and a standards problem.  However, we as an industry are not 100% sure on what the solution to the plumbing problem should be, and if it should cover just mobile or extend across screens/devices.  And there’s not complete agreement that there should be standards yet.

A pithier summary of the conversation was:  “The screen size is small.  That sucks.  Get over it, and learn to build mobile creative that works.”

In my mind, both of these conclusions imply time as part of the solution.  Time is needed for brands and agencies to get their bearings where mobile is concerned, and it takes time for the media side of the industry to move from competitive land grab to cooperation.  Any standards effort requires consensus around which aspects of mobile are just table stakes (where standardization helps everyone) versus things that are true competitive differentiators.  Hopefully, via conversations like this and our ongoing standards, committee, research, and other efforts, the IAB’s Mobile Center can accelerate that process.

About the Author

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Joe Laszlo


Joe Laszlo is Senior Director of the Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence at the IAB.

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Announcing the 2013 IAB Committee & Council Co-Chairs

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The efforts made by the members of IAB’s committees, councils, working groups, and taskforces have resulted in the development of guidelines, standards, best practices and more, that help to solve operational inefficiencies and define the future of digital advertising.  These elite groups are led by our Committee and Council Co-Chairs, who are responsible for developing agendas, setting goals, and strengthening collaborative relationships among our membership.

The IAB congratulates the 2013 Committee & Council Co-Chairs, who have demonstrated through leadership and participation their commitment to the industry’s growth and success. You can also follow them on our Twitter list.CC2013cochairs.png

About the Author

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Julie Van Ullen

Julie Van Ullen is the Vice President of Member Services at the Interactive Advertising Bureau. Ms. Van Ullen oversees member acquisition, participation, and retention programs. In addition, she works with designated member leaders to develop strategic, market-marking initiatives for execution within IAB’s Committees and Councils.