Results tagged “Facebook” from IABlog

How to Advertise on Mobile Messaging Apps

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When phones were still considered the ‘3rd screen’, one of the first ways advertisers tried to reach audiences was through SMS campaigns. American Idol anyone? But mobile-friendly social networks such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, with their glitzier interfaces and richer communications through video and images quickly left SMS campaigns in the dust.

But, a Facebook post only has a real life of 3 hours, and a tweet 18 minutes before getting flushed down the timeline. The rise of mobile messaging apps such as WeChat, Line and KakaoTalk promise to combine the direct targeting of SMS with the continuity and multimedia richness of social network communication. How can marketers use these platforms to talk to their consumers effectively?

1. Talk in Emoji

For brands or agencies leading the pack, consider emoji a new exercise in art and copy. Katy Perry’s ‘Roar’ lyric video illustrates how familiarity with the canned symbols is just as important as familiarity with the alphabet in this new craft. For example, the ‘super’ for the line “I got the eye of the tiger a fire”, was “I got the (winking smiley) of the (side tiger)(front tiger)(side tiger) a (flexing bicep).” If that just had you go “???”, think of it as having your copywriter and art director combine into one role, and express in Wingdings. And brands will probably have to get used to the fact that using smileys —and chickens, and monkeys, and poop icons— in their corporate communications is now ‘on-brand’.

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Katy Perry’s “Roar” Lyric Video mashes emoji and text

FYI, Whatsapp, whose interface was featured in the video, didn’t have to pay Perry a dime, simply because she was a fan… and probably has her finger on the pulse of the millennial consumer ;)

2. Hand over your brand with branded stickers

Besides the default emojis, most of the apps come with another type of communication format: Stickers. While emojis are static, canned default symbols from the app, stickers are large, downloadable add-on (read: brandable) GIFs, usually of cute animated characters. The expressiveness of stickers have fans of Line in Taiwan creating viral melodrama comics using the brand’s sticker characters, bunny and bear.

The Walking Dead official account on Line just released their zombie sticker set on Nov 5, allowing fans to disseminate the apocalypse. Stickers are also the perfect vehicle for celebrities. Korean pop idols such as G-Dragon and 2PM have their own suite of mini-me stickers —laughing, crying, booing— expanding the meaning of ‘give your brand over to the fans’. I’m waiting for a Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) to release dancing burgers so I can express my hunger. Turn on your notifications, branded stickers might just become the next hashtag.

Furthermore, these apps are linked to a whole creative suite of ‘in-house’ editing apps such as Line Camera and KakaoStory, that allow you to add filters, messages, stamps to your messaging images. There is a huge possibility there to put a spin on the now ubiquitous photo campaigns. 

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Branded stickers allow consumers to express themselves with your content.

In-app creative apps allow consumers to take your branded content and run with it, such as this Line Camera photo-editing app.

A Walking Dead photo can be edited within Line, with the Line Camera, and shared with friends.

3. Press 1 to Start an Official Dialogue

WeChat brands so far have had the most robust 2-way dialogue with their fans. Starbucks, Harrods, Nike, Durex etc have pinging setups that resemble ‘press one for english’ type phone menus. Chatting with Durex for example, gleans you sex tips, an 8 second voice message in your choice of sexy female or sexy male voice saying ‘Don’t be angry, baby” in Chinese, and hours more of 2-way pleasure.

Nike+ has 8 different workouts delivered right to your message box. Starbucks has the latest coffee blend with gorgeous pictures and a mouth watering description to go along with it. The Walking Dead on Line has ‘On Air’ sessions after every episode airs on TV, attended by over 30,000 fans. This allows the brand to engage directly 1-on-1 with its consumer base, and gauge the popularity of the series’ storyline.

How is this different than an email or Facebook CRM program you might ask? The difference is, consumers can control the path they want to take with talking with the brand, feel special while doing it. And brands get stats on what is most popular.

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The Walking Dead ‘On Air’ function on Line allows 1-on-1 conversations between brand and consumers.

Nike+ on WeChat lets you choose workout programs directly from your message box.

It still remains to be seen when social messaging will truly take off in the U.S. The most popular U.S. based app, Whatsapp, remains staunchly against advertising on its platform. For global brands however, most social messaging apps allow brands to customize localities. So Miley Cyrus has a Japan account, Korean account etc. No matter what, Asia seems to be taking the lead in this conversation, or so its 200 million Wechat users are saying. 

 

WeChat

Line

Kakaotalk

Whatsapp

Facebook

Twitter

Country of Origin

China

South Korea, now Japan-owned

South Korea

US

US

US

Global User base

(millions)

400*

230*

100*

300**

1,555

500

Tech in Asia, August 2013 This statistic gives information on the most popular mobile messenger apps in Asia as of August 2013, based on number of registered users worldwide. As of that month, NHN Japan’s LINE app had 230 million registered users, up from 100 million registered users in January 2013.

**The Next Web; WhatsApp This statistic shows a timeline with the amount of monthly active WhatsApp users worldwide as of October 2013. In August 2013, the mobile messaging platform announced more than 300 million monthly active users, up from over 250 million in June 2013.

About the Author

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Ruth Ong


Ruth Ong is an Art Director at Grey New York. She hails from sunny Singapore and has called New York home for the past 8 years. Besides art, strategy and all things digital, she loves sailing and culinary encounters of the third kind. Twitter: @ruth__ong 

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The advertising ecosystem today is inventing smart, unique campaigns that use the latest interactive advances to engage consumers. The results are powerful.  With audiences bombarded by marketing messages in every medium, advertisers are pushing the envelope to get attention and creating a truly dynamic marketplace as they surprise, delight, and win followers.

In response, we’ve added seven new categories to this year’s IAB MIXX Awards to make sure the best, most forward-thinking work gets noticed. Through the global IAB MIXX Awards, the IAB recognizes the talent that crafts this innovative, leading edge and high impact creative. The new categories give the digital industry more opportunities to showcase how brands and agencies move their business - and the advertising industry - forward.

Iab-mixx-awards-2013-logo.jpgBranded Utility
A successful branded utility campaign has the power to embed the use of the brand into consumers’ everyday behavior—Nike+ FuelBand, the 2013 IAB MIXX Awards Gold winner in Digital Integration—is the perfect example.  David’s Bridal recently got media attention for its app that lets brides make wish lists, interact with bridesmaids, keep track of their bridal purchases, plan the wedding party, show her current mood through an icon, upload images, log-in via Facebook and send invites to friends through the social network.  Those newlyweds might then move on to using the Chip It! app from 2012 IAB MIXX Awards’ “Best in Show” winners Sherwin Williams and McKinney that lets you match real world colors with paint colors. 

Content Marketing
Content marketing is increasingly recognized as a new channel for brand marketers.  At least two major agencies recently announced new units devoted to helping clients with content marketing development.  American Express is well known for its “OPEN” Forum dispensing advice of all kinds to small businesses.  Lincoln Motor Company’s “Lincoln Now” site features content that celebrates design, technology and art, and in the process, the company’s 90-year history of making cars.

Augmented Reality
Augmented reality campaigns take advantage of consumers’ addictive smartphone behavior by creating often game-like apps that communicate brand messages in clever ways.  How do you get an adult audience to rekindle their love of Lucky Charms cereal?  This year Lucky Charms agency Saatchi and Saatchi created an augmented reality app that sent customers on a “Chase for the Charms,” complete with a $10,000 “pot of gold” at the end of the rainbow.

Custom Mobile Rich Media Display  AND IAB Standard Mobile Rich Media Display

With mobile advertising skyrocketing by 111% in 2012 as reported in our recent study, brands are out to take advantage of the landslide shift of eyeballs to mobile. Major publishers like USA Today, New York Times, ESPN and more are hosting rich media ads on their mobile apps, and platforms like Google, Twitter, Facebook and Pandora are drawing huge mobile audiences.  Last year the IAB established its first-ever mobile ad standards — the Mobile Rising Stars.  Agencies are expressing great creative ideas through these new formats with great consumer and business effect.  For example, Dunkin’ Donuts and Celtra used Facebook for a mobile ad using rich media and HTML5 to let users customize their perfect drink.

Clicks-to-Bricks
Retail brand marketers are using interactive in significant ways to drive traffic to their brick and mortar stores.  Macy’s created an all-purpose Black Friday app last November that enabled shoppers to preview and get push notification on Black Friday specials, create lists to share with friends and family, direct shoppers toward local store specials and preview exclusive items.  The app’s debut coincided with Macy’s holiday broadcast campaign featuring spots with Justin Bieber, Carlos Santana, Martha Stewart and Taylor Swift.  The IAB MIXX Awards honor not just creativity but impact and nowhere is ROI felt more immediately than in a retail environment

What’s next? We’ve added one final category to find out:

Can’t be Contained!  - Any execution so experimental and innovative that it defies categorization in the IAB MIXX Awards!
Technology is moving fast, and cutting edge agencies and brand marketers are keeping up with it.  “Can’t be Contained” offers agencies and brand marketers the chance to submit their campaigns using the latest most experimental, groundbreaking technology.  No doubt there are even more forward thinking digitally savvy campaigns on the horizon.

Learn more about the global IAB MIXX Awards at iab.net/mixxawards.

About the Author 
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Peter Minnium
As the Head of Brand Initiatives at IAB, Peter Minnium leads a series of initiatives designed to address the under-representation of creative brand advertising online. He can be reached on Twitter @PeterMinnium.

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Announcing the 2013 IAB Committee & Council Co-Chairs

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The efforts made by the members of IAB’s committees, councils, working groups, and taskforces have resulted in the development of guidelines, standards, best practices and more, that help to solve operational inefficiencies and define the future of digital advertising.  These elite groups are led by our Committee and Council Co-Chairs, who are responsible for developing agendas, setting goals, and strengthening collaborative relationships among our membership.

The IAB congratulates the 2013 Committee & Council Co-Chairs, who have demonstrated through leadership and participation their commitment to the industry’s growth and success. You can also follow them on our Twitter list.CC2013cochairs.png

About the Author

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Julie Van Ullen

Julie Van Ullen is the Vice President of Member Services at the Interactive Advertising Bureau. Ms. Van Ullen oversees member acquisition, participation, and retention programs. In addition, she works with designated member leaders to develop strategic, market-marking initiatives for execution within IAB’s Committees and Councils.

 

#SocialData -- Demystified!

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In a typical session in my free time online I might post a few snapshots on Instagram, check out the latest viral YouTube video and update my Facebook page.  I might also research and buy a book for myself, or a gift—or I might price a couple of possibilities for my family’s summer vacation. But in my use of social media, many of these activities soon give way to new enthusiasms — #lancearmstrong already seems like yesterday’s news by #inaugurationday.

The point is that as more of us live more of our lives through our broadband connections, marketers have to search for ways to access and leverage the vast Social Data trail of our interests—some fleeting and some more abiding—that we create online.

And IAB’s Data Council just rolled out a new report—Social Data: Demystification & Best Practice—that can give companies and marketers a sturdier starting point for understanding and making better use of this growing mass of information and its power to positively influence millions of people through social amplification.

social-tradanalyticsvssocialdataanalytics.JPG Social data that haven’t existed in traditional digital media analytic channels (Social Data: Demystification and Best Practice, IAB)

Social Data flows from a million directions. For example, many online marketers are using trackable URLs when posting to social media. These allow you to see exactly where your traffic and customers come from. Another popular social media tool allows you to add a share button wherever you need one on your website—a tool that creates data about who comes to your site, when and why. Of course social media sites themselves also generate masses of social data for you to use. All in all, just like other entities that are growing their online community, we at IAB use Social Data analysis tools, to see where our offerings are strong and to get feedback that helps us reach unexplored audiences.

Social Data: Demystification and Best Practice offers best practices and a common language to help analyze and discuss the data generated by these many layers of social media. Creating a common language is key, because after extracting Social Data, making useful sense of it is still often not easy—sometimes simply because people use the same terms for different phenomena. The report further explains what must go into meaningful data analytics—another critical hurdle we all must clear, as we move away from tracking mere page views in favor of deeper aspects of Social Data,  including propagation, amplification and sentiment.

What I think is really exciting here—to me, the basis for Social Data’s promise—is that it’s all about social media’s community of millions of people happily and openly coming together. But with the resulting pool of data so deep and varied, the new IAB report is like navigation software that can help you and your particular company or marketing campaign find the right direction through a real jungle of information to your specific goals.  You can download the report at http://iab.net/socialdata.

About the Author

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Patrick Dolan

Patrick Dolan is the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB). Mr. Dolan is responsible for finance, operation, costs, compliance, and risk management. In addition, he works closely with the rest of the executive management team to supervise strategy and revenue optimization. He can be reached on Twitter at @patrickdolan.

 

Refuting the ‘Social Media Hangover’ at Political Conventions

Please excuse this IABer’s arrogance when she says: the experts got it wrong.

After Tampa and Charlotte, the reports came flooding in “social media revolution failed,” “Parties still need physical convention,” and “will social media ever live up to its promise?”

But if you know what I mean when I say #eastwooding, read no further, you probably already get everything I am about to highlight.

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For some reason, just like novice mobile marketers, the pundits looked to social media to replace the political norms, and missed the true Holy Grail. Just as a successful cross platform marketing campaign reaches the consumer as they move throughout their day, in different contexts utilizing both old and new, social media supplements the convention and campaign platform, it is not there to replace it. Breaking down the walls did not simply mean to host a virtual convention, rather, it’s a tool to expand audience and break down access barriers.

Let’s be honest, while baby boomers and beyond are still happy to find a couch during prime time TV, up and coming generations are highly mobile (and I don’t mean by device), they are cord cutters, and they consume a lot of information and entertainment through multiple platforms and services, at the time convenient for them.

Social media is our Where Brother Art Thou’s tin can and soapbox. It’s retail politicking. How in a modern national campaign do you recreate the glad handing, baby kissing, and storytelling necessary for intimate, voter engagement?  Accessibility and communication.

Kal Penn’s call for #sexyface wasn’t just a funny gimmick; it created an opportunity for engagement.  Voters like to feel as though they are a part of the process and in on the secret. It took less than an hour for #sexyface to trend on Twitter.  While an unintended consequence, @InvisibleObama had tens of thousands of followers in the first hour, 40,000 by the next morning.

And this raises a separate question that has yet to truly unfold: measuring social media’s impact.  Some argue in order for social media to be successful, it must be organic. On this point, the two campaigns seem to be diverging, and we will be presented with two case studies by year’s end. Last week, the Romney campaign was the first political campaign to purchase a paid promotion on Twitter. Consider, the President clocks in over 19.6 million followers to the Governor’s 1.1 million.

Campaign strategies aside, the beauty of social media at the conventions this year was its seamless integration - it was universally present, yet invisible - like any great technology should be. From delegates swiping badges to update their Facebook timeline, Eventbrite check-ins, to the hottest ticket in town literally: lattes in the Google Media Lounge, to Convention real-time apps, and Tweet-ups. The experts failed to realize social media at the conventions wasn’t a replacement, but an enhancement.

The 2008 Presidential and 2010 Midterms were just the beginning.  We are only beginning to see the tipping point, and there will be mistakes, flaws, and downright failures as campaigns navigate the best way to put these tools to use.  I am often pointed to the Veep App as evidence social media and technology platforms don’t work for political.  The much-vaunted Veep App would be the first place for voters to find news on the Governor’s announcement for a VP candidate.  Unfortunately for the App, and the campaign, that news broke before the App could.  And it is true; campaigns must have controlled messaging, and esoterically will remain unchanged for the near future.  But don’t shoot the App, campaign leaks are tech-agnostic.

And we’re just scratching the surface. Be sure to join us this year at the IAB MIXX Conference & Expo as some of the smartest minds in media and political discuss the “Digital Election” and examine how the Internet will decide the Presidency this year. To find out more, please visit http://www.iab.net/mixx/agenda.

About the Author

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Sarah Hudgins

Sarah Hudgins is Director, Public Policy, IAB. Follow her @SarahAHudgins.

 

At IAB, we listen a lot to our members and the digital industry. We discuss ideas with you at many of our events, too. And we genuinely want to hear from you, to help us move the industry forward.

As social media manager for IAB and the voice of @IAB, I’m always exploring networks, trends, and tools, and creative ways to strengthen relationships, communicate IAB efforts, create engaging content, help tell your stories, and foster a better two-way dialogue between IAB and its membership. One of those great social media tools we often use in those timely conversations is our Facebook page, of which I’m proud to say that the IAB has 13,549 followers as of this writing.

It’s been a big week in digital advertising. As many of you know, we recently released news of a new standard ad unit portfolio at the fifth anniversary of the IAB Annual Leadership Meeting, an exciting three days among the top thought leaders in digital advertising. Among that portfolio were six IAB Rising Stars Display ad units—new interactive units that enable marketers to tell bigger, bolder brand stories.

Facebook also unveiled its own news yesterday about Facebook Timeline for Brands at its Facebook Marketing Conference (fMC), to help brands tell better stories through their new products such as Timeline for Pages, Mobile Ads and Premium Ads. For those brands that may not have made the switch yet, here’s what some of our members have said about it:

ForbesFacebook Timeline for Brands: It’s About Storytelling

WSJBrand-name deals to mix with Facebook friend posts

AdWeekFacebook Relaunches Its Ad Platform, Says Brand Pages Are At the Center
(by Michael Lazerow, Chairman and CEO of Buddy Media)

AdAgeFacebook Offers Brands, Flush With Fans, New Ways to Spend Money
(including quotes from Mark Renshaw, CIO of Leo Burnett and Bryan Weiner, CEO of 360i)

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We’re pleased to announce that the IAB has already modified our Facebook Page to Timeline, at www.facebook.com/iab. Check it out as a great resource for IAB history, stories, and news. As we begin to share IAB history with interesting content, connect more with people, and tell better stories, take a look and let us know what you think.

Helping you better build your brand stories digitally is important to IAB. In fact, it’s one of our primary goals for 2012. As Randall Rothenberg, President and CEO of IAB, spoke about at our MIXX Conference & Expo in October 2011, such brand innovation in the digital industry will come from storytelling, not simply technology.

Help us continue to build better relationships with you, wherever you are and whatever platforms you use. We want to hear from you!

About the Author

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Jeff Fryer

Jeff Fryer is Marketing Manager, IAB, and helps the IAB to better listen, understand, and engage in conversations in social media. You can tweet him @jfryer2000 and follow the IAB on Twitter @IAB.